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Eddie_George

Hotel Industry Fumes As Uk Prepares To Legalize Airbnb In London

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Airbnb users have many options when they visit London, but they and their hosts are probably unaware that these short-term lets are often illegal. However, that’s about to change – much to the ire of the hotel industry.
On Monday, housing minister Brandon Lewis set out plans for short-term lets to be deregulated in London. A 42-year-old London law says that anyone wanting to rent out their home for less than 90 days must get planning permission to do so, or pay a £20,000 ($30,450) penalty per offence. The government now wants that law scrapped.
“We live in the 21st century, and London homeowners should be able to rent out their home for a short period without having to pay for a council permit. These laws… need to be updated for the internet age,” Lewis said in a statement.
However, the government would still restrict short-term letting to 90 days per calendar year or less, so that the properties don’t effectively become hotels. The properties also can’t be business premises, and councils will be able to apply for “small localised exemptions from the new flexibility, where there is a strong case to do so.”
Anything in the mortgage contract small-print to throw a spanner in the works for these would-be hotel managers?

https://gigaom.com/2015/02/10/hotel-industry-fumes-as-uk-prepares-to-legalize-airbnb-in-london/

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Thousands of empty rooms in London available for people to stay in for a short period of time.......why rent a room in a hotel or from a landlord, when you can borrow a room or sofa surf?

Rich people recently purchase property for storage, investment and tax purposes can use it and lend it to friends and family....think of the money saved on hotel bills. ;)

Edited by winkie

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Hotels could go even shorter term to compete. There's a market already in some places for rooms by the hour.

Still have to clean the sheets....most people use the coffee shop with free wifi or a nice warm library free newspapers, some good books, peace and quiet and a comfy chair....take your own flask of coffee. ;)

Edit....there is always the night bus and soon the underground.

Edited by winkie

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Still have to clean the sheets....most people use the coffee shop with free wifi or a nice warm library free newspapers, some good books, peace and quiet and a comfy chair....take your own flask of coffee. ;)

Edit....there is always the night bus and soon the underground.

Sex in the Library!! On the night bus and undeground!!

Really Winkie!! the mind boggles!

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Sex in the Library!! On the night bus and undeground!!

Really Winkie!! the mind boggles!

Not to be recommended.....there are very many good reasons to stay overnight in London, and a few not so good ones. ;)

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However, the government would still restrict short-term letting to 90 days per calendar year or less, so that the properties don’t effectively become hotels. The properties also can’t be business premises

how can letting out your house for up to 89 days p.a. NOT be a business?

Most of these "disruptive" models are basically just a tax scam. Appropriate given its London and the Tory party.

Edited by R K

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Hotels could go even shorter term to compete. There's a market already in some places for rooms by the hour.

Back in the days before the internet was really useful, I booked a hotel for the weekend in Hamburg which offered Stundenzimmer. That was an experience...

Still have to clean the sheets....

Not in that place! :wacko:

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how can letting out your house for up to 89 days p.a. NOT be a business?

Most of these "disruptive" models are basically just a tax scam. Appropriate given its London and the Tory party.

I assume the "rent a room" exemption would cover the income tax angle.

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Some cities are airbnb friendly, some aren't.

It probably depends upon the strength of the local hotelier lobby.

Here's an article from 2014 . . . airbnb got grief from Barcelona and Berlin.

"Airbnb's legal troubles: what are the issues?

As Airbnb finds itself under growing attack from city authorities around the world this week receiving a 30,000 fine in Barcelona we look at the controversy surrounding the holiday rental site"

http://www.theguardian.com/travel/2014/jul/08/airbnb-legal-troubles-what-are-the-issues

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Still have to clean the sheets....most people use the coffee shop with free wifi or a nice warm library free newspapers, some good books, peace and quiet and a comfy chair....take your own flask of coffee. ;)

Edit....there is always the night bus and soon the underground.

Surely you mean scrape the sheets...

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By the way, I have used airbnb for at least five years and I don't really have any complaints as a consumer.

I do think they allow people to visit many places on a budget . . . you are charged per place rather than per person for starters. And then there are the facilities . . . you can usually save a fortune on eating out.

