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Digsby

One In Three Houses Do Not Sell...

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...in E17.

I was looking at the RM Market Trends the other day, and it occurred to me for the first time to compare the 2 charts - how many properties were marketed in a given month versus how many were sold.

I was surprised to find out how low the sold number was in comparison (usually way less than half). I double checked the LR, wondering whether this sold number was perhaps the number that were sold which had been marketed by RM - but no, these are the LR figures.

So if we take Oct 2014 for E17, 940 properties were marketed on RM, but only 108 properties were sold in that area that month - that's 11%. I don't know what RM's market share is, but I doubt it is 100%, so you can bet that there were actually more than 940 properties for sale that month in E17 - so 11% is that maximum and the real figure likely lower.

If you look through the history, 11% is unusually low - in 2008 territory. But even in Q1 2007 the figure was only 30%. That's less than one in three houses on the market actually selling. And prices are supposedly rising forever because we have a shortage of houses on the market!?

It then occurred to me, if the sold numbers are so much lower than the marketed numbers, there should be a huge build up in stock on the market, but there isn't. Clearly some are being taken off the market after not selling. Since I know how many were on the market in a given month, how many of those were new, and how many sold, I can calculate how many were taken off the market.

This number also floats around the one third mark, so that it one in three properties that cannot be sold (at a price the seller can agree on of course).

That leaves another third, roughly, that are left on the market unsold. Presumably these churn over every few years, so eventually they are either sold or taken off the market, and replaced with something else that's not selling.

One thing is clear to me about all of this (and I already thought this, expressed on other threads, but had no hard evidence), we absolutely do not have a shortage of houses for sale in a market where so few of those that are, sell. And yet, prices continue to climb, on the whole. Something is very wrong with this market.

It took me a couple of hours to produce the stats for E17. I wondered what the pattern looked like elsewhere. So I wrote some software to pull up the data for a postal code outcode and compile a report.

Here are the stats for E17 below. If you'd like me to produce one for your outcode area, let me know and I will post it. It only takes a few seconds.

