Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

spyguy

Bbc License Sweep-Stake

Recommended Posts

Not for any 'left-winged' bias/statist - although I find the BBC news crap. FFS how can you spend so much and produce such content free cr.p?

I've seen sod all BBC this Christmas. Really. I'm scratching my head for anything I've watched that I can remember was BBC.

I don't watch soaps, don't watch light entertainment cr.p.

I've watched a couple of things off Netflix + Prime.

I've watched more channel 5 + channel 4 than BBC

Kids are playing their console on the TV rather than watch CBBC.

How can you justify £145/year when Netflix is ~ £80/year?

I listen to R4. But all the radio stations are a small percentage of the BBC budget.

What are the options?

1) No increase. Ever.

2) Reduction of fee, say, to £100?

3) Make the license voluntary i.e. no way for the BBC to chase it any more. Then all those middle class twats can gladly pay 1,000/year to avoid 'American rubbish' - Its American 'rubbish' like Gotham thats keeping my away from the BBC finest of, err, Eastenders and, err, Im stuck now, help me!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you can move your all of your TV watching to catchup/on demand/DVD/downloads only - you can stop paying the licence fee perfectly legally. Oh, and don't record any live TV either.

The only BBC thing I watched over Xmas was Doctor Who. I stopped watching any TV news a couple of years ago. I listen to the Archers - but would give it up if asked to pay for it - and if push came to shove, I'd buy Doctor Who on blu-ray only.

Personally, I think TV's days are numbered. I know of an increasing number of 20 somethings and younger who watch only around 2 hours a week, and it's never traditional terrestrial TV - but more likely YouTube clips or the odd downloaded show.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Been trying no licence and no live tv for a year since moving, and now used to it. Not an anti-BBC/state thing, just because I hardly watched anything and I suppose partly the principle of having to pay. Most films and programs are available online. I suspect they'll make iplayer a subscription service tied to the licence, or find another way to get taxpayers to pay.

And fwiw it's worth the telephone service to cancel is useless, but the inspector who came round to check was a nice chap who probably first had a look through the front window and after telling him I don't watch just noted it down and left.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would be happy to pay a small radio licence/tax.....TV programmes should be on a pay as you go basis....I very much doubt I would actually use it, but nice to have the choice instead of being forced to buy it to watch other interesting programmes on other channels......no way does any other company have that advantage.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No excuse or justification for it to be anything other than voluntary subscription based.

Surely they are biased to more immigration too if it creates more licensees for them to harass and threaten

with criminal sanctions?

I am legally licence free and watch/record no live TV but watch the odd thing on catchup. I'd probably pay £5 a month but not £145 a year! I could buy boxsets of all the BBC shows I watch for a fraction of that.

I get monthly bangs on the door from the TV inspector, which I never respond too. I quite like this as it wastes their money and time which is the only way things will change. The politicians are spineless. The TV Licence is fascism.

I am surprised it isn't against EU competition rules...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No excuse or justification for it to be anything other than voluntary subscription based.

Surely they are biased to more immigration too if it creates more licensees for them to harass and threaten

with criminal sanctions?

I am legally licence free and watch/record no live TV but watch the odd thing on catchup. I'd probably pay £5 a month but not £145 a year! I could buy boxsets of all the BBC shows I watch for a fraction of that.

I get monthly bangs on the door from the TV inspector, which I never respond too. I quite like this as it wastes their money and time which is the only way things will change. The politicians are spineless. The TV Licence is fascism.

I am surprised it isn't against EU competition rules...

I think I am about to get my first 'bang on the door'

I have never had a TV and the last 6 months has seen a ramping up of threatening letters, each with an invitation to go online and say I don't need a license.

I went online to do so and was faced with a load of questions unrelated to the simple 'do you need a TV license',

So I didn't use the online option

They can chase all they like.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been legally licence-free for just over a year. The threatening letters go straight in the recycling but they're very infrequent these days anyway. Over Christmas at my parents house I was genuinely surprised at the sight of a screen blaring out a constant stream of rubbish in the corner of the room. I failed to find anything I wanted to watch, except Carlito's Way which was on Channel 4 at 1.30 in the morning :rolleyes:.

Don't miss it; don't want it; don't pay for it.

Oh, to answer the question - I think the TV license will be surprisingly enduring, just like public telephone boxes. You can already see the future model in play - No reduction in the cost of the license and a general refocusing on TV output towards content which is cheap to produce, sprinkled with a few flagship shows that can be re-sold internationally (Dr Who, Top Gear, nature documentaries etc). Most of the British public would happily pay to watch someone bake a flippin' cake anyway. If you want comprehensive information, specialist knowledge or in-depth analysis then you have to go online.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to say that BBC documentaries are the best in the world. Not even Channel 4 can compete and I can't stand docos narrated by Americans.

