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Mrs Bear

Charity Shops And Gift Aid

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Mr B and I have had a big clear out over the past year or so, partly because of having to clear the loft while he put in more insulation. We have taken a mass of stuff to charity shops, and I have just been startled to get a 'tag your bag' update from Oxfam, to say that in one year our stuff has sold for £235.82, on which they can also claim £58.96 of gift aid.

We didn't take even half of it to Oxfam - a lot went to the local hospice shop and the Sally Army among others. Our old crap must be rather less crappy than we thought, though I know it is amazing what people will buy.

I know someone on here is bound to be very rude about Oxfam so will just add that my daughter works for them and has for some years, inc. Aceh post tsunami, Ethiopia in times of drought and cholera, and Haiti post earthquake. She has also worked for other orgs inc. the American Red Cross, and while she will be the first to admit that none of them are 100% perfect, she maintains that Oxfam is a lot more careful than most in not wasting other people's hard earned money.

(But do feel free to be rude regardless, as I know you probably will)

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Big bottoms!

There, that's my rude stuff over with.

I take all of my old stuff to charity shops unless it really is bin fodder and have a wander in if I'm mooching around a town on a Saturday; my work shirts tend to come from them as I occasionally find very decent shirts for a fiver which will last two years; presumably donated by a retiree as will mine be eventually.

I like the re-use (as opposed to recycle) ethic that they represent and don't overly concern myself with the particular charity's actions.

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If there's £100 gift aid or more then have to offer it to you.

The charity shop I've volunteered at used to throw 90% of stuff out because they would rather sell stuff for lots more money than have a rapid turnover of cheap stuff.
Books used to be 10p each and then put them up to 50p. Sales dropped which meant more books thrown away.

Nothing should be sent to the tip, but it is.
There are other "less posh" ways of making money from tat than putting it in a charity shop.
Jumble sales, weighing in rags, even sending furniture to EMMAUS would be better than it being broken up and (paid) sent to the tip.

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There is an argument for donating but not agreeing to the gift aid.

Every time a charity gets handed a tax refund from the govt, there is less money in the govt coffers and so they have to either spend less (unlikely) or raise taxation somewhere else.

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If there's £100 gift aid or more then have to offer it to you.

The charity shop I've volunteered at used to throw 90% of stuff out because they would rather sell stuff for lots more money than have a rapid turnover of cheap stuff.

Books used to be 10p each and then put them up to 50p. Sales dropped which meant more books thrown away.

Nothing should be sent to the tip, but it is.

There are other "less posh" ways of making money from tat than putting it in a charity shop.

Jumble sales, weighing in rags, even sending furniture to EMMAUS would be better than it being broken up and (paid) sent to the tip.

I had never thought of charity shops as 'posh'. And is there not often a lot of stuff left over from jumble sales, too?

We don't have an Emmaus near here. I have been to a huge one in France which was fantastic. Have also been to the Oxford one with daughter who was looking for a dining table. Virtually all the stuff was dire and hideous, or really cheap and flimsy, or both. OTOH our local hospice shop has a large furniture dept. where there are often really nice things at amazing prices - only you do have to be quick. I have seen lovely sofas for a fraction of the price you'd have to pay new.

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I like charity shops. People have given "stuff" away they don't need. And it will sell.

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My son worked at the local hospice warehouse (FOC for experience and CV) and he said their pricing was all over the place. There were s/h computer parts that were more than new on Amazon/Ebay and yet DVDs or PC/PS games were priced so low as to be nonsense and 'designer' label clothes at daft prices. He managed to train up some of the staff to check ebay/amazon listings before pricing stuff up.

Can we have a moan about chuggers or is that OT? These people are a menace on the High St and should be banned.

I find it odd that a young well dressed man or woman would suddenly come up to me, with a big smile and ask me how are you today!

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I had never thought of charity shops as 'posh'. And is there not often a lot of stuff left over from jumble sales, too?

I have seen lovely sofas for a fraction of the price you'd have to pay new.

Everyone needs a sofa for new year?

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Can we have a moan about chuggers or is that OT? These people are a menace on the High St and should be banned.

Feel free. I hate chuggers - they are a positive pest in Kingston. We already have direct debits to various charities - these people always seem to think they're the only one. I wouldn't mind if they were asking for a one off, but it's always a dd.

I signed up for a blind charity ages ago, caught in Oxford St, and declined to give my age or phone number since IMO my age was irrelevant to anyone asking me for money, and I didn't want anyone phoning me.

Later had a letter from the charity saying they were 'unable' to process my 'application' without this info! Letter went in the bin - needless to say the money started coming out of my a/c anyway. Bloody cheek.

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Can we have a moan about chuggers or is that OT? These people are a menace on the High St and should be banned.

Feel free. I hate chuggers - they are a positive pest in Kingston. We already have direct debits to various charities - these people always seem to think they're the only one. I wouldn't mind if they were asking for a one off, but it's always a dd.

I signed up for a blind charity ages ago, caught in Oxford St, and declined to give my age or phone number since IMO my age was irrelevant to anyone asking me for money, and I didn't want anyone phoning me.

Later had a letter from the charity saying they were 'unable' to process my 'application' without this info! Letter went in the bin - needless to say the money started coming out of my a/c anyway. Bloody cheek.

MrPin says they are cheesy f$ckers! :blink:

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Mr Sutton, that was rather amusing, and fits into the PinWorld! :o

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I tend to give to big Issue sellers and beggars on the street. At least I know who's getting it, OK it will go on drugs and drink, but is that any worse than the charity worker putting his kids through private school on the proceeds in his executive position.