Market Trends for E172007: Marketed: 4748, New: 4164, Removed: 1763 (37.13%), Sold: 2031 (42.78%), Average: £232,159.002008: Marketed: 4370, New: 3477, Removed: 2735 (62.59%), Sold: 955 (21.85%), Average: £224,871.002009: Marketed: 2519, New: 1885, Removed: 1368 (54.31%), Sold: 796 (31.60%), Average: £204,951.002010: Marketed: 3013, New: 2547, Removed: 1305 (43.31%), Sold: 799 (26.52%), Average: £222,313.002011: Marketed: 2876, New: 2028, Removed: 1331 (46.28%), Sold: 992 (34.49%), Average: £227,131.002012: Marketed: 2464, New: 1846, Removed: 982 (39.85%), Sold: 965 (39.16%), Average: £243,041.002013: Marketed: 2758, New: 2265, Removed: 1282 (46.48%), Sold: 1126 (40.83%), Average: £278,627.002014: Marketed: 2980, New: 2618, Removed: 1008 (33.83%), Sold: 1144 (38.39%), Average: £343,910.00Q1 2007: Marketed: 1547, New: 963, Removed: 285 (18.42%), Sold: 453 (29.28%), Average: £220,875.00Q2 2007: Marketed: 1882, New: 1252, Removed: 494 (26.25%), Sold: 548 (29.12%), Average: £230,373.00Q3 2007: Marketed: 1908, New: 1082, Removed: 436 (22.85%), Sold: 603 (31.60%), Average: £238,431.00Q4 2007: Marketed: 1684, New: 867, Removed: 548 (32.54%), Sold: 427 (25.36%), Average: £238,958.00Q1 2008: Marketed: 2083, New: 1190, Removed: 563 (27.03%), Sold: 281 (13.49%), Average: £238,677.00Q2 2008: Marketed: 2193, New: 1144, Removed: 815 (37.16%), Sold: 259 (11.81%), Average: £234,849.00Q3 2008: Marketed: 1849, New: 758, Removed: 787 (42.56%), Sold: 229 (12.39%), Average: £220,363.00Q4 2008: Marketed: 1321, New: 385, Removed: 570 (43.15%), Sold: 186 (14.08%), Average: £205,594.00Q1 2009: Marketed: 1097, New: 463, Removed: 399 (36.37%), Sold: 154 (14.04%), Average: £196,248.00Q2 2009: Marketed: 1075, New: 530, Removed: 425 (39.53%), Sold: 161 (14.98%), Average: £198,951.00Q3 2009: Marketed: 916, New: 489, Removed: 294 (32.10%), Sold: 239 (26.09%), Average: £210,989.00Q4 2009: Marketed: 799, New: 403, Removed: 250 (31.29%), Sold: 242 (30.29%), Average: £213,618.00Q1 2010: Marketed: 1154, New: 688, Removed: 195 (16.90%), Sold: 149 (12.91%), Average: £226,502.00Q2 2010: Marketed: 1418, New: 763, Removed: 461 (32.51%), Sold: 157 (11.07%), Average: £214,041.00Q3 2010: Marketed: 1535, New: 631, Removed: 239 (15.57%), Sold: 263 (17.13%), Average: £229,455.00Q4 2010: Marketed: 1410, New: 465, Removed: 410 (29.08%), Sold: 230 (16.31%), Average: £219,255.00Q1 2011: Marketed: 1397, New: 549, Removed: 302 (21.62%), Sold: 207 (14.82%), Average: £219,245.00Q2 2011: Marketed: 1387, New: 606, Removed: 418 (30.14%), Sold: 206 (14.85%), Average: £230,639.00Q3 2011: Marketed: 1345, New: 524, Removed: 271 (20.15%), Sold: 296 (22.01%), Average: £229,963.00Q4 2011: Marketed: 1131, New: 349, Removed: 340 (30.06%), Sold: 283 (25.02%), Average: £228,675.00Q1 2012: Marketed: 1070, New: 452, Removed: 211 (19.72%), Sold: 244 (22.80%), Average: £222,185.00Q2 2012: Marketed: 1086, New: 551, Removed: 339 (31.22%), Sold: 181 (16.67%), Average: £246,822.00Q3 2012: Marketed: 1003, New: 468, Removed: 239 (23.83%), Sold: 273 (27.22%), Average: £256,605.00Q4 2012: Marketed: 922, New: 375, Removed: 193 (20.93%), Sold: 267 (28.96%), Average: £246,554.00Q1 2013: Marketed: 1013, New: 520, Removed: 239 (23.59%), Sold: 214 (21.13%), Average: £250,228.00Q2 2013: Marketed: 1079, New: 619, Removed: 408 (37.81%), Sold: 253 (23.45%), Average: £263,676.00Q3 2013: Marketed: 1020, New: 609, Removed: 298 (29.22%), Sold: 309 (30.29%), Average: £298,065.00Q4 2013: Marketed: 957, New: 517, Removed: 337 (35.21%), Sold: 350 (36.57%), Average: £302,539.00Q1 2014: Marketed: 1001, New: 639, Removed: 178 (17.78%), Sold: 353 (35.26%), Average: £314,293.00Q2 2014: Marketed: 1246, New: 858, Removed: 310 (24.88%), Sold: 337 (27.05%), Average: £327,881.00Q3 2014: Marketed: 1433, New: 874, Removed: 388 (27.08%), Sold: 346 (24.15%), Average: £378,233.00Q4 2014: Marketed: 940, New: 247, Removed: 132 (14.04%), Sold: 108 (11.49%), Average: £377,875.00Nov 2014: Marketed: 864.0, New: 179.0, Removed: 147 (17.01%), Sold: ?Dec 2014: Marketed: 721.0, New: 121.0, Removed: ?, Sold: ?Jan 2015: Marketed: 804.0, New: 244.0, Removed: ?, Sold: ?

The sold data only goes up to October of course. So the 2014 line above, and the Q4 2014 lines are not complete, and the final 3 months cannot be calculated yet, so show what data is missing. The average prices are averages of averages, and only intended to show the direction of the market.

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Great Crash 1 (from these figures) has so far been

a) down by £20k

B) and then rising a further £140k till today.

who has this money? where is it coming from? wages are almost static for this last decade by comparison. Not being sarcastic, I honestly cannot understand it. Especially E17, especially with the majority of these houses being actually a bit "shitty" (oh...3rd bedroom? dont you mean "enhanced broom closet"??)

OP, would love to see IG4 and IG5 for this time period please

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It's very obvious that the rightmove, time on the market survey, has a survival bias. Taking that survey at face value, it looks like a house can be sold in about 8 weeks on average.

In reality taking four properties, one may indeed sell in say 4 weeks and another in 12 weeks, hitting the average. Then you will get one that is on for a year, and then magically gets churned to a new agent...so off the survey. A second may give up.

So you have 120 weeks listings and only two sales...more like your 11% per month chance of a sale. Rightmove only tracks a property to its sale and then declares it only takes 8 weeks to sell a house, totally ignoring churns and total deletions.

The reality is, it is damn difficult to sell a house.

Edited by crashmonitor

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Its a false market. Fixed for those that have cash, or those that earn enough to get a mortgage, along with their deposit to cover a purchase price. It`s a market that is closing in on itself. It is an extreme pyramid, and the few buyers who are still playing the game obviously do not see what is coming.

