Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

interestrateripoff

Nhs Boss Pocketed £155,000 By Retiring For Just 24 Hours: She Quit, Cashed In Pension, Then Got Her Job Back!

Recommended Posts

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2943471/NHS-boss-pocketed-155-000-retiring-just-24-hours-quit-cashed-pension-got-job-back.html

  • Sue James used loophole to bank bonus as Trust declared massive losses
  • She was rehired day later to continue earning salary of almost £200k a year
  • Once offered £250k to gag surgeon who spoke out about poor patient care
  • Executive now faces being investigated and could be fired under new laws

An NHS chief who tried to gag a whistleblower has claimed an extra £155,000 by ‘retiring’ for just 24 hours.

Sue James, 58, used a loophole to bank the tax-free bonus as her Trust declared millions of pounds in losses.

She was then rehired a day later to continue earning her salary of almost £200,000 a year.

The executive – who once offered £250,000 of public money to silence a surgeon who spoke out about poor patient care – was last night branded ‘morally reprehensible’.

Just staggering that they thought this wouldn't cause outrage. Self interest above the common good. Just what you need in public servants.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is rife in the NHS. Its called double dipping. A friend of ours, a nurse of about 30 years has just done it. Only she retired, went back part time and is now on the sick.

Nice work if you can get it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It might be possible to drum up some form of criminal charge for this sort of behaviour, but then that might expose various tax dodgers to the risk of prosecution too - and we couldn't possibly have that, as many important people rely on statement that "whilst it may not be considered moral, it isn't illegal". I am sure with some creativity plod could have arrested scores of bankers and MPs, as well as public sector officials.

In the case of the public sector there must be an offence of malfeasance in a public office - so why would this not apply? Perhaps it might then be found apply to MPs expenses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It might be possible to drum up some form of criminal charge for this sort of behaviour, but then that might expose various tax dodgers to the risk of prosecution too - and we couldn't possibly have that, as many important people rely on statement that "whilst it may not be considered moral, it isn't illegal". I am sure with some creativity plod could have arrested scores of bankers and MPs, as well as public sector officials.

In the case of the public sector there must be an offence of malfeasance in a public office - so why would this not apply? Perhaps it might then be found apply to MPs expenses.

Indeed, they go to great lengths to show impartiality when suppliers are tendering for contracts.

The self same morality must apply to the staff too.?!>?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It might be possible to drum up some form of criminal charge for this sort of behaviour, but then that might expose various tax dodgers to the risk of prosecution too - and we couldn't possibly have that, as many important people rely on statement that "whilst it may not be considered moral, it isn't illegal". I am sure with some creativity plod could have arrested scores of bankers and MPs, as well as public sector officials.

In the case of the public sector there must be an offence of malfeasance in a public office - so why would this not apply? Perhaps it might then be found apply to MPs expenses.

It is no surprise that may people try and minimise the tax they pay when this activity goes on.

It is about time as much effort was put into exposing and ending this misuse of public money as is put into hounding people for tax.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's good to see a real investment in talent. Someone like her could earn millions in the private sector and it's a shame they have to bend the rules to award even this pittance. This is clear evidence that salaries need to be much higher to match the bankers and film stars who contribute far less to society.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Has anyone listened to her try to string two words together when she addressed the staff ?

She's promoted and paid well above her abilities.

For half what she is paid she should be capable of giving an inspirational speech and motivating the workforce.

The workforce will have trudged out after that speech in twos and threes murmuring 'how it ever came to this?'

And they wonder why morale is low and the service is struggling.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This seems to be a trait of the higher echelons of the public sector. Revolving chairs. Poor value in terms of personnel and competence. Often walking disasters, yet able to abuse and profit from the system. All in it together kind of thing!

Needs to be razed to the ground and start again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This must have been signed off by the Trust board - you aren't just allowed personally to retire early take your pension lump sum and then restart the next day in the same job. Yes - morally questionable - but its the system at fault for allowing it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This seems to be a trait of the higher echelons of the public sector. Revolving chairs. Poor value in terms of personnel and competence. Often walking disasters, yet able to abuse and profit from the system. All in it together kind of thing!

Needs to be razed to the ground and start again.

