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longtomsilver

Children Farming.

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Anecdotally, I started a new job last week barman in a busy centre of town pub (chain) which works for me as this fits in with my house husbandry role. Friday, Saturday nights to 3-4am and ad - hoc shifts midweek 10am-2.30pm (done one today). My zero hour contract has been upped already from a minimum of 12 hours a week to 30 which I'm reducing asap as it was unasked for.

Unsurprisingly, I'm working with lots of late teen/twenty somethings all of whom live at home with their parents and a hot topic among themselves is how skint they are... at the end of induction training I dug deep and bought a round of drinks as they had just about enough money for a bus fare home on them. They all worked, either moving job (retail is dire apparently and esp. jumped up floor managers) or taking on a 2nd or 3rd job just to make ends meet. I felt compelled to ask where their money went and they all unanimously told me board and lodging was by far their biggest financial drain costing between £50-65 a week with some parents providing only lodging. This sticks in my craw. Children on what are effectively zero hour, minimum wage contracts being farmed for cash by their fleecing parents.

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Anecdotally, I started a new job last week barman in a busy centre of town pub (chain) which works for me as this fits in with my house husbandry role. Friday, Saturday nights to 3-4am and ad - hoc shifts midweek 10am-2.30pm (done one today). My zero hour contract has been upped already from a minimum of 12 hours a week to 30 which I'm reducing asap as it was unasked for.

Unsurprisingly, I'm working with lots of late teen/twenty somethings all of whom live at home with their parents and a hot topic among themselves is how skint they are... at the end of induction training I dug deep and bought a round of drinks as they had just about enough money for a bus fare home on them. They all worked, either moving job (retail is dire apparently and esp. jumped up floor managers) or taking on a 2nd or 3rd job just to make ends meet. I felt compelled to ask where their money went and they all unanimously told me board and lodging was by far their biggest financial drain costing between £50-65 a week with some parents providing only lodging. This sticks in my craw. Children on what are effectively zero hour, minimum wage contracts being farmed for cash by their fleecing parents.

If they're late teenagers, their parents may not even be 40 years old, so not exactly the boomers which are decried on this forum - they may well have mortgages on overprice property or even renting. When I started work at 16 in '87 I was taking home £100 a week and gave my mum £40 a week - it was just to help the household (and I ate like a king!). I'm not doing a pythonesque "in my day", but I suspect they spunk their money up on superdry gear and phone contracts - but I do agree the zero hours contract is a piece of sh!t

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Anecdotally, I started a new job last week barman in a busy centre of town pub (chain) which works for me as this fits in with my house husbandry role. Friday, Saturday nights to 3-4am and ad - hoc shifts midweek 10am-2.30pm (done one today). My zero hour contract has been upped already from a minimum of 12 hours a week to 30 which I'm reducing asap as it was unasked for.

Unsurprisingly, I'm working with lots of late teen/twenty somethings all of whom live at home with their parents and a hot topic among themselves is how skint they are... at the end of induction training I dug deep and bought a round of drinks as they had just about enough money for a bus fare home on them. They all worked, either moving job (retail is dire apparently and esp. jumped up floor managers) or taking on a 2nd or 3rd job just to make ends meet. I felt compelled to ask where their money went and they all unanimously told me board and lodging was by far their biggest financial drain costing between £50-65 a week with some parents providing only lodging. This sticks in my craw. Children on what are effectively zero hour, minimum wage contracts being farmed for cash by their fleecing parents.

Do you find them to be a far cry from the "youth of today" denigrations of popular myth? In my experience they're far more switched on and motivated than I ever was (or indeed was required to be) at that age.

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I think you will find that a caring parent will make their offspring pay for stuff as soon as they can. Call it tough love. They now know the value of a safe place to sleep. It's one of life's hard slaps, but one we all remember. Hopefully they can take the £60 per week, make it £100 per week and then move out!

It's not stealing from your children, it's educating them.

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Do you find them to be a far cry from the "youth of today" denigrations of popular myth? In my experience they're far more switched on and motivated than I ever was (or indeed was required to be) at that age.