So the price indexis, do indeed show that in some areas prices are going up. They are meaningless for the majority of the population in this country who have now decided either freely, or through capitulation to wait and see.

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It's utterly bizarre, totally dysfunctional. Seems to be that whenever the removed percentage is greater than the sold percentage, prices go up, and vice versa. The *only* people that high prices help is those downsizing, or exiting. It helps EA's, lenders, and the inland revenue to an extent, but then hurts when they exceed affordability. I just don't understand why, when a seller only receives offers £30k below asking price, they don't just offer £30k less on the property they are buying. Why choose to just take it off the market and remain stuck with an "unsellable" property, especially where they are upsizing, and waiting for prices to increase just means they will pay more in the future.

If buyers just did their research and saw that they have the upper hand in a market where so few properties actually sell, they'd realize that the power to save themselves money and end this madness is in their hands.

Market Trends for IG42007: Marketed: 366, New: 295, Removed: 96 (26.23%), Sold: 168 (45.90%), Average: £313,323.002008: Marketed: 340, New: 249, Removed: 172 (50.59%), Sold: 84 (24.71%), Average: £309,341.002009: Marketed: 265, New: 165, Removed: 126 (47.55%), Sold: 76 (28.68%), Average: £281,231.002010: Marketed: 244, New: 189, Removed: 94 (38.52%), Sold: 59 (24.18%), Average: £285,309.002011: Marketed: 270, New: 188, Removed: 135 (50.00%), Sold: 72 (26.67%), Average: £303,296.002012: Marketed: 228, New: 158, Removed: 94 (41.23%), Sold: 84 (36.84%), Average: £330,098.002013: Marketed: 212, New: 160, Removed: 103 (48.58%), Sold: 76 (35.85%), Average: £328,267.002014: Marketed: 184, New: 147, Removed: 47 (25.54%), Sold: 87 (47.28%), Average: £346,771.00Q1 2007: Marketed: 152, New: 81, Removed: 18 (11.84%), Sold: 50 (32.89%), Average: £314,576.00Q2 2007: Marketed: 160, New: 86, Removed: 48 (30.00%), Sold: 35 (21.88%), Average: £280,578.00Q3 2007: Marketed: 152, New: 68, Removed: 26 (17.11%), Sold: 52 (34.21%), Average: £337,866.00Q4 2007: Marketed: 143, New: 60, Removed: 4 (2.80%), Sold: 31 (21.68%), Average: £320,273.00Q1 2008: Marketed: 167, New: 76, Removed: 34 (20.36%), Sold: 30 (17.96%), Average: £326,004.00Q2 2008: Marketed: 169, New: 68, Removed: 41 (24.26%), Sold: 27 (15.98%), Average: £306,626.00Q3 2008: Marketed: 171, New: 64, Removed: 40 (23.39%), Sold: 19 (11.11%), Average: £297,583.00Q4 2008: Marketed: 143, New: 41, Removed: 57 (39.86%), Sold: 8 (5.59%), Average: £307,152.00Q1 2009: Marketed: 139, New: 39, Removed: 36 (25.90%), Sold: 11 (7.91%), Average: £282,395.00Q2 2009: Marketed: 113, New: 41, Removed: 44 (38.94%), Sold: 18 (15.93%), Average: £289,127.00Q3 2009: Marketed: 113, New: 49, Removed: 10 (8.85%), Sold: 24 (21.24%), Average: £257,125.00Q4 2009: Marketed: 98, New: 36, Removed: 36 (36.73%), Sold: 23 (23.47%), Average: £296,277.00Q1 2010: Marketed: 91, New: 36, Removed: 18 (19.78%), Sold: 9 (9.89%), Average: £274,583.00Q2 2010: Marketed: 127, New: 72, Removed: 24 (18.90%), Sold: 18 (14.17%), Average: £248,095.00Q3 2010: Marketed: 137, New: 41, Removed: 25 (18.25%), Sold: 20 (14.60%), Average: £298,871.00Q4 2010: Marketed: 129, New: 40, Removed: 27 (20.93%), Sold: 12 (9.30%), Average: £319,690.00Q1 2011: Marketed: 126, New: 44, Removed: 37 (29.37%), Sold: 17 (13.49%), Average: £316,993.00Q2 2011: Marketed: 117, New: 48, Removed: 36 (30.77%), Sold: 13 (11.11%), Average: £279,141.00Q3 2011: Marketed: 136, New: 61, Removed: 28 (20.59%), Sold: 23 (16.91%), Average: £293,952.00Q4 2011: Marketed: 118, New: 35, Removed: 34 (28.81%), Sold: 19 (16.10%), Average: £323,099.00Q1 2012: Marketed: 113, New: 43, Removed: 30 (26.55%), Sold: 22 (19.47%), Average: £278,423.00Q2 2012: Marketed: 95, New: 32, Removed: 25 (26.32%), Sold: 19 (20.00%), Average: £337,172.00Q3 2012: Marketed: 94, New: 46, Removed: 6 (6.38%), Sold: 24 (25.53%), Average: £357,782.00Q4 2012: Marketed: 87, New: 37, Removed: 33 (37.93%), Sold: 19 (21.84%), Average: £347,015.00Q1 2013: Marketed: 81, New: 29, Removed: 16 (19.75%), Sold: 15 (18.52%), Average: £322,801.00Q2 2013: Marketed: 91, New: 44, Removed: 25 (27.47%), Sold: 13 (14.29%), Average: £307,859.00Q3 2013: Marketed: 85, New: 45, Removed: 35 (41.18%), Sold: 22 (25.88%), Average: £336,925.00Q4 2013: Marketed: 81, New: 42, Removed: 27 (33.33%), Sold: 26 (32.10%), Average: £345,482.00Q1 2014: Marketed: 88, New: 51, Removed: 20 (22.73%), Sold: 22 (25.00%), Average: £343,952.00Q2 2014: Marketed: 77, New: 37, Removed: 11 (14.29%), Sold: 31 (40.26%), Average: £335,744.00Q3 2014: Marketed: 82, New: 47, Removed: 15 (18.29%), Sold: 28 (34.15%), Average: £344,040.00Q4 2014: Marketed: 55, New: 12, Removed: 1 (1.82%), Sold: 6 (10.91%), Average: £396,500.00Nov 2014: Marketed: 53.0, New: 10.0, Removed: 6 (11.32%), Sold: ?Dec 2014: Marketed: 41.0, New: 2.0, Removed: ?, Sold: ?Jan 2015: Marketed: 43.0, New: 12.0, Removed: ?, Sold: ?
