Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
Sign in to follow this  
fru-gal

Max Keiser Discussion

Recommended Posts

Just when Mitch starts to say something interesting Max cuts him off.

So frustrating....

Maybe tomorrows show will be better (Mitch again)

Mitch seems to have his head screwed on. Quite scary what he is saying though. He seems to think there will be a huge economic crash sooner rather than later too. I totally agree, sometimes Max just needs to know when to stfu.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes...but often when Max says "I`ll have to have you back again` then he does mean just that. They`ll have recorded another show ready for tomorrow.

I don`t know how they do that...it`s some kind of magic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm a bit confused with Max these days..he was a hyper-inflationist and now he is keen to emphasise deflation. He was one who claimed that CPI was under reporting, he's certainly gone quiet on that front.

I guess he is signed up for both, first the deflation, then the hyper-inflation. Meanwhile he certainly hedged inflation a bit early.

The crypto currency and silver not going well. Though I guess he was in there before the boom so still in the money...especially crypto.

Edited by crashmonitor

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm a bit confused with Max these days..he was a hyper-inflationist and now he is keen to emphasise deflation. He was one who claimed that CPI was under reporting, he's certainly gone quiet on that front.

I guess he is signed up for both, first the deflation, then the hyper-inflation. Meanwhile he certainly hedged inflation a bit early.

The crypto currency and silver not going well. Though I guess he was in there before the boom so still in the money...especially crypto.

can't speak for Max, but people I know that he admires eg. Prof Fekete, say deflation first then hyperinflation. Hard currency such as gold and bitcoin won't do too well during the deflation. You must "look across the valley "

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Keiser Schiff Shedlock Hendry ZH Faber etc etc etc were all hyperinflationistas until 2013, AFTER disinflation had been set in for a couple of years. Then they went silent. NOW that 14 of 34 OECD countries are in delfation all of a sudden they are deflationistas.

Just like HPC!

As I have said before beware of media gurus who are selling ratings, clicks, books etc

Of course they are all gold bugs and have never waivered from their bugery. Even though S and G topped in 2011 and only showed potential for reversal from late 2013. A long time when S fell 60% and G 35% and miners 60-80%!

In fact didn't they go negative of PMs in 2013?...

They are right on the big picture of course but they have lost some folk lots and lots of money.

Sell US$, sell Govt bonds, sell property, buy PMs. Which of those has been right? None!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

can't speak for Max, but people I know that he admires eg. Prof Fekete, say deflation first then hyperinflation. Hard currency such as gold and bitcoin won't do too well during the deflation. You must "look across the valley "

Well indeed we had the Planet Ponzi guy talking Weimar and at the same time agreeing with Max that low interest rates were embedding deflation so one assumes that is the course they are seeing.

Meanwhile, even in the Weimar republic hyper-inflation was not an overnight occurrence...so taking losses in the valley doesn't make that much sense to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Japan has been through 20 years of mild deflation. Now they are heading to inflation and likely super and probably even hyperinflation within a few years

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Japan has been through 20 years of mild deflation. Now they are heading to inflation and likely super and probably even hyperinflation within a few years

OK, this is interesting. Let's assume that the above is correct (I have no idea) what then happens to the Japanese economy and then the world?

Presumably the Yen would get stronger and stronger? But to try and keep a lid on inflation the Japanese would be raising interest rates... but then wouldn't rising interest rates then make the Yen even stronger?

Wouldn't that then result in the Japanese exporting inflation or, surely, wouldn't it more likely make them simply uncompetitive allowing the likes of China, Taiwan, Korea, etc, to profit?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

can't speak for Max, but people I know that he admires eg. Prof Fekete, say deflation first then hyperinflation. Hard currency such as gold and bitcoin won't do too well during the deflation. You must "look across the valley "

From a non-Austrian perspective, I think Minsky would have agreed, and I certainly do. Consider the example of the US dollar crises of the 60s-70s but with episodes of default/hyperinflation this time round rather than stagflation. Almost uniquely, Minsky saw the Fed's role during that time in a positive light. Stagflation was the necessary cure for Nixon's free-spending profligacy. Of course, US/UK debt obligations are incomparably vaster today.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Japan has been through 20 years of mild deflation. Now they are heading to inflation and likely super and probably even hyperinflation within a few years

Yes, I remember people on here saying that it would be deflation then hyperinflation as they monetise debt.

It's the only way out for governments. The debt is too much to service.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking at the general situation in the 'West' since 2008, we've had lots of money printing and quite persistent inflation instead of what should have been a massive deflation (after the huge credit bubble burst) - until recently when the printing has been pared back and we are starting to see deflation beckon again.

We haven't seen anything like persistent deflation yet and IMO are unlikely to see it any time soon once the central banks resume the flat out printing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking at the general situation in the 'West' since 2008, we've had lots of money printing and quite persistent inflation instead of what should have been a massive deflation (after the huge credit bubble burst) - until recently when the printing has been pared back and we are starting to see deflation beckon again.

We haven't seen anything like persistent deflation yet and IMO are unlikely to see it any time soon once the central banks resume the flat out printing.

commodities? prices fell off a cliff. oil decimated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I remember people on here saying that it would be deflation then hyperinflation as they monetise debt.

It's the only way out for governments. The debt is too much to service.

Yes me. And some others but very much the minority at the time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

commodities? prices fell off a cliff. oil decimated.

I'm talking about the last seven years ... there should have been a massive collapse in prices once the credit bubble burst in 2008. We saw the beginnings of it but then all out printing (mostly by the Fed) ensured that asset prices held or rose. It's only now that the Fed has pared back the printing that we are seeing deflation looming and it has yet to actually take hold. If the Fed ramps up the printing again then we'll get yet more asset price inflation, and printing by the BoE can certainly prop up sterling-denominated asset *i.e. House) prices.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is not only since October - ending of QE3 in US - that we are seeing deflation. Global int rates had been falling (collapsing) since Jan 2014 and as he said commodities have been falling sicne 2010/11.

Of course the Eurozone has been getting to deflation for years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • The Prime Minister stated that there were three Brexit options available to the UK:   217 members have voted

    1. 1. Which of the Prime Minister's options would you choose?


      • Leave with the negotiated deal
      • Remain
      • Leave with no deal

    Please sign in or register to vote in this poll. View topic


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.