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dinker

Marine Le Pen

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The nutcases in Paris have made it certain that Marine Le Pen will be the next President of France and, as she hates the EU, making it probable that France will cause the breakup of the EU,

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Isnt she like all the other continental euroskeptics...anti euro but pro EU? I think this is AfD and Syrizas position, at least.

But yes, I think Europe needs a strongly nationalist president (or dozen), If only to display the (rather obvious) fact you can be a nationalist without being a mass murderer. The Japanese have managed it since 1945, I see no reason why nations in europe cant do the same.

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Isnt she like all the other continental euroskeptics...anti euro but pro EU? I think this is AfD and Syrizas position, at least.

But yes, I think Europe needs a strongly nationalist president (or dozen), If only to display the (rather obvious) fact you can be a nationalist without being a mass murderer. The Japanese have managed it since 1945, I see no reason why nations in europe cant do the same.

No, the FN is pretty much anti-EU as much as anti-euro.

Le Pen as president would lead to civil war in France. The establishment have far too much at stake to let that happen.

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I've come to the conclusion that federalism leads to nationalism.

So, whereas individual countries would more likely have parties drawn along economic/social lines, when joined to another central power, the rise of nationalist parties seems to be the outcome.

This is a natural outcome as a way of ensuring your representatives fight for you and your area. See how Labour have sold the north and Scotlad/Wales before that down the swanny....primarily because the representatives are more interested in their careers on a bigger stage and quite prepared to sell their constituents out for their own or what they would deem 'wider' puroposes.

The same has happened on the European stage. For instance in Greece the voters see their own leaders selling out to the European project and against their own interests.

Countering that statement, is understanding why the likes of a decentralised Germany or the United States don't appear to suffer the same outcome.

On Marine Le Pen...it did cross my mind that possibly protesters were holding up pens partly as a political answer rather than a statement that the pen is more powerful than the sword.

Great theory apart form the fact that they were holding up a "stylo" not a "pen"

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I've come to the conclusion that federalism leads to nationalism.

So, whereas individual countries would more likely have parties drawn along economic/social lines, when joined to another central power, the rise of nationalist parties seems to be the outcome.

This is a natural outcome as a way of ensuring your representatives fight for you and your area. See how Labour have sold the north and Scotlad/Wales before that down the swanny....primarily because the representatives are more interested in their careers on a bigger stage and quite prepared to sell their constituents out for their own or what they would deem 'wider' puroposes.

The same has happened on the European stage. For instance in Greece the voters see their own leaders selling out to the European project and against their own interests.

Countering that statement, is understanding why the likes of a decentralised Germany or the United States don't appear to suffer the same outcome.

Yep - most definitely in Wales.

There is appalling poverty still in Wales but it never gets reported on the Welsh News let alone on UK National News. Arguably, Labour loves the Welsh poverty as it allows them to keep a hardcore of dumb sheep voting them in. Hence why, increasingly, London parachutes in MP candidates from London into safe Welsh Labour seats and, as far as the Assembly is concerned, just let the Welsh speaking nationalist nutjob lot pay themselves vast salaries and run Wales into the ground.

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I had to check that. Maybe it went into France from England....a bit like 'pizza' to Italy.

Or maybe you are saying 'entrepreneur' merely means 'contractor' without all those fuzzy romantic connotations politicians like to put on it about innovation, go getting, risk taking and stuff.

http://dictionary.reverso.net/french-english/entrepreneur

It was in reference to an alleged quote by George W. Bush, discussing the decline of the French economy with Teflon Tony: "The problem with the French is that they don't have a word for entrepreneur."

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Well, thinking about it, maybe they don't. Not in the same way we connote the word. Here, it is given a very high status in the economic pantheon. The driver of innovation and creator of jobs. There it may be looked on as little more than a grubby landlord, a rip off corner shop, a recruitment agent, estate agent etc.

Au contraire: ( link )

The term "Entrepreneur" was used more in romance language than

in the English-speaking world. Perhaps this is due to its origins
being tied to Richard Cantillon, a banker, economist and writer
who lived a very adventurous life. Joseph A. Schumpeter, in his
History of Economic Analysis explains: "First, Cantillon had a
clear conception of the function of the entrepreneur. It was
quite general, but he analyzed it with particular care for the
case of the farmer. The farmer pays out contractual incomes,
which are therefore 'certain', to landlords and laborers; he
sells at prices that are 'uncertain'. So do drapers and other
'merchants': they all commit themselves to certain payments in
expectation of uncertain receipts and are therefore essentially
risk-bearing directors of production and trade, competition
tending to reduce their remuneration to the normal value of their
services. This, of course, is scholastic doctrine. But nobody
before Cantillon had formulated it so fully. And it may be due to
him that French economists, unlike the English, never lost sight
of the entrepreneurial function and its central importance."
"Entrepreneur", then, was used for the first time by Richard
Cantillon (around 1680-1734) in his Essai sur la nature du
commerce en général. Traduit de l'anglois, first published in
French after his death in 1755.

Interesting, but we may have drifted off topic a bit.

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They don't have a word for "entrepreneur", apparently.

they do but only on Le Weekend

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I had to check that. Maybe it went into France from England....a bit like 'pizza' to Italy.

Or maybe you are saying 'entrepreneur' merely means 'contractor' without all those fuzzy romantic connotations politicians like to put on it about innovation, go getting, risk taking and stuff.

http://dictionary.reverso.net/french-english/entrepreneur

hmmm what's that whooshing sounds, oh year, humour going right over your head!

IT IS A JOKE

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hmmm what's that whooshing sounds, oh year, humour going right over your head!

IT IS A JOKE

Clearly you need to start with the words "THIS IS A JOKE"

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