Market Trends for IG52007: Marketed: 776, New: 661, Removed: 301 (38.79%), Sold: 306 (39.43%), Average: £297,539.002008: Marketed: 713, New: 559, Removed: 374 (52.45%), Sold: 169 (23.70%), Average: £299,671.002009: Marketed: 561, New: 392, Removed: 345 (61.50%), Sold: 130 (23.17%), Average: £252,905.002010: Marketed: 535, New: 446, Removed: 247 (46.17%), Sold: 142 (26.54%), Average: £287,050.002011: Marketed: 611, New: 448, Removed: 290 (47.46%), Sold: 155 (25.37%), Average: £310,120.002012: Marketed: 492, New: 341, Removed: 246 (50.00%), Sold: 141 (28.66%), Average: £311,220.002013: Marketed: 500, New: 390, Removed: 226 (45.20%), Sold: 179 (35.80%), Average: £306,522.002014: Marketed: 426, New: 336, Removed: 163 (38.26%), Sold: 152 (35.68%), Average: £345,355.00Q1 2007: Marketed: 292, New: 177, Removed: 39 (13.36%), Sold: 69 (23.63%), Average: £300,216.00Q2 2007: Marketed: 353, New: 205, Removed: 114 (32.29%), Sold: 75 (21.25%), Average: £284,822.00Q3 2007: Marketed: 315, New: 147, Removed: 78 (24.76%), Sold: 87 (27.62%), Average: £302,158.00Q4 2007: Marketed: 293, New: 132, Removed: 70 (23.89%), Sold: 75 (25.60%), Average: £302,961.00Q1 2008: Marketed: 297, New: 143, Removed: 67 (22.56%), Sold: 42 (14.14%), Average: £295,797.00Q2 2008: Marketed: 375, New: 185, Removed: 83 (22.13%), Sold: 43 (11.47%), Average: £309,459.00Q3 2008: Marketed: 362, New: 145, Removed: 126 (34.81%), Sold: 52 (14.36%), Average: £330,033.00Q4 2008: Marketed: 283, New: 86, Removed: 98 (34.63%), Sold: 32 (11.31%), Average: £263,394.00Q1 2009: Marketed: 285, New: 116, Removed: 97 (34.04%), Sold: 13 (4.56%), Average: £202,134.00Q2 2009: Marketed: 249, New: 92, Removed: 107 (42.97%), Sold: 26 (10.44%), Average: £257,517.00Q3 2009: Marketed: 238, New: 114, Removed: 69 (28.99%), Sold: 49 (20.59%), Average: £274,062.00Q4 2009: Marketed: 164, New: 70, Removed: 72 (43.90%), Sold: 42 (25.61%), Average: £277,908.00Q1 2010: Marketed: 195, New: 106, Removed: 62 (31.79%), Sold: 24 (12.31%), Average: £292,965.00Q2 2010: Marketed: 237, New: 128, Removed: 66 (27.85%), Sold: 31 (13.08%), Average: £265,914.00Q3 2010: Marketed: 283, New: 135, Removed: 47 (16.61%), Sold: 42 (14.84%), Average: £309,972.00Q4 2010: Marketed: 250, New: 77, Removed: 72 (28.80%), Sold: 45 (18.00%), Average: £279,348.00Q1 2011: Marketed: 278, New: 115, Removed: 57 (20.50%), Sold: 31 (11.15%), Average: £363,924.00Q2 2011: Marketed: 265, New: 118, Removed: 83 (31.32%), Sold: 37 (13.96%), Average: £287,092.00Q3 2011: Marketed: 278, New: 130, Removed: 90 (32.37%), Sold: 45 (16.19%), Average: £292,698.00Q4 2011: Marketed: 245, New: 85, Removed: 60 (24.49%), Sold: 42 (17.14%), Average: £296,766.00Q1 2012: Marketed: 234, New: 83, Removed: 43 (18.38%), Sold: 42 (17.95%), Average: £332,886.00Q2 2012: Marketed: 261, New: 115, Removed: 72 (27.59%), Sold: 29 (11.11%), Average: £331,846.00Q3 2012: Marketed: 249, New: 90, Removed: 52 (20.88%), Sold: 29 (11.65%), Average: £307,765.00Q4 2012: Marketed: 204, New: 53, Removed: 79 (38.73%), Sold: 41 (20.10%), Average: £272,384.00Q1 2013: Marketed: 204, New: 94, Removed: 40 (19.61%), Sold: 28 (13.73%), Average: £289,116.00Q2 2013: Marketed: 246, New: 127, Removed: 83 (33.74%), Sold: 38 (15.45%), Average: £317,585.00Q3 2013: Marketed: 199, New: 75, Removed: 64 (32.16%), Sold: 57 (28.64%), Average: £312,193.00Q4 2013: Marketed: 178, New: 94, Removed: 39 (21.91%), Sold: 56 (31.46%), Average: £307,194.00Q1 2014: Marketed: 172, New: 82, Removed: 57 (33.14%), Sold: 34 (19.77%), Average: £337,641.00Q2 2014: Marketed: 182, New: 117, Removed: 35 (19.23%), Sold: 53 (29.12%), Average: £335,450.00Q3 2014: Marketed: 218, New: 112, Removed: 53 (24.31%), Sold: 46 (21.10%), Average: £356,436.00Q4 2014: Marketed: 141, New: 25, Removed: 18 (12.77%), Sold: 19 (13.48%), Average: £364,973.00Nov 2014: Marketed: 123.0, New: 19.0, Removed: 18 (14.63%), Sold: ?Dec 2014: Marketed: 116.0, New: 18.0, Removed: ?, Sold: ?Jan 2015: Marketed: 128.0, New: 25.0, Removed: ?, Sold: ?

