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Dave Beans

Under 40S - Will You Be Retiring At 65?

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..or whatever the retirement age will be... Me? no, I doubt it, but I'd like to think I'd be self-employed, picking and choosing want I want to do...

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I don't think I ever truly want to retire...I'd find it massively boring (I've been unemployed, so I sort of know what its like)...there's only so much fettling you can do.

Edited by Dave Beans

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I'm 26 I expect I won't be able to access pensions until I'm 70 something (but expect to live a poor quality old age to 100). I think I will be pretty much knackered by 65 and working past that will mean I won't make it to retirement. So my rough plan is have my old old age pension access mid 70's and retire at 65 and finance myself for 10 years in my own personal pension. will mean much lower consumption in my life, especially when it comes to housing. And realistically if the housing situation doesn't change in the next few years, then the choice will have to be house or children. Pension won't take a back seat as my personal nightmare is working past 65 in a full time job.

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Oi youngsters! Work is a lovely buzz for a while. But most people will tire of it somewhere between 35 and 45. So even if you're loving it now best to bung some wonga aside. And if you're still doing it at 65, you'll know for certain that you're doing it for love.

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Oi youngsters! Work is a lovely buzz for a while. But most people will tire of it somewhere between 35 and 45. So even if you're loving it now best to bung some wonga aside. And if you're still doing it at 65, you'll know for certain that you're doing it for love.

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Oi youngsters! Work is a lovely buzz for a while. But most people will tire of it somewhere between 35 and 45. So even if you're loving it now best to bung some wonga aside. And if you're still doing it at 65, you'll know for certain that you're doing it for love.

...or necessity...

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Happy birthday drained!!

Thankyou,my 30th was spent in a gogo bar in Bangkok, 40th on HPC whilst eating some Butterkist popcorn ... something went wrong in the last 10 years.

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Oi youngsters! Work is a lovely buzz for a while. But most people will tire of it somewhere between 35 and 45.

For me, work lost its charm about a couple of weeks after I started. I went part time about 5 years after starting post-graduate work.

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For me, work lost its charm about a couple of weeks after I started. I went part time about 5 years after starting post-graduate work.

If I did an office job for 40 years, I'd want to run for the hills..

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Yes, horses for courses innit.

Btw Frugal, I made money in 15 years in Japan.

And if you haven't got your health then you`ve got nothing. (had a `serious` stroke two years ago but completely recovered now, actually after two weeks)

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Early 40s. Planning to retire at 55 - but depends on job. If I still enjoy it, I'll stick with it.

What do all you guys do that you can retire so young and what are you doing on HPC (presumably you have your own home)?

When I started on HPC, house prices were going up faster than I could save so I decided I was going to do a few things (this was in my early 30s btw):

  • Wait for prices to drop
  • Go into frugal mode
  • Earn extra cash through experimenting with internet businesses

I realised early on that price drops weren't guaranteed, and that saving hard only gets you so far. Ultimately, you have to earn more money. The missus and I basically lived extremely frugally for close on a decade (even our wedding was under £500, and our honeymoon was camping, never had a car, etc). We were lucky enough that one of the internet experiments eventually paid off, and basically earned enough in a 3-4 years to buy a modest terrace house in a cheap area. Died down a lot since, but it gave us the help we needed. I will stress we would have got there a couple of years later through saving alone, but might have had to make more compromises on the place we ended up at.

I now put a high percentage of salary into my pension because we still live frugally, and it generally costs less to maintain a house than it does to rent one. Plus you can do stuff to it to reduce your other bills. The wood burning stove means we pay basically nowt for heating, and the solar panels produce hot water/most of our day time electricity about 7-8 months of the year.

Edited by StainlessSteelCat

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Early 40s. Planning to retire at 55 - but depends on job. If I still enjoy it, I'll stick with it.

When I started on HPC, house prices were going up faster than I could save so I decided I was going to do a few things (this was in my early 30s btw):

  • Wait for prices to drop
  • Go into frugal mode
  • Earn extra cash through experimenting with internet businesses

I realised early on that price drops weren't guaranteed, and that saving hard only gets you so far. Ultimately, you have to earn more money. The missus and I basically lived extremely frugally for close on a decade (even our wedding was under £500, and our honeymoon was camping, never had a car, etc). We were lucky enough that one of the internet experiments eventually paid off, and basically earned enough in a 3-4 years to buy a modest terrace house in a cheap area. Died down a lot since, but it gave us the help we needed.

I now put a high percentage of salary into my pension because we still live frugally, and it generally costs less to maintain a house than it does to rent one.

If you retire at 55, you could potentially live for another 30 years...what would you do, with effectively a third of your life left? I think its work that keeps an awful lot of people sane...

Edited by Dave Beans

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If you retire at 55, you could potentially live for another 30 years...what would you do, with effectively a third of your life left? I think its work that keeps an awful lot of people sane...

If you lived where I lived, and are an outdoors person - you would not need to ask that question. I have plenty of hobbies and interests, am an autodidact - and plan to use this next decade to explore a few more hobbies and interests prior to consider retiring. Also I shall be surprised if I make it to 85. My family is a long lived one, but chronic illness means I might not be beating any of their records. Although I have had fairly good health for the last quarter of a century I cannot guarantee I shall be so lucky for the next quarter. In some ways, I already consider myself in extra time.

Edited by StainlessSteelCat

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If you lived where I lived, and are an outdoors person - you would not need to ask that question. I have plenty of hobbies and interests, am an autodidact - and plan to use this next decade to explore a few more hobbies and interests prior to consider retiring. Also I shall be surprised if I make it to 85. My family is a long lived one, but chronic illness means I might not be beating any of their records. Although I have had fairly good health for the last quarter of a century I cannot guarantee I shall be so lucky for the next quarter. In some ways, I already consider myself in extra time.

I don't know where you live... :) Do hobbies give enough purpose to life?

Edited by Dave Beans

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I don't know where you live... :)

There are woods, mountains and beaches within five miles of here.

In answer to your other question. Depends on the nature of the hobbies I'd suggest. Some can just time passers, others have genuine purpose.

My current job is more of a calling than a job - and providing it remains so (and my employers still want me) - I'll likely stay as long as I can. But I have to have a plan B.

Edited by StainlessSteelCat

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For me, work lost its charm about a couple of weeks after I started. I went part time about 5 years after starting post-graduate work.

What took you so long, my first job was as a trainee welder/ fabricator and i remember thinking it was a living hell, done numberous jobs since and not liked any, the only difference being the better the pay packet made the job slightly more tolerable.

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