Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
Sign in to follow this  
interestrateripoff

The 80 People Who's Wealth Equals 3.6Bn Of The Worlds Poorest

Recommended Posts

http://libertyblitzkrieg.com/2015/01/27/meet-the-extreme-super-rich-a-list-of-the-80-people-who-own-half-the-world/

1 Bill Gates $76 USA Tech 2 Carlos Slim Helu $72 Mexico Telecom 3 Amancio Ortega $64 Spain Retail 4 Warren Buffett $58 USA Finance 5 Larry Ellison $48 USA Tech 6 Charles Koch $40 USA Diversified 7 David Koch $40 USA Diversified 8 Sheldon Adelson $38 USA Entertainment 9 Christy Walton $37 USA Retail 10 Jim Walton $35 USA Retail 11 Liliane Bettencourt $35 France Product 12 Stefan Persson $34 Sweden Retail 13 Alice Walton $34 USA Retail 14 S. Robson Walton $34 USA Retail 15 Bernard Arnault $34 France Luxury 16 Michael Bloomberg $33 USA Finance 17 Larry Page $32 USA Tech 18 Jeff Bezos $32 USA Retail 19 Sergey Brin $32 USA Tech 20 Li Ka-shing $31 Hong Kong Diversified 21 Mark Zuckerberg $29 USA Tech 22 Michele Ferrero $27 Italy Food 23 Aliko Dangote $25 Nigeria Commodities 24 Karl Albrecht $25 Germany Retail 25 Carl Icahn $25 USA Finance 26 George Soros $23 USA Finance 27 David Thomson $23 Canada Media 28 Lui Che Woo $22 Hong Kong Entertainment 29 Dieter Schwarz $21 Germany Retail 30 Alwaleed Bin Talal Alsaud $20 Saudi Arabia Finance 31 Forrest Mars Jr. $20 USA Food 32 Jacqueline Mars $20 USA Food 33 John Mars $20 USA Food 34 Jorge Paulo Lemann $20 Brazil Drinks 35 Lee Shau Kee $20 Hong Kong Diversified 36 Steve Ballmer $19 USA Tech 37 Theo Albrecht Jr. $19 Germany Retail 38 Leonardo Del Vecchio $19 Italy Luxury 39 Len Blavatnik $19 USA Diversified 40 Alisher Usmanov $19 Russia Extractives 41 Mukesh Ambani $19 India Extractives 42 Masayoshi Son $18 Japan Telecom 43 Michael Otto $18 Germany Retail 44 Phil Knight $18 USA Retail 45 Tadashi Yanai $18 Japan Retail 46 Gina Rinehart $18 Australia Extractives 47 Mikhail Fridman $18 Russia Extractives 48 Michael Dell $18 USA Tech 49 Susanne Klatten $17 Germany Cars 50 Abigail Johnson $17 USA Finance 51 Viktor Vekselberg $17 Russia Metals 52 Lakshmi Mittal $17 India Metals 53 Vladimir Lisin $17 Russia Transport 54 Cheng Yu-tung $16 Hong Kong Diversified 55 Joseph Safra $16 Brazil Finance 56 Paul Allen $16 USA Tech 57 Leonid Mikhelson $16 Russia Extractives 58 Anne Cox Chambers $16 USA Media 59 Francois Pinault $16 France Retail 60 Iris Fontbona $16 Chile Extractives 61 Azim Premji $15 India Tech 62 Mohammed Al Amoudi $15 Saudi Arabia Extractives 63 Gennady Timchenko $15 Russia Extractives 64 Wang Jianlin $15 China Real Estate 65 Charles Ergen $15 USA Telecom 66 Stefan Quandt $15 Germany Cars 67 Germán Larrea Mota Velasco $15 Mexico Extractives 68 Harold Hamm $15 USA Extractives 69 Ray Dalio $14 USA Finance 70 Donald Bren $14 USA Real Estate 71 Georg Schaeffler $14 Germany Product 72 Luis Carlos Sarmiento $14 Colombia Finance 73 Ronald Perelman $14 USA Finance 74 Laurene Powell Jobs $14 USA Entertainment 75 Serge Dassault $14 France Aviation 76 John Fredriksen $14 Cyprus Transport 77 Vagit Alekperov $14 Russia Extractives 78 John Paulson $14 USA Finance 79 Rupert Murdoch $14 USA Media 80 Ma Huateng $13 China Tech

Just staggering and this helps to create wealth....

Edited by interestrateripoff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The irony is that none of them appear to be hoarders, they have all made money by making things other people wanted and exchanging them willingly for cash.

It's hard to get mad at people like that..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Look, no Brits! Neither native aristocrats like Windsor or Grosvenor nor the immigrant super-rich like Mittal or Hinduja. I wonder if the exclusion of Royalty from these lists is some kind of convention?

We still penalise effort too much. You can be rich here, but you get rich elsewhere, either in an earlier era or another country. I guess that puts the brake on getting even richer for the already-super-rich who top our rich list.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well we are talking wealth not income, most of us have probably got more wealth than the bottom two billion on the basis that their net assets are probably negative.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The irony is that none of them appear to be hoarders, they have all made money by making things other people wanted and exchanging them willingly for cash.

It's hard to get mad at people like that..

Huh? Carlos Slim got his billions by taking control of the phone monopoly in Mexico. Mexico has a huge problem with developing small and mid sized businesses because it takes months to get a working phone line in the country, making it almost impossible to start a business. Meanwhile, the wages of US employees are driven down by the flood of illegal migrants trying to escape the disaster of the Mexican economy (and who would blame them). Slim is nothing but a total parasite wreaking havoc on millions of people.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Huh? Carlos Slim got his billions by taking control of the phone monopoly in Mexico. Mexico has a huge problem with developing small and mid sized businesses because it takes months to get a working phone line in the country, making it almost impossible to start a business. Meanwhile, the wages of US employees are driven down by the flood of illegal migrants trying to escape the disaster of the Mexican economy (and who would blame them). Slim is nothing but a total parasite wreaking havoc on millions of people.

I'm not sure quite where to start with that, but it doesn't correlate with my experience.

There is competition in Mexico, the reason Telmex has been able to retain the lion's share of the market is more to do with the Mexican constitution which has limited foreign investment in the sector.

Telmex/Telcel has invested though, both in Mexico and abroad (Columbia, Peru, Chile, Argentina, Brazil, Uruguay, Ecuador and the USA).

This gives a bit of an insight into the Mexican market though:

Due to Mexican diverse orography—the country is crossed by two high altitude mountain ranges extending from the Rocky Mountains—providing landline telephone service at remote mountainous areas is expensive, and penetration of line-phones per capita is low compared to other Latin American countries, with 20 million lines.[7]

Mobile telephony has the advantage of reaching all areas at a lower cost, due to reduced investments in required infrastructure, and the total number of mobile lines in Mexico is nearly five times that of landlines, with an estimated 95 million lines.[7] The telecommunications industry is regulated by the government through the Federal Telecommunications Institute (IFT, Instituto Federal de Telecomunicaciones).

In April 2009, the ITESM (Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey) reported 25,217,500 users; 78% of personal computer Internet access is broadband access.,[8][9]ranking ninth in the world.

I can relate particularly to that final line.. I remember in Mexico in 1998 being amazed that so many people had high speed broadband (cable), while in the UK everyone I knew was still using dial-up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • The Prime Minister stated that there were three Brexit options available to the UK:   209 members have voted

    1. 1. Which of the Prime Minister's options would you choose?


      • Leave with the negotiated deal
      • Remain
      • Leave with no deal

    Please sign in or register to vote in this poll. View topic


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.