You do get awful management in private sector too, but of course there are more natural checks and balances against it

Don't forget that remuneration of private sector directors etc is in the spotlight these days

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My experience of bad management in the private sector is micro management, beady eyed interferers who can't shut their mouths. Public sector bad management tends, from my recent experience, to consist of a complete avoidance of decisions, masked by economical management speak and tactical avoidance of questions. That scowl that you see on the faces of infamous public sector troughers derives from their constant fight against the natural human instinct to act when something needs doing. By avoiding action they avoid blame and this is how they climbed the public sector greasy pole. But it took training to achieve the necessary self discipline.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My experience of bad management in the private sector is micro management, beady eyed interferers who can't shut their mouths. Public sector bad management tends, from my recent experience, to consist of a complete avoidance of decisions, masked by economical management speak and tactical avoidance of questions. That scowl that you see on the faces of infamous public sector troughers derives from their constant fight against the natural human instinct to act when something needs doing. By avoiding action they avoid blame and this is how they climbed the public sector greasy pole. But it took training to achieve the necessary self discipline.

A good manager lets people make their own decisions, and then provides help when needed!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A good manager lets people make their own decisions, and then provides help when needed!

Agree, wholeheartedly.

And then there are those managers who think greatness is the achievement of the title 'manager' - and that's all there is to it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Agree, wholeheartedly.

And then there are those managers who think greatness is the achievement of the title 'manager' - and that's all there is to it.

Yes I believe I am worikng for one! He actually does what I should be doing, and I get to surf the Internet all day!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How many of 'her' are there in the NHS? No wonder it costs 100 plus billion to run. She will have all the jargon, know how to tick the right boxes but not actually accomplish anything ....

This is the problem. Why I have no time for throwing yet more money at the NHS. Thing is it's not just the NHS. These people are everywhere.

In the private sector we have a choice. It is not tax-payers' money.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The NHS is a bottomless pit for money. The real problem is a shortage of clinicians. Instead we have public sector parasites like this sucking up money.

Just an anecdotal, but I think representative. Went to GP for minor infection. Spoke to the receptionist explaining I didn't need a doctor, as a nurse practioner could very capably prescribe amoxicillin for a finger infection.

Was told one nurse was on holiday, the other on maternity leave, and out of 5 doctors on the books there was only a locum on duty and could I come back in the morning and wait outside at 8 in the morning in the freezing cold to be first in line for a cancellation. The system is approaching something from the 3rd world, and that is the reason a&e broke down his winter. Ill people unable to access medical treatment.

The point I am trying to make, albeit ponderously, is through this farce, there were 5 receptionists on duty with 9 computer monitors and 4 printers 'on duty'

The NHS needs to be culled.

As for me? No, I didn't clog up a&e. My finger swelled and filled with pus and got significantly worse. I applied a bread poultice (i joke not) to 'bring it out' and lanced it with a sterilised needle. It hurt, but job done.

Shambles

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is rife in the NHS. Its called double dipping. A friend of ours, a nurse of about 30 years has just done it. Only she retired, went back part time and is now on the sick.

Nice work if you can get it.

I don't know that this is the same. She may have just retired taking the pension she was entitled to anyway at that age with X number of years contributions into the pension scheme. I think the issue here is if some is early retired with enhancements or made redundant and then hired back.

My Father was a hospital Pharmacy Manager and retired at 60. He wanted to work part time up to 65 and could have easily worked for Tescos or Boots etc. However the trust needed a part time Pharmacist on a lower grade so he was offered that which he willingly took. In addition they retained 30 years tacit knowledge which helped his replacement.

BTW - there were no enhancements to his retirement (ie extra years or a redundancy component)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wish I could do "troughing" I'd have the pension, car, and whelks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Who had the authority to rehire this person?

Yes, seems incredible that an NHS Trust's HR process would allow it to hire a new chief executive without advertising the position or conducting interviews.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • The Prime Minister stated that there were three Brexit options available to the UK:   203 members have voted

    1. 1. Which of the Prime Minister's options would you choose?


      • Leave with the negotiated deal
      • Remain
      • Leave with no deal

    Please sign in or register to vote in this poll. View topic


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.