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Peter Oborne Resigns From Telegraph -- Merged Threads

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How to increase your pay-off by investing in property.

Article sponsered by Fergus Wilson.

The online Telegraph is a strange creature these days. Some good business articles, slowly getting filled up with click-bait, filla crap.

Bring back Conrad and his pushy wife.

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Seems to be saying that the news is now decided by corporations paying for advertising.

Makes you wonder what else is going on, VI BTL etc, be careful what you believe.

Mmmmmm

Have you got a link to his words?

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How to increase your pay-off by investing in property.

Article sponsered by Fergus Wilson.

The online Telegraph is a strange creature these days. Some good business articles, slowly getting filled up with click-bait, filla crap.

Bring back Conrad and his pushy wife.

Nah, Fergus is far too fat and tight to be paying for something

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Very interesting and worrying article (but not surprising sadly).

The likes of the DM have been running advertorials for a while now and frankly the best thing to do with anything in the DM is to take a large pinch of salt with it. It's not something you expect to see in the DT.

I agree totally with Oborne on the following:

There is a purpose to journalism, and it is not just to entertain. It is not to pander to political power, big corporations and rich men. Newspapers have what amounts in the end to a constitutional duty to tell their readers the truth.

We've known for a long time that papers hold certain political views and you can adjust for that, corporate interference is another more worrying matter.

The trouble is newspapers are so dependent on advertising revenue, even more so with their "free" newspaper websites which are totally reliant on advertising. That reliance gives the advertisers power and with that power comes the potential to corrupt a newspaper.

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Last week I made another discovery. Three years ago the Telegraph investigations teamthe same lot who carried out the superb MPs’ expenses investigationreceived a tip off about accounts held with HSBC in Jersey. Essentially this investigation was similar to the Panorama investigation into the Swiss banking arm of HSBC. After three months research the Telegraph resolved to publish. Six articles on this subject can now be found online, between 8 and 15 November 2012, although three are not available to view.

Thereafter no fresh reports appeared. Reporters were ordered to destroy all emails, reports and documents related to the HSBC investigation. I have now learnt, in a remarkable departure from normal practice, that at this stage lawyers for the Barclay brothers became closely involved. When I asked the Telegraph why the Barclay brothers were involved, it declined to comment.

This was the pivotal moment. From the start of 2013 onwards stories critical of HSBC were discouraged. HSBC suspended its advertising with the Telegraph. Its account, I have been told by an extremely well informed insider, was extremely valuable. HSBC, as one former Telegraph executive told me, is “the advertiser you literally cannot afford to offend”. HSBC today refused to comment when I asked whether the bank's decision to stop advertising with the Telegraph was connected in any way with the paper's investigation into the Jersey accounts.

Winning back the HSBC advertising account became an urgent priority. It was eventually restored after approximately 12 months. Executives say that Murdoch MacLennan was determined not to allow any criticism of the international bank. “He would express concern about headlines even on minor stories,” says one former Telegraph journalist. “Anything that mentioned money-laundering was just banned, even though the bank was on a final warning from the US authorities. This interference was happening on an industrial scale.

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Last week I made another discovery. Three years ago the Telegraph investigations teamthe same lot who carried out the superb MPs’ expenses investigationreceived a tip off about accounts held with HSBC in Jersey. Essentially this investigation was similar to the Panorama investigation into the Swiss banking arm of HSBC. After three months research the Telegraph resolved to publish. Six articles on this subject can now be found online, between 8 and 15 November 2012, although three are not available to view.

Thereafter no fresh reports appeared. Reporters were ordered to destroy all emails, reports and documents related to the HSBC investigation. I have now learnt, in a remarkable departure from normal practice, that at this stage lawyers for the Barclay brothers became closely involved. When I asked the Telegraph why the Barclay brothers were involved, it declined to comment.

This was the pivotal moment. From the start of 2013 onwards stories critical of HSBC were discouraged. HSBC suspended its advertising with the Telegraph. Its account, I have been told by an extremely well informed insider, was extremely valuable. HSBC, as one former Telegraph executive told me, is “the advertiser you literally cannot afford to offend”. HSBC today refused to comment when I asked whether the bank's decision to stop advertising with the Telegraph was connected in any way with the paper's investigation into the Jersey accounts.

Winning back the HSBC advertising account became an urgent priority. It was eventually restored after approximately 12 months. Executives say that Murdoch MacLennan was determined not to allow any criticism of the international bank. “He would express concern about headlines even on minor stories,” says one former Telegraph journalist. “Anything that mentioned money-laundering was just banned, even though the bank was on a final warning from the US authorities. This interference was happening on an industrial scale.

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Before Telegraph, it appeared to me the Barclay brothers didn't fold into alleged Standard Life pressure, when they had The Scotsman. I recall Andrew Neil on TV some years ago, and it was pressure/serious at the time as to what would happen for him, but seem to recall him being pleased the brothers responded to outside influences with a position on lines of 'the newspaper ran stories decided by its Editorial staff.'

