Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
Sign in to follow this  
TheCountOfNowhere

I Often Wonder What The Failed Buyer Thinks When He Sees This...

Recommended Posts

I often wonder what the failed buyer thinks when he sees this...

http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-48733487.html?premiumA=true

"13/01/2015

Price changed: from '£209,995' to '£199,950'
15/11/2014
Price changed: from '£214,995' to '£209,995'
12/11/2014
Status changed: Premium Listing, null, null
06/11/2014
Status changed: from 'Sold STC' to 'null'
29/10/2014
Status changed: from 'null' to 'Sold STC'
16/10/2014
Initial entry found. "
Is £199K the levelk the offer that failed was at.
Is the failed buyer now thinking, "lucky escape" or "now it's a bargain"
Since 3 beds in decent areas were selling for 190K in Northamptons in 2007, and dropped to below £160K before the government used our taxes to make us pay more for a house, these prices are just plain daft.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IT don't look like a bad house. When I see 'conservatories' like this I often wonder why the owners didn't get a proper insulated roof installed and have it as a proper dining room. Surely it can't cost much more and you could now build that under permitted development rights.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IT don't look like a bad house. When I see 'conservatories' like this I often wonder why the owners didn't get a proper insulated roof installed and have it as a proper dining room. Surely it can't cost much more and you could now build that under permitted development rights.

It's more than a conservatory - it is built more like an extension, but the heat loss through the glass ceiling must be terrible.

Ambitious garden, but I would hate to see the bill to re-do the decking when it comes due.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes. Hunsbury needs to be down to £125-150k to go back to 2009 levels...the eastern district £100k or so.

If this sort of place has become unsellable at those prices because of fls and Mmr we might see that by the end of the year.

One can only hope.

Something is definitely afoot in our local market.

Edited by TheCountOfNowhere

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know I've had my brain washed by the VI's over the years. but I don't see Northampton as that expensive and Leicester is even cheaper.

I think my parents old three bed detached in New Duston must still only be worth around £170k. They paid £3500 for it 1963 and sold for £12.5k in 1971. My Dad didn't think they would last long.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's more than a conservatory - it is built more like an extension, but the heat loss through the glass ceiling must be terrible.

Ambitious garden, but I would hate to see the bill to re-do the decking when it comes due.

Anything material that allows the passage of light, allows the passage of heat. I instantly click off any Rightmove listing that shows a conservatory, or shoddy extension with polycabornate roof.

Also not keen on new fangled glass design houses. R-values not so good even for triple-glazed large excellence, and of course can lose efficiency or mist up. Want to buy a house at a non-crazy price, before get hit with all the expense of maintenance and repair of failing stuff like double glazing and cheapo extensions with polycarbo roof.

As I first warned readers 10 years ago, a conservatory is not a habitable room, being too cold in winter and too hot in summer. Research at Cranfield University has shown that the average south-facing conservatory reaches a comfortable temperature for only two hours a day, unless energy is expended on artificial heating or cooling. The glass or polycarbonate roof and walls have minimal insulation value, and a conservatory is little more than a greenhouse tacked onto the side of a house. Unfortunately, instead of paying just a few hundred pounds for a lean-to greenhouse, many people have been persuaded by glossy advertising to pay £20,000 or £30,000, or more, for a conservatory. The conservatory industry has relied for its huge profits on a few slick sales points – that a conservatory is a cheaper way of providing space than a proper extension; that it will be erected with little disruption in a week or so; and that conservatories do not require planning permission or Building Regulations approval.

Furthermore, fitting insulation and plasterboard inside an existing glass or polycarbonate roof entails some risks. Condensation forming on the underside of the glazing on winter nights might drip onto the insulation and damage the plasterboard ceiling. The companies claim that cross-ventilation will prevent this happening but – as we have seen with loft insulation in normal house roofs – some degree of condensation is inevitable. My main reservation, however, concerns the long-term watertightness of the existing conservatory roof. Polycarbonate roofs have a life expectancy of 10 years or less, and even the most expensive glass roofs can suffer rubber gasket deterioration within a similar time frame. Then what happens when the roof leaks onto the new plasterboard ceiling below?

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/property/propertyadvice/9043838/Conservatory-roof-remove-glazing-and-fit-a-proper-roof.html

By Jeff Howell 4:33PM BST 27 Oct 2010

..Answer: It depends what you mean by cost-effective, I suppose. Any material that allows the passage of light also allows the passage of heat. The latest high-performance sealed glazed units (solar glass outer pane, argon filling, heat-reflective inner pane) have a thermal insulation value around one third that of an insulated roof and cost from £12 to £16 per square metre.

Compared with the existing polycarbonate sheet, they might save enough energy to pay for themselves in 10 years or so. Although my sources tell me that the argon gas filling will have leaked out long before that and you will have no way of telling that it has gone. And of course unless the glazing is installed according to British Standard 6262, in drained, vented rebates, then the units will also have misted up internally before reaching the payback date.

Regardless of the economics, however, I would advise you to have the roof glazed. Otherwise the sound of rain drumming on the polycarbonate roof will drive you to distraction.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/property/propertyadvice/jeffhowell/8090353/Home-improvements-polycarbonate-roofs.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just at 6.5 times they'll average wage. Must be a bargain.

looks cheap to me , but then don`t know the local area

Edited by longgone

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • The Prime Minister stated that there were three Brexit options available to the UK:   206 members have voted

    1. 1. Which of the Prime Minister's options would you choose?


      • Leave with the negotiated deal
      • Remain
      • Leave with no deal

    Please sign in or register to vote in this poll. View topic


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.