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Texas Man Arrested For Paying Tax In $1 Bills

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http://rt.com/usa/229051-arrest-one-dollar-tax/

A man in Texas has been arrested while trying to pay his tax in $1 bills for “disrupting the operation and efficiency” of the local tax office.

Timothy Norris, 27, was trying to pay his $600 property tax at a tax office in Wichita Falls, Texas, last Wednesday when he was told to leave the office by Tax Assessor Collector Tommy Smyth. Smyth accused Norris of creating a disturbance and disrupting the efficiency of the authority as the latter wanted to pay the whole sum with $1 bills.

However, the banknotes were folded very tightly so it “required tax office personnel approximately six minutes to unfold each bill,” Smyth said, the Times Record News reported.

Unfolding the bills paralyzed work in the office, so Smyth asked Norris to leave. However, the latter refused. The Wichita County Sheriff’s Office deputy who was present as the situation unfolded tried to arrest Norris but he pulled away and the deputy had to use force to detain him.

Norris was charged with criminal trespass and additionally charged with resisting arrest. Norris’ bail was announced as standing at $500 for both charges.

There surely has to be more to this story. How can the office object to the paying of bills in legal tender?

And just what had been done to the bills that it took 6 minutes to unfold each one? Can anyone on here fold a note so tightly that it's impossible to open?

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Origami football shirts out of notes.

And there are limits in the UK on certain denominations in shops. However for court fines all currency is valid and you can pay them with 1ps :)

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Origami football shirts out of notes.

And there are limits in the UK on certain denominations in shops. However for court fines all currency is valid and you can pay them with 1ps :)

thats not true for denominations below £1. See...Legal Tender.

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I seem to remember something about it being the case that if a creditor refuses to accept a debtors offer of legal tender, the debt cannot be enforced?

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Unfolding the bills paralyzed work in the office, so Smyth asked Norris to leave.

He just happened to be there at the time and they were looking for an excuse.

With make-work you can put 50% of a department on a new task and it'll still make no difference to the rest.

6 minutes to unfold a note :lol: - they must have been ironing them as well.

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They were probably folded VERY small.

Shades of the late great R. T. Fishall (Sir Patrick Moore).

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2254467/How-drive-jobsworths-potty-IN-devilishly-inventive-manifesto-late-astronomer-Sir-Patrick-Moore-tells-fought-box-ticking-bullies.html

Ten commandments for bureaucrat bashing

1. Never say anything clearly. When writing to jobsworths and timeservers, word your letter so that it could mean almost anything…or nothing.

2. Don’t be legible. Always write letters by hand, and make your verbose scrawl as impenetrable as possible.

3. Garble your opponent’s name. Misread the signature. If the correspondence is signed ‘M. Harris’, address your reply to ‘N. Hayes’ or ‘W. Hardy’. Don’t get too flippant though — the penpushers might lack a sense of humour, but if you write to ‘M. Hedgehog’, they will sense a legpull.

4. Give fake references. If you have a letter from the tax office, ref: EH/4/PNG/H8, mark your reply with some other code in the same format, such as DC/5/IMH/R9. This should ensure that the taxman wastes minutes, or hopefully hours, rooting for a file that doesn’t exist.

5. The same goes for dates. Get them slightly wrong, every time.

6. Follow up your fakes. Write to request a reply to letters that you haven’t sent, and include bogus reference numbers. This is a surefire timewaster and might even, if your Twitmarsh is of a sensitive disposition, reduce him to tears.

7. Never pay the right amount. Include a discrepancy in every envelope — never too much, but always more than a few pence. A sum between £1.20 and £2.80 is recommended. Then you can start an interminable correspondence to reclaim the overpayment (or dispute the underpayment).

8. When enclosing a cheque, staple it to the letter. With two staples. Or three. Right in the middle of the cheque. At the least, you’ll waste someone’s time — at best, you might wreck their computer.

9. As a point of honour, never give up on a correspondence before at least six pointless letters have been exchanged. Think big and aim for double figures.

10. If a postage-paid envelope is not supplied by your Twitmarsh, send off your reply without a stamp. The bureaucrats will have to pay much more at the other end.

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I live my life by these rules!