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I tend to give to big Issue sellers and beggars on the street. At least I know who's getting it, OK it will go on drugs and drink, but is that any worse than the charity worker putting his kids through private school on the proceeds in his executive position.

Wouldn't bet on that either, organised gangs have ringfenced much of that too.

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If the big issue seller looks eastern European - don't give them a penny.

This is not racist in the slightest - see above ^

For the majority its a scam. They get dropped off in a minibus in Edinburgh ffs !!

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My main problem with charity shops is that most of the big chains have turned themselves into 'boutiques' with loads of new 'gift' items, and only a few overpriced second hand items. That's why I favour the smaller, local charities that still have the 'pile it high and sell it cheap' approach.

Anecdotally I've heard of one charity shop which had too many books, so instead of putting them on sale for 10p (or some other kind of offer) they refused to drop the price and binned them because they didn't want customers to be able to pay 'less than they were worth'.

Hmm, now what other commodity does that remind me of? :rolleyes:

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My main problem with charity shops is that most of the big chains have turned themselves into 'boutiques' with loads of new 'gift' items, and only a few overpriced second hand items. That's why I favour the smaller, local charities that still have the 'pile it high and sell it cheap' approach.

Anecdotally I've heard of one charity shop which had too many books, so instead of putting them on sale for 10p (or some other kind of offer) they refused to drop the price and binned them because they didn't want customers to be able to pay 'less than they were worth'.

Hmm, now what other commodity does that remind me of? :rolleyes:

+1

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My main problem with charity shops is that most of the big chains have turned themselves into 'boutiques' with loads of new 'gift' items, and only a few overpriced second hand items. That's why I favour the smaller, local charities that still have the 'pile it high and sell it cheap' approach.

Anecdotally I've heard of one charity shop which had too many books, so instead of putting them on sale for 10p (or some other kind of offer) they refused to drop the price and binned them because they didn't want customers to be able to pay 'less than they were worth'.

Hmm, now what other commodity does that remind me of? :rolleyes:

The best charity shops are the ones that support local causes, where the results can be seen and the local people benefit from, none of the staff are paid all voluntary. No big CEOs on mega money syphoning the proceeds for themselves, they don't do gift aid and they sell books for 30p each....the only books that get chucked are heavy encyclopaedias, dated reference books or books that people would not take away if you gave them away. ;)

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The best charity shops are the ones that support local causes, where the results can be seen and the local people benefit from, none of the staff are paid all voluntary. No big CEOs on mega money syphoning the proceeds for themselves, they don't do gift aid and they sell books for 30p each....the only books that get chucked are heavy encyclopaedias, dated reference books or books that people would not take away if you gave them away. ;)

So true. I think those that actually give up their time for free to run these shops deserve a medal.

By contrast something is very wrong when the Charity sector is seen as a career option by university leavers because it offers security and large salaries. Obviously something local isn't going to have a career option.

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My main problem with charity shops is that most of the big chains have turned themselves into 'boutiques' with loads of new 'gift' items, and only a few overpriced second hand items. That's why I favour the smaller, local charities that still have the 'pile it high and sell it cheap' approach.

Anecdotally I've heard of one charity shop which had too many books, so instead of putting them on sale for 10p (or some other kind of offer) they refused to drop the price and binned them because they didn't want customers to be able to pay 'less than they were worth'.

Hmm, now what other commodity does that remind me of? :rolleyes:

It's a mindset you'll never get rid of with some people. When I worked at the library I had periodic standoffs with a colleague over the price of books for sale after we had 'weeded' the shelves. She would insist that hardback novels should sell for a lot more than paperbacks, because they were a lot more expensive to buy. Never mind that they would sit there gathering dust, because most people prefer paperbacks and would not want to pay much anyway. She was stubborn as forty-seven mules over this - would rather bin them than sell for 20 or 50p. Me, I would sell them even for 5p rather than bin them.

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It's a mindset you'll never get rid of with some people. When I worked at the library I had periodic standoffs with a colleague over the price of books for sale after we had 'weeded' the shelves. She would insist that hardback novels should sell for a lot more than paperbacks, because they were a lot more expensive to buy. Never mind that they would sit there gathering dust, because most people prefer paperbacks and would not want to pay much anyway. She was stubborn as forty-seven mules over this - would rather bin them than sell for 20 or 50p. Me, I would sell them even for 5p rather than bin them.

Don't get this buying books thing. Basically they are free from the library, so even at 5p why pay for what is free. My partner always looks through the library book sales because she thinks she is getting a bargain. Just adds to the clutter in the house, they will only get read once anyway.

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Don't get this buying books thing. Basically they are free from the library, so even at 5p why pay for what is free. My partner always looks through the library book sales because she thinks she is getting a bargain. Just adds to the clutter in the house, they will only get read once anyway.

The novels get bought, read and returned, and as already mentioned the paperbacks are more popular than heavy space wasting hardbacks...nobody wants the majority of them, many of which are of specialised interest, who has the place to store them,dust them let alone read them once in their entirety never mind more than once....might chuck a nice one on the coffee table to flick through for effect..... ;)

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Don't get this buying books thing. Basically they are free from the library, so even at 5p why pay for what is free. My partner always looks through the library book sales because she thinks she is getting a bargain. Just adds to the clutter in the house, they will only get read once anyway.

I buy books from charity shops - not a lot since we are overflowing with books anyway - but once read they go back to a charity shop for recycling. I have often found books I wouldn't find in the library, where they have cut the stock and in any case novels more than a few yrs old, except for a few classics, are few and far between.

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