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SarahBell

Why You Should Keep Lottery Wins Secret

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blame the courts for leniency for this.

19 year old thugs "with a string of convictions for robbery", are out and about for some reason.

23 year olds soon to be out again and robbing again.

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I spoke with a journalist who did some item on lotto winners and was told that Camelot try to get jackpot winners to go public on the basis, allegedly, that the Press would find out somehow eventually.

Hmm... I thought boll*x to that. Surely if you tell no one then how can the Press find out?

If I won I wouldn't tell anyone.

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SarahBell - how many lotto 'wins', re your thread title, do you think we all are going to have? :lol:

Well I've won £21M twice now.

Whoops, you got me.

You (all) should keep your lottery wins secret. Plural you, singular win.

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I spoke with a journalist who did some item on lotto winners and was told that Camelot try to get jackpot winners to go public on the basis, allegedly, that the Press would find out somehow eventually.

Hmm... I thought boll*x to that. Surely if you tell no one then how can the Press find out?

If I won I wouldn't tell anyone.

How would you explain a significant change in your lifestyle and spending habits to your family and friends? Tell just one person and the truth is "out there" and you are no longer in control of the situation.

So tell no one, ever and spend the rest of your life stressing that the truth will out, or get it over and done with?

Surely it's better to release the news on your terms?

Going public also means you can take advantage assistance from Camelot - this includes meet ups with other lottery winners. I'm sure advice from these people re handling the win would be worth its weight in gold (seriously)

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What advice do you need handling the win? If it's enough I'd get a nice place to live and chuck the job in, if it wasn't I'd get a nice place to live and carry on with the job. I can't see I'd care much either way whether people knew or not but I've no desire to parade it around in the press.

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I spoke with a journalist who did some item on lotto winners and was told that Camelot try to get jackpot winners to go public on the basis, allegedly, that the Press would find out somehow eventually.

Hmm... I thought boll*x to that. Surely if you tell no one then how can the Press find out?

If I won I wouldn't tell anyone.

are you allowed to do that? Often in raffles/competitions etc there is a clause saying they have the right to publish your name and address. Is this true in the lottery?

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I'm keeping my ten quid secret!

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I don't think a lottery win would make a huge difference to my lifestyle. I'm sort of (by HPC standards - "extremely" by normal standards) frugal - but that's more because I hate waste than because of poverty.

Even if I had a couple of mill in the bank, I'd not buy a new car or book a holiday. Maybe a new bike - but I'm going to get one anyway. I'd quit work tomorrow rather than next year or so, I suppose. But I'll need a cover story for next year without the lottery win.

If I had one of those mega £100million Euro lottery wins, I'd have a problem though. That sort of wonga requires serious management and to not manage it would be as wasteful as squandering it. I'd try and give it away anonymously - but that'd be tricky as I'd want hands on control of how it was charitably spent.

However, these issues are unlikely to trouble me - as I don't do the lottery!

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How would you explain a significant change in your lifestyle and spending habits to your family and friends? Tell just one person and the truth is "out there" and you are no longer in control of the situation.

So tell no one, ever and spend the rest of your life stressing that the truth will out, or get it over and done with?

Surely it's better to release the news on your terms?

Going public also means you can take advantage assistance from Camelot - this includes meet ups with other lottery winners. I'm sure advice from these people re handling the win would be worth its weight in gold (seriously)

How many millions did you win?

Got any spare?

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I had a former work colleague many years back in a past job who, so it seemed, was apparently the only person in the department who played the lottery - and was constantly being teased as to the ridiculous odds ("you've got more chance of being hit by a bus" type stats) being thrown at him and the irrationality of playing the game, etc. Though I was not one of those lecturing him.

One day we came in and saw, on a 'communal' notice board a photocopy enlargement, twice A3 size, of the cheque from Camelot made out to him for, so I recall, roughly £1500 - with the words, scrawled in thick black marker ink, "READ IT AND WEEP!" written over it.

The office was strangely subdued and quiet for much of that day, whilst he walked around with an ear to ear grin on his face.

So, sometimes, Yes - going public has its merits.

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If I had a big win, I'd start my own business*. I would want to continue to work, but on my terms. Hopefully, without the cost of a loan the business would be profitable in a short time; and you'd build it up so look successful. I'd even start up two companies, one to loan the money to the other so companies house shows the business in debt.

I know the above is not the most economical, but it would keep you busy and appear successful.

However, that's if it was a very big win. Anything less than £5m, I'd not change much other than quitting my job and doing something more enjoyable. Ok, new cars and bigger house... but I'd claim to be a debt slave like everyone else!

*The big problem.. is what business :rolleyes:

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One day we came in and saw, on a 'communal' notice board a photocopy enlargement, twice A3 size, of the cheque from Camelot made out to him for, so I recall, roughly £1500 - with the words, scrawled in thick black marker ink, "READ IT AND WEEP!" written over it.

How much had he spent on it by then?

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are you allowed to do that? Often in raffles/competitions etc there is a clause saying they have the right to publish your name and address. Is this true in the lottery?

In the case of the National Lottery I'm pretty sure there is a right to anonymity if you want it - although you can be certain Camelot will do their best to make sure you don't use it.

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I spoke with a journalist who did some item on lotto winners and was told that Camelot try to get jackpot winners to go public on the basis, allegedly, that the Press would find out somehow eventually such stories are great advertising for the Lotto and encourage folk to buy more tickets.

Fixed.

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