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Steppenpig

2050

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I think I am about half way through my adult life, and as far as I am concerned, the modern world began in 1980. Despite development in computers, internet, mobile phones (which all existed of course, but are now houshold items), not much seems to have changed in the last 35 years, but I guess that you just don't notice when you are experiencing it live. The period from 1945 to 1980 was an incredibly fast relative decline in the standing of the UK, but most people didn't really perceive it as such.

Is anything interesting going to happen in the next 35 years? China is probably roughly where the US was around 1920, so will presumably be definitely established as the only superpower by 2050, although the US will still be a major competitor. Will the EU implode? Will London still be sucking the life out of the country? Will there be any regional revival? OK, what I really want to know is, where I should buy a house, with long term stability in mind?

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The rise of the Muslim diaspora

- the Islamification of Europe

- Sharia law introduced in the EU

- the US national language changing from American English to Spanish

- China invading Russia, Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Vietnam, the Koreas, Japan, Taiwan, Malay peninsula, Australia and New Zealand.

I'm just glad I won't live to see it all. :ph34r:

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- the US national language changing from American English to Spanish

- China invading Russia, Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Vietnam, the Koreas, Japan, Taiwan, Malay peninsula, Australia and New Zealand.

Alternatively Australia develops many more mega cities around the coast and surpasses the US as the primary English speaking power in the world.

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Alternatively Australia develops many more mega cities around the coast and surpasses the US as the primary English speaking power in the world.

I like that future - I think I'll emigrate now.

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OK, what I really want to know is, where I should buy a house, with long term stability in mind?

Anywhere within the red line - not much changes around here ...

Map-of-Yorkshire-Google-Maps.png

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I wouldn't say modern life started in the 1980, I'd shove it back to post war (once most of the immediate effects of that were out of the way), when various household appliances like fridges and vacuum cleaners, and indoor toilets, were the norm. I can't see that changing either. Most developments since then haven't been massively significant even if they've become near universal (I don't think that that's as contradictory as it sounds).

What has changed significantly is society, and not always for the better.

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I barely recognise the country from that of pre-1997. Something has changed. Not all things are bad of course.

Neurotic, fearful, lacking real leaders and lacking the essence of what we had as a nation.

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Despite development in computers, internet, mobile phones (which all existed of course, but are now houshold items), not much seems to have changed in the last 35 years, but I guess that you just don't notice when you are experiencing it live.

According to the late Terence McKenna and proponents of The Singularity, technological progress is increasing at a self-reinforcing, exponentially accelerating rate and something gob-smacking that will effectively end history is just around the corner.

Personally, I suspect that's b0ll0cks and that a late Victorian lived through a period of more profound technological change than we are doing today.

The future? Very possibly the continued easing back in of 13th century style feudalism, all watched over by the machines of loving grace.

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I barely recognise the country from that of pre-1997. Something has changed. Not all things are bad of course.

Neurotic, fearful, lacking real leaders and lacking the essence of what we had as a nation.

Likewise, as discussed in OT previously, I suspect most folk don't even suspect how profound the impact of the Blair administration was. The scale of social engineering it pulled off is possibly one of those happenings that needs a few years to pass before people can look back and properly take it all in.

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As much tyranny as we'll tolerate, and privacy being the preserve of the wealthy.

RFID chips (or their equivalent) implanted at birth by 2050

I genuinely believe that for most people alive today, they've already had their best years, and I predict an end to mankind by 2100.

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Personally, I suspect that's b0ll0cks and that a late Victorian lived through a period of more profound technological change than we are doing today.

Very definitely agree. We've got a lot of ongoing technological development these days and whilst it may be very visible and worm its way into all aspects of life it's nowhere near as profound. It would be a lot easier to do away with them than it would be with older changes. I suppose that that's inevitable as the big issues are the first to get targetted, and possibly the easiest ones to do. People very often make the mistake of treating every development since as comparable.

Likewise, as discussed in OT previously, I suspect most folk don't even suspect how profound the impact of the Blair administration was. The scale of social engineering it pulled off is possibly one of those happenings that needs a few years to pass before people can look back and properly take it all in.

Could very well be right there. Society now is barely recognisable as the same thing as it was, in a few cases for the better, in most for the worse. It's not entirely down to Blair (things rarely happen suddenly with a neat, easy, obvious cause) but he certainly did his best to shove it on in that direction.

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Could very well be right there. Society now is barely recognisable as the same thing as it was, in a few cases for the better, in most for the worse. It's not entirely down to Blair (things rarely happen suddenly with a neat, easy, obvious cause) but he certainly did his best to shove it on in that direction.

Remember all that talk of the 'Third Way?'

I think we got it.

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Small villages and communities that rule within themselves completely independent merge to towns to cities to countries to continents to the entire globe.....no longer self ruling governments, all but name only but all ruled by a few huge powerful corporates who have complete overall control.....life expectancy will all depend on an individuals productivity and worth, to be decided and judged....designer children that will fight against other man made designer humans, animals and food....poor will not be poor in money as we know it but poor in health, connections and resources....just a quick guess.

Survivors that see, will be those that can find a place to live where they can opt out society, a new society being sold into a world of utopia that turns out to be nothing of the sort. ;)

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Internet forums will consist entirely of AI robots posting counterarguments to each other reflecting which government agency they are operated by.

Meanwhile, humans will be outside in the sun frolicking on lawns and playing with puppies.

Edit: There will only be about 10,000 humans left, though.

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Internet forums will consist entirely of AI robots posting counterarguments to each other reflecting which government agency they are operated by.

Meanwhile, humans will be outside in the sun frolicking on lawns and playing with puppies.

Edit: There will only be about 10,000 humans left, though.

The unlucky ones. ;)

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Guest eight

Anywhere within the red line - not much changes around here ...

Map-of-Yorkshire-Google-Maps.png

I cross that red line four times every schoolday. If you're quick you can actually see it.

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I cross that red line four times every schoolday. If you're quick you can actually see it.

Darlington is ok, but the section with Lancashire is reinforced ...

Keepout.png

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Anywhere within the red line - not much changes around here ...

Heh. You've got much - perhaps most - of England's best scenery there. Shame about the people. :P

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I wouldn't say modern life started in the 1980, I'd shove it back to post war (once most of the immediate effects of that were out of the way), when various household appliances like fridges and vacuum cleaners, and indoor toilets, were the norm.

Well, that's been a progression: IIRC fridges only made it into 50% of UK houses about the end of the '60s, and now we've progressed to most of us having freezers too (and if you don't have a freezer it's the space for it rather than the cost of it that's a problem).

The progression continues today, as we get new things from home insulation to labour-saving dishwashers and robotic house cleaners. Not to mention the progression during that time from early wireless through FM radio, TV, colour TV, 'puters, networking, through to modern pocket-sized always-connected multifunction devices.

There are plenty of other things you can trace back to about 1980-ish. Like the ability to eat a passable meal out for a day's pay or less (as opposed to a week's pay or more), which came in quite rapidly with the Asian cuisines in town and country pubs elsewhere. On the downside is the coming of a culture that marginalises you if you don't have a car.

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Nothing happens suddenly but it's the post-war years IMO where they become common enough to claim a meaningful shift. Things like fridges and freezers are the real changers, computers and TVs aren't anywhere near as significant as people make them out to be. They're luxuries, not fundamental quality of life changers.

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