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London Affordability Angst Now On Billboards

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'Nobody My Age Can Afford to Stay Here Forever' London billboards are sharing the stories of people moving both to and from the rapidly changing city. Some of them are quite painful to read.

Why do people choose to move to London? And why do they choose to leave? A new project exploring these questions is currently playing out in an unlikely venue—two advertising billboards in the center of the U.K.’s capital. Called London is Changing, the project is run through a website that invites people who are moving into, out of, or across London to share the reasons and emotions behind their migration. These messages are then displayed on the billboards, hopefully giving passers-by pause for thought as they walk or drive.

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more here...

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Guest Jemmy Button

London is a place full of miserable people living shallow lives that they've read about in glossy magazines. The place is crammed with BTL slumlords and money obsessed people in shiny suits. It's all very well having billboards up, London people should be rioting!

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I have sympathy with the many younger Londoners.....people who were born and bred, have family there and where London is all they know and love having to make practical living choices and find they have no other choice but to leave......London's loss is another places gain.....they will not regret it.

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Supply and demand.

Looks like the demand is strong ....

Everyone Wants To Work In London

When the Boston Consulting Group polled more than 200,000 people in 189 countries, London trounced the rest of the world when it came to where they would move to work. Unprompted, 16% of respondents said they’d move to the city, well clear of New York’s 12.2%.

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That’s not entirely surprising when you look at London’s demographic makeup. Three million of London’s eight million inhabitants were born outside of the UK. In fact, the non-UK born population makes up 105% of the city's population growth between the 2001 and 2011 census. (Why 105%? Because native Brits left, causing negative growth, and the immigrants more than eclipsed that.)

What’s more, the eurozone’s dismal growth prospects and eye-watering youth unemployment rates mean this trend likely isn’t going to slow any time soon.

There have been major increases in the number of people moving to the UK from the rest of Europe. In 2007-08, 15,400 Italians registered to work in the UK, a figure that was up to 44,110 by 2013. Europe’s young workforce is increasingly migrating to the UK (where they don’t need visas to live and work), and a huge number find their way to London. One of the most well-educated generations in history is streaming to London to live and work, and that's an enormous benefit to the city.

And Everyone Wants To Live Here Too

London reigns at the top of Knight Frank’s global wealth report in 2014. Endless anecdotes in the reports show exactly where the world's wealthiest people want to own homes, and the British capital comes out ahead of New York.

The cost of buying and renting is something that makes Londoners want to weep: but it's a side effect of the city's incredible success.

In 2012-13, 49% of buyers in London's prime central market were not British, illustrating the huge demand from abroad. And they're not just buying to hold property as an investment: only 28% of buyers live outside the UK, showing that a huge number of international buyers want to live in the city.

http://uk.businessinsider.com/sorry-new-york-london-is-the-world-capital-city-2014-10

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Guest

Anything which gets the message out that a lot of people are p****d off with house prices is fine in my book. Nicely timed with all the indicators starting to show the deflating London market.

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It's just amazing that they didn't arrive at that conclusion 10 or more years ago.

Or 30 years ago when I fled the place.

The difference back then was, we didn't have the mindset of mass communication back then. We were consumers of, not active participants in, the media that existed back then.

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Everyone Wants To Work In London

So did I when I graduated. It sounds like a lot of fun, until you experience the reality.

And as for that list, it seems to include some truly ghastly places. Rome may be great to visit, but not to live (that's from experience living there several years). Brussels or Dublin, no fear (that's from having visited several times). Surely Los Angeles' inclusion must be down to romantic images of Hollywood?

[edit to add] Actually I expect a lot of those European cities were selected as proxies for their country. E.g. I wouldn't want to live in Dublin, but would consider other Irish cities.

Edited by porca misèria

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London is partly populated by very very wealthy people. Who need servants. Not slavery type...no...... but they need flowers delivering, need streets to be spotlessly clean, need shops full of the latest greatest rarest most-premium trinkets. They need drivers to take them about ,people to shout at, minions to control. "Staff" to do their bidding.

If you are coming to London to be elite, you can forget it. Thats not gonna happen (withouth a serious amount of millions backing you up)

Nay, be honest with yourself, you're coming here to be a servant to the super wealthy...you're going to do your small bit to feed that machine with what it needs. It could work out ok for you..depending on how you look at it, but dont kid yourself that you arent just a tool for the system.

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I was commenting to some London people the other day that it's hard to feel sorry for them, when they always are only concerned with London, and what happens there. One went on a London centric march about rent prices. When I said it's these things that annoy me about London: they only ever have concerns about London, high rental prices affect all of the UK, high house prices are forcing unsustainable levels of debt onto young people and that if they started marching for the UK I'd be interested. The reply was, well let's sort out London first and then it'll be easier to sort out the rest of the country.

I moved away 5 years ago and I genuinely couldn't be happier, apart from the insane prices round these parts.

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Has a ripple effect too. People commute from cambridge because they cant afford London. Which in turn forces the people who work in Cambridge to live in the sticks.

All of which means massive amount of time and money and energy wasted commuting, and building associated infrastructure.