That 'youth of today' meme is busted, I never believed it anyway, the people I now work with are proof of that. iPhones certainly, not the latest and mostly PAYG (I had to tether my phone so one could go on-line to add me as a friend on bookface(felt obliged). Intelligent people and pleasant too.

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I think you will find that a caring parent will make their offspring pay for stuff as soon as they can. Call it tough love. They now know the value of a safe place to sleep. It's one of life's hard slaps, but one we all remember. Hopefully they can take the £60 per week, make it £100 per week and then move out!

It's not stealing from your children, it's educating them.

It's a lame education when your children are stuck between a rock and a hard place. Have you seen the cost of houses lately, either to rent or to buy?

This lesson needs to be archived IMO until such a time when balance is restored I.e. A correction.

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If they're late teenagers, their parents may not even be 40 years old, so not exactly the boomers which are decried on this forum - they may well have mortgages on overprice property or even renting. When I started work at 16 in '87 I was taking home £100 a week and gave my mum £40 a week - it was just to help the household (and I ate like a king!). I'm not doing a pythonesque "in my day", but I suspect they spunk their money up on superdry gear and phone contracts - but I do agree the zero hours contract is a piece of sh!t

My dad and his brothers tipped up everything and got an allowance. Their sister got to keep her wages cause she was saving up for a wedding.

How the world has changed in such a short time.

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My view is that those who are aged late teens/early 20's are not children any more...they have entered adulthood. Being a member of this site I am aware that many of those in that age group don't have great life prospects regarding decent paid jobs and having a home. It all depends on each individual's life position and an element of luck IMO.

However I do think it's important that all young people, whatever their circumstances, are made aware that basic living has costs. That's the reality!

I do know that some parents use their earning offspring to fund their own personal spending habits whatever that may be. However I would hope that the majority of parents are trying to educate their offspring about life and using dig money for basic living and extras for the household. Hasn't it always been so for the masses?

Personally, if I was financially able, I would save dig money from my son for his future but it's not an option. Until recently he was earning £75 pw and he paid £10 pw digs. Now he's 21 and lucky to be earning between £300-£500 pw. Our agreement is that weekly digs which includes everything are somewhere between £50-£70. Some weeks by agreement it's less and some weeks unprompted he's said here's a bit extra. My expectation is that he will save for his future and so far he seems to be doing that.

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My view is that those who are aged late teens/early 20's are not children any more...they have entered adulthood. Being a member of this site I am aware that many of those in that age group don't have great life prospects regarding decent paid jobs and having a home. It all depends on each individual's life position and an element of luck IMO.

However I do think it's important that all young people, whatever their circumstances, are made aware that basic living has costs. That's the reality!

I do know that some parents use their earning offspring to fund their own personal spending habits whatever that may be. However I would hope that the majority of parents are trying to educate their offspring about life and using dig money for basic living and extras for the household. Hasn't it always been so for the masses?

Personally, if I was financially able, I would save dig money from my son for his future but it's not an option. Until recently he was earning £75 pw and he paid £10 pw digs. Now he's 21 and lucky to be earning between £300-£500 pw. Our agreement is that weekly digs which includes everything are somewhere between £50-£70. Some weeks by agreement it's less and some weeks unprompted he's said here's a bit extra. My expectation is that he will save for his future and so far he seems to be doing that.

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Do you find them to be a far cry from the "youth of today" denigrations of popular myth? In my experience they're far more switched on and motivated than I ever was (or indeed was required to be) at that age.

My limited experience of the youth of today is that they are better in many respects than my generation. The young generation in my family are certainly better behaved than I and my contemporaries were.

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I agree the young of today are hard workers and for many their life chances are p*ss poor. To be fair, there were instances of that in the past too - parts of the 80s were terrible for the young with high unemployment levels.

Regarding contributions to parents, the key here is proportionate. If you are earning £100-£200/week - then bunging your parents £50 for board doesn't feel that mean for a late teen/early 20 something as you have few real expenses at that age. Admittedly there are more choices nowadays, and more things to nibble away at your money - like the mobile phone - and a phone is pretty much an essential now.