They are not original to Patrick Moore though. They come from Parkinson's Law, the "Chinese method" of tax avoidance if memory serves me correctly, which involves sowing utter confusion with the authorities. Parkinson also gives a "British method" which is simpler and involves working out how long the authorities take to answer a letter and then sending them letters slightly more frequently than that.

I wish I could show you my file from the last time my affairs were investigated by HMRC. It's a work of art - lovely assimilated over about six months. It includes me sending the right documents from the wrong year, the wrong documents from the right year, and informing them they already have possession of other documents they are asking for (which they can never deny because they have no idea what they have.)

I provoked the investigation when self-assessment was first introduced by writing bland remarks along the lines of "XYZ income not shown" on the form and filling it in in pencil (which resulted in next year's form having "complete in black ink" written on it.)

I noticed during the investigation that I kept getting passed from investigating officer to investigating officer, each one more junior than the last. Once they realise you're messing with them the office dogsbody handles your case.

My addtional rules for corresponding with HMRC are:

  • Don't use white A4, they are geared up for handling that. Coloured notepaper is good and may not photocopy and gives the impression you're harmless little old lady.
  • Fill in forms correctly but add extract information outside the boxes.
  • Don't answer any correspondence in a hurry, leave it three weeks before your next letter.
  • Keep meticulous records, keep everything they send you and copies of everything you send them. (I generally write my letters in Word, print them and hand copy to notepaper before sending.)
  • Every item you send, form or letter, must have some sort of get out which invalidates the whole thing.
  • Send everything recorded delivery. Costs, but all deniability on their side is gone. They cannot afford to the same back to you so you can always deny receiving something.

The results of my little exercise was I was taken off self-assessment and told I didn't need to do it anymore.

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man-arrested-for-paying-property-taxes-i

http://rt.com/usa/229051-arrest-one-dollar-tax/

There surely has to be more to this story. How can the office object to the paying of bills in legal tender?

And just what had been done to the bills that it took 6 minutes to unfold each one? Can anyone on here fold a note so tightly that it's impossible to open?

http://thefreethoughtproject.com/man-arrested-pay-taxes-1-bills/

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Must be annoying. Once upon a time, dull little grey people, could safely spend their whole working lives in a secure job at the local tax office followed by a more than comfortable retirement, at the public's expense.

Now, these days they seem to have to constantly run the gauntlet of becoming and unwitting youtube star.

Across the world the relationship between the public and the state is getting ever more fractious. A denouement must surely be on the cards at some point.

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I live my life by these rules! They are not original to Patrick Moore though. They come from Parkinson's Law, the "Chinese method" of tax avoidance if memory serves me correctly, which involves sowing utter confusion with the authorities. Parkinson also gives a "British method" which is simpler and involves working out how long the authorities take to answer a letter and then sending them letters slightly more frequently than that. I wish I could show you my file from the last time my affairs were investigated by HMRC. It's a work of art - lovely assimilated over about six months. It includes me sending the right documents from the wrong year, the wrong documents from the right year, and informing them they already have possession of other documents they are asking for (which they can never deny because they have no idea what they have.) I provoked the investigation when self-assessment was first introduced by writing bland remarks along the lines of "XYZ income not shown" on the form and filling it in in pencil (which resulted in next year's form having "complete in black ink" written on it.) I noticed during the investigation that I kept getting passed from investigating officer to investigating officer, each one more junior than the last. Once they realise you're messing with them the office dogsbody handles your case. My addtional rules for corresponding with HMRC are:

  • Don't use white A4, they are geared up for handling that. Coloured notepaper is good and may not photocopy and gives the impression you're harmless little old lady.
  • Fill in forms correctly but add extract information outside the boxes.
  • Don't answer any correspondence in a hurry, leave it three weeks before your next letter.
  • Keep meticulous records, keep everything they send you and copies of everything you send them. (I generally write my letters in Word, print them and hand copy to notepaper before sending.)
  • Every item you send, form or letter, must have some sort of get out which invalidates the whole thing.
  • Send everything recorded delivery. Costs, but all deniability on their side is gone. They cannot afford to the same back to you so you can always deny receiving something.
The results of my little exercise was I was taken off self-assessment and told I didn't need to do it anymore.

Christ, that was a massive win.

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