Solve Londons housing crisis and you solve the entire south easts.

Of course, its pointless doing anything with immigration running at the levels it is.

Edited by Executive Sadman

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Tagline: Who Cares.

Im kind of split...on the one hand it is disgusting how much HB goes to London, the last thing I want to see is more of it directed there. Without it, employers would have to pay a rate of wages that reflects the true cost of living there, unsubsidized by the rest of the country.

Something like 1/3rd of London's residents are foreign nationals (that in 2011, probably nearer 40% now)...no reason that wouldnt increase if housing were made more affordable there...but I suspect the authors of this marketing wouldn't even entertain such an idea. Endless demand and limited supply, doing nothing about the demand side and only limited action on the supply side wont fix anything.

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Seems to me London is now simply:

a. a playground for the international super rich, who can live anywhere and don't need to work,

b. a job centre for any reasonably intelligent European who can get a job in financial services for a few years

c. a job centre for minimum wage European workers who cater to the above for a few years

Most of the others are students, benefit scroungers, council flat dwellers or have inherited property or bought it before the boom.

On the radio somebody said eventually there will be a tipping point where people who don't fit into those categories will colonise another city, effectively leading to a second English capital city. I'm not so sure as I think the London diaspora will simply move abroad, become cyber-commuters at home or just be absorbed into other cities in Britain without turning one of them into an alternative capital.

Edited by Austin Allegro

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On the radio somebody said eventually there will be a tipping point where people who don't fit into those categories will colonise another city, effectively leading to a second English capital city. I'm not so sure as I think the London diaspora will simply move abroad, become cyber-commuters at home or just be absorbed into other cities in Britain without turning one of them into an alternative capital.

True. Welcome to the 'Northern Powerhouse!'

Creating a "northern powerhouse" is vital but it should not come at the expense of a "diminished" London, Chancellor George Osborne has said.

He stressed that rebalancing the UK economy was a government ambition but said it should not be achieved by "pulling down" the capital city. He set out his economic vision for the north west in a speech in Manchester. Labour said the city had paid "a heavy price" for the government's "failed" economic plan.

The chancellor and the prime minister addressed an audience of business leaders in Manchester, during the start of a two-day visit to the north-west of England. Mr Osborne said: "Rebalancing our national economy, ensuring that the economic future of the north is as bright, if not brighter, than other parts of the UK, is the ambition we should set ourselves. We achieve that not by pulling down our capital city, or diminishing its success. Having one of the greatest global cities on earth, located 200 miles to our south, should be an asset, not a weakness."

The chancellor restated the government's objective of creating a "northern powerhouse of jobs, investment, prosperity and bright futures". He said closing the economic gap between north and south would bring more than £18bn to the region by 2030. Mr Osborne and David Cameron also promised to create 100,000 more jobs in the region, and to invest in transport. Mr Cameron said a strong UK economy depended on no part of the country being "left behind", as he pushed the plan for a so-called northern powerhouse.

Lucy Powell, Labour's general election co-ordinator and Manchester Central MP, said no-one would be fooled by the prime minister's "weasel words", saying living standards had fallen across Manchester since 2010. Labour has promised to devolve £30bn of spending to the English regions to boost economic growth outside London.

Lib Dem Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg has said Manchester, Leeds and Sheffield should become a "Northern golden triangle" to drive economic growth in the north of England.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-30730632

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I was commenting to some London people the other day that it's hard to feel sorry for them, when they always are only concerned with London, and what happens there. One went on a London centric march about rent prices. When I said it's these things that annoy me about London: they only ever have concerns about London, high rental prices affect all of the UK, high house prices are forcing unsustainable levels of debt onto young people and that if they started marching for the UK I'd be interested. The reply was, well let's sort out London first and then it'll be easier to sort out the rest of the country.

I moved away 5 years ago and I genuinely couldn't be happier, apart from the insane prices round these parts.

It's culturally and economically baked in. London weighting, London living wage. It gets my goat having endured living in another expensive place like Oxford (hopefully moving soon). It isn't all about London.

In my book, London should just become a city state, and the rest of us could be rid of them. You may say I'm a dreamer etc. ;-)

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LOL at the 'Northern powerhouse'. It sounds like twaddle to me. The problem is there isn't any other large city remotely like London in the whole of the UK, ie one with culture, good architecture, pleasant suburbs etc. If there was it would have become a clear rival to London long ago.

People who are used to London don't want to live in places like Birmingham, Manchester, Liverpool etc. I'm not knocking those places, but they are not comparable to London. If you look at France you have 'rivals' to Paris like Lyons and Marseilles. In Germany you have Frankfurt, Munich, Stuttgart to rival Berlin. In Spain you have Barcelona, Bilbao and Seville as alternatives to Madrid.

The nearest equivalent to London we have is Edinburgh or just possibly Cardiff or Bristol, but I don't hold out much hope for them.

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The Northern powerhouse plan seems to consist of a fast train line from Liverpool, through Manchester and Leeds/Bradford and on to the ports at Hull, with the Sheffield area as a bit of an afterthought.

I think France is just as capital-centric if not more so, and let's not forget that Barcelona wants independence from Madrid.

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