But I was very frugal as a youngster - and not everyone wants to live like that. Even with my brief spell on the dole after Uni I felt I had plenty of cash because it was perfectly possible to go without spending anything for weeks (bar giving my parents some cash). The only exception was one trip to the pub, where the group took pity on me and said I didn't have to pay for a round (which would have admittedly crippled me cash wise). I didn't bother going to the pub again after that until I was earning a decent wedge.

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When I started work at 16 in '87 I was taking home £100 a week and gave my mum £40 a week

Apprentice rate in the UK in 2015 is £2.73 per hour. That's £109pw for a 40 hour week. They are earning the same as you did in nominal terms 28 years later.

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Apprentice rate in the UK in 2015 is £2.73 per hour. That's £109pw for a 40 hour week. They are earning the same as you did in nominal terms 28 years later.

I wasn't an apprentice - just an office junior

Students earn nothing

I was lucky to land that job and it served me well. It was at the same time as YTS, but i didn't think YTS stacking shelves was useful

People make their choices - if apprentice pay is p!ss poor it is up to the individual to decide whether it is worth taking up. Technical college doesn't pay anything, but come out as a qualified electrician and I would say the money is relatively good and work plentiful in this climate

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It is good that regular housekeeping is taken if living at home £50 to £100 per week depending.....if the parents can afford to, or want to they could secretly put it away for them, to be presented with it at a latter date, helping them out with future housing costs. ;)

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I wasn't an apprentice - just an office junior

Students earn nothing

I was lucky to land that job and it served me well. It was at the same time as YTS, but i didn't think YTS stacking shelves was useful

People make their choices - if apprentice pay is p!ss poor it is up to the individual to decide whether it is worth taking up. Technical college doesn't pay anything, but come out as a qualified electrician and I would say the money is relatively good and work plentiful in this climate

There are 850,000 people working as apprentices and earning £109pw for a 40 hour week in the UK right now. Some of those are training to become electricians. The £19k-£22k that a newly qualified electrician can expect to earn is probably worth about 50% more in purchasing power than the £100pw you were making as an unskilled 16 year old office junior.

You are right that people make their choices, but the choices available to people who are young now are very poor.

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There are 850,000 people working as apprentices and earning £109pw for a 40 hour week in the UK right now. Some of those are training to become electricians. The £19k-£22k that a newly qualified electrician can expect to earn is probably worth about 50% more in purchasing power than the £100pw you were making as an unskilled 16 year old office junior.

You are right that people make their choices, but the choices available to people who are young now are very poor.

I am not dismissing the plight of young 'uns nor disagreeing with you.

With wage arbitrage and uk housing costs, the living and career choices for just about everyone who is not a property owner or have an established well paid job with prospects, have few choices to achieving a wage that will allow them a decent family home and standard of living.

Apologies if I've mentioned houseprices in off topic

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There are 850,000 people working as apprentices and earning £109pw for a 40 hour week in the UK right now.

For reference, I earned more than that as an engineering apprentice....

.....in 1990.

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Second six hour shift completed and £12 in tips to go with last week's £6 and a further shift tomorrow for a tight wad doing this as a hobby job I'm starting to enjoy this :D night all

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I moved out of home at 16 because I didn't get on with my step father. I didn't have to go, but I wanted to.

I claimed income support for 18 months whilst I bunked off college, then worked in meat packing factories - that taught me a thing or two early on in life. At times it was a toss up between living on value frozen mince or two litres of white lightening. You absolutely need these lessons early in life to teach you the value of money and what it's like living at the bottom.

Living at home with your parents doing your laundry, making dinner etc. is a luxury and I think it does young people more harm than good. I have several friends who lived back at home into their late 20's after finishing uni, they are still quite useless to this day and unable to fend for themselves, do simple DIY tasks, cook and simply lack basic life skills that I picked up early in life.

Admittedly it was hard having no parental support from a young age and I still resent my mother and step father for giving me absolutely no help even when at times being faced with homelessness. Treating young people like that is not productive.

Essentially here's a 50cc moped, now piss off.

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