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Steppenpig

Web Design

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Just looked at the beeb for the fisrt time in ages, and I see they've gone over to a tiled design, like the guardian.

I can see why Windows 8 tried it out, because it basically looks appealing, as long as you don't try to use it, so it looks good in the shop or the advertising with all the screens looking so uniform. (By contrast, I don't even know what an apple computer looks like. I mean, i know what the hardware looks ike, but not the interface).

But I can't really understand it for news sites. Surely some sort of structure is more user friendly?

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Bloomberg has been completely f*cked up recently.

http://www.bloomberg.com/

They done a good job there.

They must analyse their traffic, and presumably more users are clicking on stuff than before. Do people just poke random squares? it really just puts me right off using it. I dread the next redesign of hpc.

[edit] I have no idea why hotairmail's quote below contains "there" instead of "their". he must have tampered with it.

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Form over substance.

The worst offender being Gov.Uk

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2015/02/18/the_inside_story_of_govuk/

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2015/04/01/gds_digital_services_where_are_they_hmm/

Simply reskinning existing web sites is not IT innovation in my book

Anyway those tiled sites all look the same to me so I don't see how having a boring format that is identical to your rivals is going to help differentiate sites. Almost none of these sites follow what is usually regarded as good web design. Far too much paging/scrolling required for a start

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Just looked at the beeb for the fisrt time in ages, and I see they've gone over to a tiled design, like the guardian.

I can see why Windows 8 tried it out, because it basically looks appealing, as long as you don't try to use it, so it looks good in the shop or the advertising with all the screens looking so uniform. (By contrast, I don't even know what an apple computer looks like. I mean, i know what the hardware looks ike, but not the interface).

But I can't really understand it for news sites. Surely some sort of structure is more user friendly?

Better for touchscreen and mobile to have big touchable tiles over links that your finger obscures or needs pixel perfect accuracy. If you look at it on mobile it's exactly the same except compacted into a single column. Modern web frameworks like Bootstrap enable you to serve the exact same content to desktop tablet and mobile and it will display in the most appropriate layout and give consistency across platforms - although BBC have spunked a load of license fees up the wall creating their own: http://www.bbc.co.uk/frameworks/orb

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There is a big mobile responsive shake up happening with the largest search provider later this Month.

Sites are going over to column/tiled formats as they are easier to render on smaller screens.

Whilst I am sure the BBC can afford a completely separate mobile offering things for everyone else seems have been moving in this direction for a couple of years now.

If a website will not render correctly for mobile/tablet/dsktop PC google have said they are going to degrade it in their SERP.

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