They have David Attenborough, Alice Roberts, Iain Stewart, Mary Beard, Jim Al-Khalili, Chris Packham, Michael Scott, Stephen Baxter, Dan Snow, Michael Wood, Nicholas Crane, and more.

I can't keep up with all of the documentaries!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The BBC license fee has gotten out of all alignment with prices in the digital media space.

It actually costs more than my monthly mobile phone and home broadband now.

Thats the crux of my point.

Digital media is cheap as chips; the license is not.

And you can choose chips, mash, or salad. I get served Eastenders + strictly no matter what.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to say that BBC documentaries are the best in the world. Not even Channel 4 can compete and I can't stand docos narrated by Americans.

They have David Attenborough, Alice Roberts, Iain Stewart, Mary Beard, Jim Al-Khalili, Chris Packham, Michael Scott, Stephen Baxter, Dan Snow, Michael Wood, Nicholas Crane, and more.

I can't keep up with all of the documentaries!

How many new documentaries with the people you mention or equivalent have been broadcast in the past 6 months? Then look at the number of new "documentaries" that have been broadcast in the past 6 months on BBC3 or with the clowns from Top Gear. Content from the BBC has been in a nosedive for the past year. It's like they have a complete death wish or something.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to say that BBC documentaries are the best in the world. Not even Channel 4 can compete and I can't stand docos narrated by Americans.

They have David Attenborough, Alice Roberts, Iain Stewart, Mary Beard, Jim Al-Khalili, Chris Packham, Michael Scott, Stephen Baxter, Dan Snow, Michael Wood, Nicholas Crane, and more.

I can't keep up with all of the documentaries!

I think that was true at one time - not so sure nowadays. Horizon has gone seriously downhill in the last couple of decades.

I was quite impressed by the BBC3 series about the first world war. Seemed well tailored to its intended audience.

They probably still hold their own on the wildlife documentary front. But then they should given they have had dedicated filming units for yonks and it often feels like a repackage of existing wildlife spectacles - perhaps updated with new filming technology. I would be hard pushed to pick out one Attenborough series from another over the last couple of decades.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Been trying no licence and no live tv for a year since moving, and now used to it. Not an anti-BBC/state thing, just because I hardly watched anything and I suppose partly the principle of having to pay. Most films and programs are available online. I suspect they'll make iplayer a subscription service tied to the licence, or find another way to get taxpayers to pay.

And fwiw it's worth the telephone service to cancel is useless, but the inspector who came round to check was a nice chap who probably first had a look through the front window and after telling him I don't watch just noted it down and left.

When I enquired when offspring was at Uni they told me that fee depends on whether you have equipment capable of receiving a live broadcast. So a TV with an aerial = capable even if you choose not to. Not sure how it works with a laptop since it is capable of watching a live feed so technically appears to require a licence even if you choose not to watch (cynic in me says thats why they added "watch live" to bbc website)

Did your inspector comment on this at all?

Agree with OP - impossible to understand how it can be so expensive to basically air Eastenders, Strictly for 3 months and NEWS 24 plus a handful of talking heads progs like Daily politics.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I enquired when offspring was at Uni they told me that fee depends on whether you have equipment capable of receiving a live broadcast. So a TV with an aerial = capable even if you choose not to. Not sure how it works with a laptop since it is capable of watching a live feed so technically appears to require a licence even if you choose not to watch (cynic in me says thats why they added "watch live" to bbc website)

Did your inspector comment on this at all?

Agree with OP - impossible to understand how it can be so expensive to basically air Eastenders, Strictly for 3 months and NEWS 24 plus a handful of talking heads progs like Daily politics.

No that's a myth; you only have a tv licence liability if you actually watch or record live broadcasts. It's irrelevant whether you have receiving equipment or not http://www.tvlicensing.co.uk/check-if-you-need-one/topics/technology--devices-and-online-top8. Inspector didn't comment on it at all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's no need to do anything.

Normal cost increases and the rise of the households legally licence-free, including mine, being at 5% and counting will mean the vast splurging of cash on "talent", execs and films / sports coverage that the other channels would carry anyway will mean that the BBC will dwindle into marginalised nothingness.

Good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No that's a myth; you only have a tv licence liability if you actually watch or record live broadcasts. It's irrelevant whether you have receiving equipment or not http://www.tvlicensing.co.uk/check-if-you-need-one/topics/technology--devices-and-online-top8. Inspector didn't comment on it at all.

helpful ta. Site has changed since I looked into this 4 yrs ao. So its down to self-certification on any device. Nice and simple. Not sure how they verify it or if they bother

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven`t had a TV for around 9 years, I get a visit from the licence police every two years. I even try to take them by arm and drag them in.

5%? Interesting....

is you TV license grunt attractive, with big boobs?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to say that BBC documentaries are the best in the world. Not even Channel 4 can compete and I can't stand docos narrated by Americans.

