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SarahBell

Ice Challenge Charity Under Attack After Mouse Experiments

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Naive to think they wouldn't.

The outcomes of the research are ultimately peer reviewed one way or another. This implies strongly they ARE useful. And would also raise red flags if it wasn't.

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I'm sure experiments on prisoners would be useful too.

It's a balance between 'use' and 'cost'. Using prisoners is too far in one direction, but banning the use of fruit flies is too far in the other direction. Where to draw lines though?

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Well that's a rather emotively written article that deliberately mixes the facts to give a false impression.

Stop conflating facts, stop being emotive, and I'll happily engage with them.

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Mice < humans

They're not doing it for the fun of it. If they were they could go and work as pest controllers.

Misanthropic greenies. They should go and feed themselves to the wolves.

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So millions of people got involved with a media-driven mass movement without doing the most basic research, and then expect something to be done when it turns out not to be something they like. Sounds like the housing market to me.

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So millions of people got involved with a media-driven mass movement without doing the most basic research, and then expect something to be done when it turns out not to be something they like. Sounds like the housing market to me.

Well it's actually another charity banging the drum this time.

Animal aid.

Save some fluffy mice or cure a nasty disease?

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Well it's actually another charity banging the drum this time.

Animal aid.

Save some fluffy mice or cure a nasty disease?

Maybe Animal Aid can set up a drop your hair dryer in the bath challenge so that people can experience some of the pain that animals go through. Bucket loads of idiots would do it :-)

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Well that's a rather emotively written article that deliberately mixes the facts to give a false impression.

Stop conflating facts, stop being emotive, and I'll happily engage with them.

Arguably whether something is ethical or not is a fundamentally emotive question.

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thats why i refused to be a sheeple and do it cause of their animal experiments.

+1

Not worth the collateral damage IMO. Shame as I had quite a brilliant idea lined up.

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So millions of people got involved with a media-driven mass movement without doing the most basic research, and then expect something to be done when it turns out not to be something they like. Sounds like the housing market to me.

Hilarious!

Makes me think though. Has anybody ever organised a massive social-media hoax that sucked in lots of idiots then showed them up for the fools they were? Something along the lines of Chris Morris' fake question in Parliament about the drug 'cake', for example, but on a much larger viral scale?

One hears lots of silly urban myths online but they don't seem to go viral in the same way as things like Ice Bucket Challenge.

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Makes me think though. Has anybody ever organised a massive social-media hoax that sucked in lots of idiots then showed them up for the fools they were?

They're called "elections".

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I had a quick look at the papers quoted in that report by Victimsofcharity.org. I've got a previous interest in laboratory mice as I have a neurological disease and the subject has come up in relation to research our own charities have funded.

The main gripe as far I as can see is not to do with any actual experiments on mice to find a cure for ALS but with the breeding of specific mice with genetic mutations that scientists study.

For example, mice breed with a SOD1 genetic mutation can develop muscular weakness, paralysis and death. They study the mice hoping to learn more about how the same type of gene mutation might work in humans. The mice can be killed and their spinal columns studied.

How this is translating into better understanding of ALS I don't know. I'd have to read further on their claims about the failure of actual medical treatments based on the SOD1 model above.

In the case of research funded by charities I belong to (and into another neurological disease) we are not finding that those based on mouse behaviour or testing to be useful so far.

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How this is translating into better understanding of ALS I don't know. I'd have to read further on their claims about the failure of actual medical treatments based on the SOD1 model above.

Not every experiment or course of action will work so a failure of any treatments to appear probably just means it wasn't a useful road to go down. You don't know that before you start for certain (although you should have some idea which are the most promising). Something's wrong if every series of experiments results in something useful. Even negative results are useful (something is ruled out), indeed one of the most famous experiments in physics was an unexpected negative result (the Michelson–Morley experiment)

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