Everywhere I look, I am seeing Q2/3 2014 as the top of the market.

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This is a very misleading index of prices on this so-called market. How can people be made aware of this?

As GinAndPlatonic says, all indices are misleading. A large proportion of properties on the market are unsellable at these asking prices, even in 2007.

So how can they possibly be increasing in value? They are not.

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All houses are for sale at a price, that is why some can and will be on the market for years.....make an offer that will always be refused because no offer will ever be good enough...in other words 'not for sale'.... ;)

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So what we have a shortage of, is in fact people who are willing to accept the true market value of their property.

Only because they are asking more than the last similar homes sold for on their street/area.

As soon as the last house/home is sold for less than the previous property, that was sold for less than the property before that.....that will trigger the light bulb moment....the downward momentum will continue to flow downwards.....people judge value by last two or three recent local sales....always wanting to sell for more than what the neighbour got....all things being almost equal. ;)

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I do still hold out hope that the falls will become self reinforcing as the gains have, which is why I'd rather the market corrects naturally rather than through external shock.

But FFS, this isn't a market, it's a god damned fishing competition.

EAs provide the pond of buyers, they and media make the fish hungry, and the sellers cast their lines, only netting the big catches, giving all the other anglers, and perhaps more importantly the other fish, the impression the pond is full of pikes when it's really full of minnows.

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Don't confuse speculators or 'owners' with hard data! Prices in London only go up! They're not making any more of it! Property is a lifestyle choice for experts on HUTH!

Seriously, the more I look at this and think about this, it's truly mindblowing how delusional our society is.

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People I know have reduced the asking price by 8%ish & now taken a further 2%ish drop to get a sale.

The reason they priced it so high originally is that 1) they were told it was worth it & 2) they thought they'd have to pay a lot more for a decent house outside London.

I think SE estate agents indulged in a lot of irrational exuberance when London was flying; houses they're looking at now seem a lot more sensibly (ahem) priced.

The house they love is 35% below their sold (STC) price, last year a comparable house would have had more like a 20% difference.