Hotels do operate price cartels . . . how is it possible that chains will charge the same room prices in countries with vastly different costs and overheads.

As long as people declare their income, I see nothing wrong with it.

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I read just the other day of some Central London borough where social housing flats are being let out via airbnb for high rents compared to what the tenant pays the council. The council is said to be clamping down hard. I should imagine it's not the only London borough with the same problem, though how many of them will do much about it is another matter.

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I had to go to Aberdeen for a week on business. Couldn't get a hotel, so went to AirBnB and chose a 'luxurious business suite close to the city and its amenities'.

Council flat in iffy area with terrifying décor (think dolls houses, dolls and their clothes), doilies everywhere and nothing like what was advertised. That with a chain smoking, hard drinking 45 year old divorced lady of dubious proportions and linguistic abilities.

Managed to get a sofa organised for the following night and it put me off it for ages.

Edited by Hairy1305

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I had to go to Aberdeen for a week on business. Couldn't get a hotel, so went to AirBnB and chose a 'luxurious business suite close to the city and its amenities'.

Council flat in iffy area with terrifying décor (think dolls houses, dolls and their clothes), doilies everywhere and nothing like what was advertised. That with a chain smoking, hard drinking 45 year old divorced lady of dubious proportions and linguistic abilities.

Managed to get a sofa organised for the following night and it put me off it for ages.

That's why I've only ever booked a whole flat through Airbnb. Not knowing who you'll be staying with - OK for a strapping young lad who stays sober, iffy for anyone else, I'd have thought (reviews not withstanding, they can be faked).

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I've looked at the Airbnb site for France , as my in-laws have a 1 bed by the sea they wanted to let out in an informal basis. Looks like a large number of "individuals" have flats they rent on the site 365 days a year. Deifinitely not sofa in a persons house as the marketing blurb would like us to believe.

I thought the whole concept of couch-surfing was the reciprical aspect. ie. you stay for free but offer your own abode as well, to help fellow travellers. A great concept. Airbnb seems to be a Landlords charter to rent their abodes tax-free.

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Another way the govt hopes to prop up ever higher house prices in London. It does depend on a regular supply of tourist numbers.

A free market is exactly that.....take for example Spain, so many empty homes and holiday homes available to share with trusted or known occupants.... House swaps, groups of people who make spare space available to like minded people often for free or for without profit.....unintended consequences.

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I like the idea of the "sharing" economy where resources are utilised better......but I was never a fan of normal bnb's so airbnb does not appeal.

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That's why I've only ever booked a whole flat through Airbnb. Not knowing who you'll be staying with - OK for a strapping young lad who stays sober, iffy for anyone else, I'd have thought (reviews not withstanding, they can be faked).

Airbnb has quite a thorough identity checking process so I'd trust the authenticity of their reviews over almost any other site.

Anything which helps unlock latent supply and address under-occupancy is a good thing.

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Anything in the mortgage contract small-print to throw a spanner in the works for these would-be hotel managers?

https://gigaom.com/2015/02/10/hotel-industry-fumes-as-uk-prepares-to-legalize-airbnb-in-london/

Not usually in the mortgage - but in flats, the lease may have a covenant prohibiting short-term lets. It's quite common in more "upmarket" blocks of flats.

I lived in such a block in Sheffield, and a short-term hotel company started letting out flats in the block on behalf of a couple of landlords. Once the landlord got a court summons for the lease forfeiture hearing, the hotel company was gone within 24 hours.

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Not usually in the mortgage - but in flats, the lease may have a covenant prohibiting short-term lets. It's quite common in more "upmarket" blocks of flats.

I lived in such a block in Sheffield, and a short-term hotel company started letting out flats in the block on behalf of a couple of landlords. Once the landlord got a court summons for the lease forfeiture hearing, the hotel company was gone within 24 hours.

I have a flat on the cliff tops at Bournemouth (don't worry it is not about to topple into the sea). It has this kind of covenant on it otherwise I could make in a couple of months what tenants currently pay in 12.

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