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SarahBell

Right To Sublet

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Given a landlord can have you out with 2 months notice on a whim I can't really see how it'd make much difference. You sublet, it's legal, landlord who disapproves gives you notice.

Edited by EUBanana

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The landlord can't regain possession with a Section 21 during the fixed term of the tenancy.

Yeah, you could sublet it for 6 max months I suppose.

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Might be aimed at stamping on abuses. Like agents or HMO landlords who want a veto on your girlfriend moving in, or even on your regular friends staying the weekend. Or the unconditional veto on moving out before the end of a fixed term without paying for the whole of it.

Might also have the unintended consequence of working best for those - both landlords and tenants - who are the most ruthless and abusive. Though that's a risk with more-or-less any law.

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Anecdotally I have heard of letting agents doing 'counts' during periodic inspections, e.g. how many toothbrushes, how many different sizes of shoes, etc., to see whether e.g. a 2 bed place that has supposedly been let to 2 sharers, is now home to two couples. I would guess this sort of sub-let is pretty common in expensive areas. From the LL's POV I suppose it means considerably more wear and tear, and boiler/washing machine having to work a lot harder than expected.

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...loads of rooms in homes are let for very little privately.....let during the week, mainly in London areas and on a short term basis when a job calls for people to move at short notice to different places all around the country for a short period of time......cuts out the middle men, fees and costs...win,win....what is there not to like? ;)

Comfortable room, space, peace and home cooking....

Edited by winkie

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...loads of rooms in homes are let for very little privately.....let during the week, mainly in London areas and on a short term basis when a job calls for people to move at short notice to different places all around the country for a short period of time......cuts out the middle men, fees and costs...win,win....what is there not to like? ;)

Comfortable room, space, peace and home cooking....

You can rent out a room to a lodger and get £4,250 a year tax free. Up until now, if you were renting the whole flat / house you had to get your landlord's permission. This would make it easier.

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So his work legally concerning HMO's i.e. fire alarms etc....... landlord doesn't want to follow/bother with HMO laws so he rents to a single individual who then sublets to others....who is responsible legally regarding HMO law?....landlord simply says 'Not me Gov (t)...here look at the tenancy agreement, I am only letting to a single individual'.....also what happens if the rental is including council tax, landlord gets a single person discount but house is HMO?

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What is the rationale behind this? Why would the rentier party do anything that would be negative for landlords and help tenants? There must be some kind of catch?

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So his work legally concerning HMO's i.e. fire alarms etc....... landlord doesn't want to follow/bother with HMO laws so he rents to a single individual who then sublets to others....who is responsible legally regarding HMO law?....landlord simply says 'Not me Gov (t)...here look at the tenancy agreement, I am only letting to a single individual'.....also what happens if the rental is including council tax, landlord gets a single person discount but house is HMO?

Simples!

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So his work legally concerning HMO's i.e. fire alarms etc....... landlord doesn't want to follow/bother with HMO laws so he rents to a single individual who then sublets to others....who is responsible legally regarding HMO law?....landlord simply says 'Not me Gov (t)...here look at the tenancy agreement, I am only letting to a single individual'.....also what happens if the rental is including council tax, landlord gets a single person discount but house is HMO?

A single person can have two lodgers without the flat / house becoming an HMO. So a tenant subletting two rooms to singles or a room to a couple is not subject to HMO rules. And the tenant is responsible for council tax if the flat / house isn't an HMO.

So yes, it looks as if it does let the landlord off at least two hooks.

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No whim required. s21, bye. Same as abolishing revenge evictions .... s21, bye .... need to wait a few months? OK s21, bye and no reference.

If you keep paying the rent, it is not easy for a landlord to forcibly evict you, even with a s.21.

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Are you sure about that?...I thought that if you were in breach of any of the terms of the lease he/she had the right to serve notice.

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What is the rationale behind this? Why would the rentier party do anything that would be negative for landlords and help tenants? There must be some kind of catch?

It is not to help tenants. It is to keep rents high. Can't afford your rent, well rent out a room.

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