It's a no-brainer for them.

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Great stuff, could you run it for B24 and CF64 postcodes, please?

Is that your stomping ground?

The Digby, Bagot, Norton(gone), Lad In The Lane, Yenton.

Prices are peek at least.

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The more I think about this, the more angry I am. I knew there were kite flyers in the market, but I never realised that essentially, they #are# the (alleged) market.

Seriously, if you are a first time buyer or market entrant reading this, just say NO. This pyramid scheme that masquerades as a market is nothing more or less than a private tax on the most basic of human needs, to fund luxurious lifestyles for people who wouldn't know a days hard work if it slapped them one their tiny foreheads.

Why should we work all our lives, just so they don't have to?

If nobody provides the ever increasing funds at the bottom that are needed to keep this charade going, then *they* will be the ones footing the bill, as they should be for their stupid gamble on ever increasing inflation of the price if something everybody should be able to afford, rather than you, and your children, and theirs ad infinitum or until revolution or out and out economic collapse causing pain and misery to millions of people.

SAY NO.

Mrtickle, I'll get your numbers on the thread in the morning.

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Your interpretation of the data is slightly wrong.

For E17 Oct '14

properties on the market = 940

Sales = 108

However new to market in Oct '14 = 247

It'd be more accurate to compare the sales In a month to the 'new to market' figure, but even then you should allow for a delay as the sales one month will be the houses that came to market 3-9months previous.

108/247 = 0.437

So it'd be more accurate to claim in Oct '14 43% of houses sold.

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Well the 940 is including the 247. I considered adding a delay, but it would be pure conjecture as I have ni idea how long they took to completion, other than the guideline 3 months or so.

In the end I decided that it would be no less accurate to simply compare month on month, it was deliberate, and I accept your comment, but it does not effect the overall message, that there are far, far more properties for sale than there are sold.

Appreciate your time looking at the numbers to verify though. I will run them through as you suggest and double check there aren't any outliers.

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It's the same on Ebay with 'collectible' stuff. In the area I follow, a lot of things worth more than say 300 quid gets put on as BIN because sellers don't want to risk running an auction to allow actual price discovery to take place. One item was listed BIN for 1800 quid, an identical item that ran as an auction went for 680 quid. Like the houses, it's just greed behind it all.

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Great Crash 1 (from these figures) has so far been

a) down by £20k

B) and then rising a further £140k till today.

who has this money? where is it coming from?

From people who already own a house, or are related someone who does (MEW to BOMAD).

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Great stuff, could you run it for B24 and CF64 postcodes, please?

