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SarahBell

Compulsive Hoarding Of Food

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A friend has just posted a photo on FB of the stash of food her husband has been keeping in the garage. It's not the worst food mountain I've ever seen, but she sees it as a problem.

Is food hoarding wrong?

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A friend has just posted a photo on FB of the stash of food her husband has been keeping in the garage. It's not the worst food mountain I've ever seen, but she sees it as a problem.

Is food hoarding wrong?

Hoarding perishables is silly and will attract rats.

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I

want to eat all my tinned food up, before the next voyage! I shall never visit Earth again!

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Would be worth finding out why. I know of some post-war migrants from Italy who keep masses of food stored around their house because of memories of shortages. Providing it is eaten/replaced - I see no problem with it. Actually quite a good anti-inflation measure if you buy in food drops.

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Is he a survivalist / prepper.. Or is there another reason he's doing it?

If I was the wife I'd be more bothered that if it doesn't ever get eaten then it's just a waste of space and money.

Outside of that I don't see the harm.

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He might be like me - a country boy.

When I was growing up, full larders were essential. Come winter, doubly so. When it's a 40 minute drive to buy a pint of milk, you make sure you've got plenty of everything in stock at all times. When there's snow and that 40 minute drive is an impossibility, you'd better have a couple of weeks (at least) worth of supplies in the cellar.

In some respects, the old way was the honest way. Urbanites these days, with multiple supermarkets around them, don't realise how fragile their food supply chain actually is.

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He might be like me - a country boy.

When I was growing up, full larders were essential. Come winter, doubly so. When it's a 40 minute drive to buy a pint of milk, you make sure you've got plenty of everything in stock at all times. When there's snow and that 40 minute drive is an impossibility, you'd better have a couple of weeks (at least) worth of supplies in the cellar.

In some respects, the old way was the honest way. Urbanites these days, with multiple supermarkets around them, don't realise how fragile their food supply chain actually is.

I'm pretty much a turnip head too, so I hoard tinned stuff!

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He might be like me - a country boy.

Being a country girl would work as an excuse for me too! My gran's larder was always well stocked. And she had a cupboard full of jam.

I have been addressing the jam issue though and now I've discovered rumptoff made with vodka instead of rum, I may never waste fruit on jam again.

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I hoard tinned food in the garage and some flour etc in the house every winter - and I've always been glad I did so. Living in the countryside means you have to store staples and wood and coal. You know it makes sense.

...bulk buying only means fewer journeys to the shops, it can also mean in some cases receiving a discount....I can't see how keeping a supply of food to eat later is different to keeping a supply of money to spend later is.... ;)

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I like to hoard food.

As a lowly serf, sorry, private rental sector tenant, I don't have the space or security of tenure to hoard food anywhere except around my waist.

That's my excuse and I'm sticking to it.

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Hoarding perishables is silly and will attract rats.

Not practical to can own food, but persevering and pickling is easy to do, also heat treating and bottling such as fresh apple juice. Anyone with a freezer can bag all sorts of fruit and veg to use later rather than let it ferment and rot to throw away and waste.

There is a good, but old book you can get called 'A comprehensive guide to deep freezing' lists all kinds of perishable foods and how to prepare them for the freezer to use later, label and date and rotate.......do that when cheap and or in season, will also know always at hand if required quickly as an ingredient for a recipe. ;)

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I think 'hoarding' is probably a result of feeling some degree of insecurity about the future, but that's not always a bad thing. I usually keep a couple of months supply of stuff with a long shelf life, such as flour, UHT milk, canned foods, etc. If bad weather is forecast, or a war has just broken out, or there's a strike at an oil refinery, I might stockpile a bit more.

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Being a country girl would work as an excuse for me too! My gran's larder was always well stocked. And she had a cupboard full of jam.

I have been addressing the jam issue though and now I've discovered rumptoff made with vodka instead of rum, I may never waste fruit on jam again.

I will come round to your house and eat it all, when you are not looking! :blink:

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I will come round to your house and eat it all, when you are not looking! :blink:

Eat?.

It's a drink. Well the drained fruit is in the freezer waiting for to be turned into a crumble.

It's the best drink ever!

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Now your teasing us...could you post the recipe or would that just be too Mumsnet?

Fruit, sugar, vodka.

Repeat until container is full.

Use different fruits.

I had blackcurrant, raspberry, strawberry and blackberry.

Leave until Christmas. Strain fruit out and then drink.

Eat fruit in crumble.

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Fruit, sugar, vodka.

Repeat until container is full.

Use different fruits.

I had blackcurrant, raspberry, strawberry and blackberry.

Leave until Christmas. Strain fruit out and then drink.

Eat fruit in crumble.

Needs more vodka.

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Hoarding perishables is silly and will attract rats.

So, go and bake yourself a nice nutritious rat pie, to follow the rat soup and the rats eyes and rats balls delicacies.

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Is food 'hoarding' necessarily 'compulsive'? I think it is quite rational, within reason.

"Within reason" being perhaps the operative phrase.

How many tins do you have with "best before" ... some date last century?

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He might be like me - a country boy.

When I was growing up, full larders were essential. Come winter, doubly so. When it's a 40 minute drive to buy a pint of milk, you make sure you've got plenty of everything in stock at all times. When there's snow and that 40 minute drive is an impossibility, you'd better have a couple of weeks (at least) worth of supplies in the cellar.

In some respects, the old way was the honest way. Urbanites these days, with multiple supermarkets around them, don't realise how fragile their food supply chain actually is.

On that scale, yes. But your winter-emergency supply needn't be at the level of luxury you'd choose to eat in normal times.

What about hoarding food internally? Eat all you can this meal, because you don't know when you'll be able to get the next? That's a habit I find hard to shake off.

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