Our mutual friend? More an arrogant self server
By Jeff Randall
12:01AM GMT 18 Jan 2004

[..]In public, Standard was full of self-righteous indignation; behind the scenes it played dirty. It contacted the Barclay family, owners of the Sunday Business and the Scotsman, with veiled threats to withdraw advertising from their newspapers and demands for Neil to be sacked. All that demonstrated was that Standard knew even less about the Barclays' integrity than it did about its members' welfare.

The allegations (HSBC) are fully out there in the wider press... there may be something to it.. no idea... but I'm open to possibility some sourness here too. Diddums; sackings to streamline, and management in charge with some language about those who complain about it. (It's not his job to have such influence/be in on such decisions). Telling chief exec not to take readers (customers) for granted?

I'm pleased some of the old-heads are out. Has it ever been explained fully why thingy was let go... Cowie.... ah it was his 'own decision'.. (so often bragging how well HPI did for him - he got picked up by the Sunday Times though which I wasn't best pleased about)... and seemed to me a few final weeks of throwing some shots at HPCers.

Get them replaced by younger people coming through - although the property articles and younger journos there don't give me any hope - but it's a failing shared with many other newspapers.

http://www.housepricecrash.co.uk/forum/index.php?/topic/190616-goodbye-ian-cowie/

Friday 22 March 2013 13.34 GMT

Sad days as the Telegraph exodus begins

The Telegraph exodus, following the announcement earlier this month of 80 redundancies, has begun.


Naturally enough, reducing the staff by 14% has proved to be a sad exercise. As one senior executive told me: "There is no way this can be anything other than a gloomy business. No-one is triumphalist about letting people go."

Some have volunteered; some have been required to walk the plank. And it is the Sunday Telegraph that has taken by far the greatest hit.

[..]I am also informed of three more voluntary leavers - Angela Monaghan, Ben Harrington and Ian Cowie, all of whom, like Helia Ebrahimi, are graduates of City University London (where I teach).

Edited by Venger

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In the 81 years between 1923 and 2004 the Telegraph had six editors, all of them towering figures: Arthur Watson, Colin Coote, Maurice Green, Bill Deedes, Max Hastings and Charles Moore. Since the Barclay Brothers purchased the paper 11 years ago there have been roughly six more. There were three editors (or Heads of Content) in 2014 alone.

...

I learnt that Harry Wilson, the admirable banking correspondent of the Telegraph, had published an online story about HSBC based on a report from a Hong Kong analyst who had claimed there was a ‘black hole’ in the HSBC accounts. This story was swiftly removed from the Telegraph website, even though there were no legal problems.

...

For the last 12 months matters have got much, much worse. The foreign deskmagnificent under the leadership of David Munk and David Wastellhas been decimated. As all reporters are aware, no newspaper can operate without skilled sub-editors. Half of these have been sacked, and the chief sub, Richard Oliver, has left.

Solecisms, unthinkable until very recently, are now commonplace. Recently readers were introduced to someone called the Duke of Wessex. Prince Edward is the Earl of Wessex. There was a front page story about deer-hunting. It was actually about deer-stalking, a completely different activity. Obviously the management don’t care about nice distinctions like this. But the readers do, and the Telegraph took great care to get these things right until very recently.

Full story:

https://www.opendemocracy.net/ourkingdom/peter-oborne/why-i-have-resigned-from-telegraph

The Telegraph has turned into a slightly larger version of the Daily Mail

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Good on him, and got balls.

Well done.

Wasn't there a story about the Telegraph editor on a bonus if their news articles helped prevent Scottish independence?

If true they should be shut down and the politicians who sanctioned it imprisoned.

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We've known for a long time that papers hold certain political views and you can adjust for that, corporate interference is another more worrying matter.

The trouble is newspapers are so dependent on advertising revenue, even more so with their "free" newspaper websites which are totally reliant on advertising. That reliance gives the advertisers power and with that power comes the potential to corrupt a newspaper.

Cuts both ways though.

The BBC provides a vast online newspaper funded by a compulsory public levy thus undercutting the private sector newspapers. The guardian receives a large annual subsidy in the form of public sector job advertisments that gives it an element of independence from commercial advertisers. It's hard to see either of them being willing to criticise their own vested interests.

The way this is going sooner or later the only media content out there is going to be the state approved narrative, I'm not sure this is a good thing.

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I noticed they closed most of their blogs that didn't toe the establishment narrative over the past few months and stopped the comments sections on almost all articles.

Not sure what their game is, I try not to visit anymore though.

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Wasn't there a story about the Telegraph editor on a bonus if their news articles helped prevent Scottish independence?

That would have been Alan Cochrane, their Scottish editor. Some of the stuff he was coming up with in the run-up to the referendum was just crazy.

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I noticed they closed most of their blogs that didn't toe the establishment narrative over the past few months and stopped the comments sections on almost all articles.

Not sure what their game is, I try not to visit anymore though.

Thankfully we live in a free society and this just isn't happening.

Move along HPCers, nothing to see here.

On the good news front, the daily express tells people house prices are going up £212 per minute.

:ph34r::ph34r::ph34r::ph34r:

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