Market Trends for B242007: Marketed: 1403, New: 1212, Removed: 487 (34.71%), Sold: 576 (41.05%), Average: £146,394.002008: Marketed: 912, New: 591, Removed: 379 (41.56%), Sold: 314 (34.43%), Average: £141,866.002009: Marketed: 576, New: 364, Removed: 214 (37.15%), Sold: 240 (41.67%), Average: £132,016.002010: Marketed: 653, New: 496, Removed: 229 (35.07%), Sold: 207 (31.70%), Average: £131,294.002011: Marketed: 704, New: 499, Removed: 284 (40.34%), Sold: 243 (34.52%), Average: £125,930.002012: Marketed: 748, New: 557, Removed: 296 (39.57%), Sold: 253 (33.82%), Average: £135,081.002013: Marketed: 827, New: 645, Removed: 358 (43.29%), Sold: 290 (35.07%), Average: £132,112.002014: Marketed: 743, New: 553, Removed: 249 (33.51%), Sold: 317 (42.66%), Average: £137,316.00Q1 2007: Marketed: 490, New: 299, Removed: 47 (9.59%), Sold: 149 (30.41%), Average: £141,709.00Q2 2007: Marketed: 598, New: 338, Removed: 101 (16.89%), Sold: 139 (23.24%), Average: £142,469.00Q3 2007: Marketed: 635, New: 286, Removed: 141 (22.20%), Sold: 156 (24.57%), Average: £152,202.00Q4 2007: Marketed: 639, New: 289, Removed: 198 (30.99%), Sold: 132 (20.66%), Average: £149,199.00Q1 2008: Marketed: 523, New: 202, Removed: 64 (12.24%), Sold: 104 (19.89%), Average: £152,692.00Q2 2008: Marketed: 513, New: 187, Removed: 100 (19.49%), Sold: 103 (20.08%), Average: £149,833.00Q3 2008: Marketed: 444, New: 142, Removed: 126 (28.38%), Sold: 56 (12.61%), Average: £137,552.00Q4 2008: Marketed: 322, New: 60, Removed: 89 (27.64%), Sold: 51 (15.84%), Average: £127,386.00Q1 2009: Marketed: 292, New: 80, Removed: 95 (32.53%), Sold: 32 (10.96%), Average: £140,544.00Q2 2009: Marketed: 247, New: 68, Removed: 37 (14.98%), Sold: 56 (22.67%), Average: £112,612.00Q3 2009: Marketed: 250, New: 88, Removed: 11 (4.40%), Sold: 70 (28.00%), Average: £138,410.00Q4 2009: Marketed: 279, New: 128, Removed: 71 (25.45%), Sold: 82 (29.39%), Average: £136,496.00Q1 2010: Marketed: 291, New: 134, Removed: 33 (11.34%), Sold: 27 (9.28%), Average: £127,728.00Q2 2010: Marketed: 330, New: 134, Removed: 61 (18.48%), Sold: 48 (14.55%), Average: £128,727.00Q3 2010: Marketed: 371, New: 138, Removed: 60 (16.17%), Sold: 62 (16.71%), Average: £136,682.00Q4 2010: Marketed: 322, New: 90, Removed: 75 (23.29%), Sold: 70 (21.74%), Average: £132,041.00Q1 2011: Marketed: 317, New: 112, Removed: 61 (19.24%), Sold: 46 (14.51%), Average: £116,025.00Q2 2011: Marketed: 324, New: 124, Removed: 47 (14.51%), Sold: 54 (16.67%), Average: £120,075.00Q3 2011: Marketed: 387, New: 176, Removed: 34 (8.79%), Sold: 69 (17.83%), Average: £136,433.00Q4 2011: Marketed: 331, New: 87, Removed: 142 (42.90%), Sold: 74 (22.36%), Average: £131,187.00Q1 2012: Marketed: 346, New: 155, Removed: 51 (14.74%), Sold: 51 (14.74%), Average: £138,639.00Q2 2012: Marketed: 349, New: 139, Removed: 98 (28.08%), Sold: 66 (18.91%), Average: £138,175.00Q3 2012: Marketed: 360, New: 156, Removed: 41 (11.39%), Sold: 77 (21.39%), Average: £136,614.00Q4 2012: Marketed: 310, New: 107, Removed: 106 (34.19%), Sold: 59 (19.03%), Average: £126,894.00Q1 2013: Marketed: 364, New: 182, Removed: 58 (15.93%), Sold: 47 (12.91%), Average: £138,036.00Q2 2013: Marketed: 383, New: 178, Removed: 131 (34.20%), Sold: 64 (16.71%), Average: £118,955.00Q3 2013: Marketed: 362, New: 148, Removed: 101 (27.90%), Sold: 87 (24.03%), Average: £135,666.00Q4 2013: Marketed: 327, New: 137, Removed: 68 (20.80%), Sold: 92 (28.13%), Average: £135,790.00Q1 2014: Marketed: 386, New: 196, Removed: 80 (20.73%), Sold: 87 (22.54%), Average: £142,381.00Q2 2014: Marketed: 333, New: 163, Removed: 100 (30.03%), Sold: 100 (30.03%), Average: £128,186.00Q3 2014: Marketed: 297, New: 139, Removed: 46 (15.49%), Sold: 99 (33.33%), Average: £142,891.00Q4 2014: Marketed: 203, New: 55, Removed: 23 (11.33%), Sold: 31 (15.27%), Average: £132,790.00Nov 2014: Marketed: 215.0, New: 49.0, Removed: 6 (2.79%), Sold: ?Dec 2014: Marketed: 197.0, New: 29.0, Removed: ?, Sold: ?Jan 2015: Marketed: 208.0, New: 45.0, Removed: ?, Sold: ?
Market Trends for CF642007: Marketed: 1195, New: 968, Removed: 20 (1.67%), Sold: 830 (69.46%), Average: £223,174.002008: Marketed: 1299, New: 956, Removed: 349 (26.87%), Sold: 401 (30.87%), Average: £229,997.002009: Marketed: 1350, New: 812, Removed: 524 (38.81%), Sold: 406 (30.07%), Average: £227,056.002010: Marketed: 1342, New: 915, Removed: 428 (31.89%), Sold: 411 (30.63%), Average: £252,585.002011: Marketed: 1511, New: 981, Removed: 516 (34.15%), Sold: 485 (32.10%), Average: £225,292.002012: Marketed: 1541, New: 1053, Removed: 507 (32.90%), Sold: 542 (35.17%), Average: £234,766.002013: Marketed: 1540, New: 1078, Removed: 585 (37.99%), Sold: 633 (41.10%), Average: £235,596.002014: Marketed: 1321, New: 940, Removed: 260 (19.68%), Sold: 593 (44.89%), Average: £245,034.00Q1 2007: Marketed: 465, New: 238, Removed: 7 (1.51%), Sold: 164 (35.27%), Average: £214,129.00Q2 2007: Marketed: 578, New: 298, Removed: 14 (2.42%), Sold: 228 (39.45%), Average: £215,451.00Q3 2007: Marketed: 627, New: 254, Removed: -41 (-6.54%), Sold: 246 (39.23%), Average: £249,501.00Q4 2007: Marketed: 562, New: 178, Removed: 40 (7.12%), Sold: 192 (34.16%), Average: £213,614.00Q1 2008: Marketed: 580, New: 237, Removed: 30 (5.17%), Sold: 110 (18.97%), Average: £235,782.00Q2 2008: Marketed: 641, New: 242, Removed: 63 (9.83%), Sold: 127 (19.81%), Average: £229,645.00Q3 2008: Marketed: 798, New: 323, Removed: 118 (14.79%), Sold: 81 (10.15%), Average: £233,093.00Q4 2008: Marketed: 726, New: 154, Removed: 138 (19.01%), Sold: 83 (11.43%), Average: £221,469.00Q1 2009: Marketed: 785, New: 247, Removed: 176 (22.42%), Sold: 52 (6.62%), Average: £216,670.00Q2 2009: Marketed: 717, New: 175, Removed: 124 (17.29%), Sold: 69 (9.62%), Average: £245,178.00Q3 2009: Marketed: 696, New: 193, Removed: 131 (18.82%), Sold: 146 (20.98%), Average: £221,909.00Q4 2009: Marketed: 592, New: 197, Removed: 93 (15.71%), Sold: 139 (23.48%), Average: £224,468.00Q1 2010: Marketed: 636, New: 209, Removed: 100 (15.72%), Sold: 71 (11.16%), Average: £280,237.00Q2 2010: Marketed: 714, New: 279, Removed: 137 (19.19%), Sold: 86 (12.04%), Average: £227,307.00Q3 2010: Marketed: 757, New: 257, Removed: 47 (6.21%), Sold: 133 (17.57%), Average: £261,508.00Q4 2010: Marketed: 718, New: 170, Removed: 144 (20.06%), Sold: 121 (16.85%), Average: £241,286.00Q1 2011: Marketed: 768, New: 238, Removed: 68 (8.85%), Sold: 86 (11.20%), Average: £213,255.00Q2 2011: Marketed: 828, New: 289, Removed: 119 (14.37%), Sold: 110 (13.29%), Average: £213,996.00Q3 2011: Marketed: 870, New: 265, Removed: 171 (19.66%), Sold: 142 (16.32%), Average: £233,612.00Q4 2011: Marketed: 773, New: 189, Removed: 158 (20.44%), Sold: 147 (19.02%), Average: £240,306.00Q1 2012: Marketed: 838, New: 350, Removed: 147 (17.54%), Sold: 124 (14.80%), Average: £221,716.00Q2 2012: Marketed: 795, New: 274, Removed: 141 (17.74%), Sold: 134 (16.86%), Average: £231,028.00Q3 2012: Marketed: 796, New: 248, Removed: 127 (15.95%), Sold: 140 (17.59%), Average: £262,442.00Q4 2012: Marketed: 690, New: 181, Removed: 92 (13.33%), Sold: 144 (20.87%), Average: £223,878.00Q1 2013: Marketed: 716, New: 254, Removed: 127 (17.74%), Sold: 122 (17.04%), Average: £228,867.00Q2 2013: Marketed: 771, New: 327, Removed: 148 (19.20%), Sold: 149 (19.33%), Average: £237,963.00Q3 2013: Marketed: 786, New: 308, Removed: 144 (18.32%), Sold: 175 (22.26%), Average: £231,437.00Q4 2013: Marketed: 642, New: 189, Removed: 166 (25.86%), Sold: 187 (29.13%), Average: £244,118.00Q1 2014: Marketed: 646, New: 265, Removed: 61 (9.44%), Sold: 164 (25.39%), Average: £236,477.00Q2 2014: Marketed: 686, New: 324, Removed: 128 (18.66%), Sold: 172 (25.07%), Average: £254,848.00Q3 2014: Marketed: 660, New: 268, Removed: 54 (8.18%), Sold: 222 (33.64%), Average: £249,474.00Q4 2014: Marketed: 475, New: 83, Removed: 17 (3.58%), Sold: 35 (7.37%), Average: £227,939.00Nov 2014: Marketed: 432.0, New: 63.0, Removed: 71 (16.44%), Sold: ?Dec 2014: Marketed: 373.0, New: 50.0, Removed: ?, Sold: ?Jan 2015: Marketed: 482.0, New: 143.0, Removed: ?, Sold: ?

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  • The Prime Minister stated that there were three Brexit options available to the UK:   215 members have voted

    1. 1. Which of the Prime Minister's options would you choose?


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