They have David Attenborough, Alice Roberts, Iain Stewart, Mary Beard, Jim Al-Khalili, Chris Packham, Michael Scott, Stephen Baxter, Dan Snow, Michael Wood, Nicholas Crane, and more.

I can't keep up with all of the documentaries!

The quantity of documentary output seems to have fallen over the last couple of years, especially the OU stuff which has more information content and less "look at these plants/stars/waves/animals moving in slow motion, isn't the universe amazing?" filler.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just having a look through what I watch on TV, the only programs I have watched is Homelands and Marvel's Agents of Shield (well, yet to watch). Ok, I record a few films too, and maybe a few documentaries.

I would gladly give up the licence fee and go for Netflix if I had a decent connection.

When/if I move, I think that will be the end of the licence fee for me.

Edit to add. It will be interesting if I moved into a house with a satellite dish/aerial on the side, I bet the inspectors try to use that as justification to hound me!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No that's a myth; you only have a tv licence liability if you actually watch or record live broadcasts. It's irrelevant whether you have receiving equipment or not http://www.tvlicensing.co.uk/check-if-you-need-one/topics/technology--devices-and-online-top8. Inspector didn't comment on it at all.

^ this as they say on the internet.

You can gave sky, virgin and every other TV service - and still not need a licence. Its completely irrelevant - but what they use to harass you (as proven by the recent amendment to the malicious threatening communications act)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What if you can watch cable and don't have a TV receiver as such?

Same thing. Its nowt to do with equipment or ability - and all to do with actually doing it or not. Their own website even makes this very clear (in between the threats).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone with a PC or smartphone is capable of streaming live broadcasts, yet you do not need a TV license to own a laptop. The same principle applies to TVs etc, as ccc/northener point out-you only require a license if you watch live broadcasts, and you need one whatever platform you access them from- internet streaming, mobile network streaming, cable or good 'ole fashioned aerial.

Catch up services, youtube, netflix etc= no license.

Rooms full of TVs, smart devices and PCs which are not used to watch live telly = no license.

There are multitudes of subtleties/caveats, but that is the basic rule you can rely on. Unfortunately Auntie is not overly concerned about inspectors being too up on this, as they are commission driven sales types who may attempt to ensnare if you do not play ball, so just write to the Beeb and tell them you are withdrawing their implied right of access but invite them to deploy their detection technology at your property boundary to satisfy themselves you are compliant with the law.Do not sign anything put in front of you by a license bod.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to say that BBC documentaries are the best in the world. Not even Channel 4 can compete and I can't stand docos narrated by Americans.

They have David Attenborough, Alice Roberts, Iain Stewart, Mary Beard, Jim Al-Khalili, Chris Packham, Michael Scott, Stephen Baxter, Dan Snow, Michael Wood, Nicholas Crane, and more.

I can't keep up with all of the documentaries!

After ditching the BBC licence 6 years ago, I bought this huge box set of DVD's containing all of David Attenborough's 'Life' series

Life on Earth offers a chronological account of the flora and fauna of planet Earth over a period of 3,500 million years.

The Living Planet: An ambitious 12-part documentary that spanned the globe with portraits of each of the major geographical regions that offer a home to life.

Trials of Life: Originally broadcast in 1990, it examines animal behaviour in all its infinite variety and in doing so we are allowed to witness some ofthe most enchanting animal personalities, as will as some of the most fearsome.

Life in the Freezer reveals incomparable standards of natural history filming to trace Antartica's seasonal cycle from the long winter months when the formation of ice almost doubles its surface area, to the brief summer when the race to breed really heats up.

The Private Life of Plants: Attenborough takes us through each aspect of plants' lives travelling, growing, flowering, their struggle with other plants and animals, and the ingenious way they adapt to even the harshest of conditions.

The Life of Birds presents a fascinating and exciting view of the world of birds, the largest animal group on earth, in a series of ten fifty-minute episodes.

The Life of Mammals looks at why mammals are the most successful creatures on the planet.

Life in the Undergrowth: Here David shows us not just bugs, beetles and creepy-crawlies, but scorpions and centipedes, mites and mantids, spiders and dragonflies.

It cost £45 6 years ago for all of those, I still haven't got through the first series!

Alternatively I could have spent around £750 on TV licences

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After ditching the BBC licence 6 years ago, I bought this huge box set of DVD's containing all of David Attenborough's 'Life' series

Life on Earth offers a chronological account of the flora and fauna of planet Earth over a period of 3,500 million years.

The Living Planet: An ambitious 12-part documentary that spanned the globe with portraits of each of the major geographical regions that offer a home to life.

Trials of Life: Originally broadcast in 1990, it examines animal behaviour in all its infinite variety and in doing so we are allowed to witness some ofthe most enchanting animal personalities, as will as some of the most fearsome.

Life in the Freezer reveals incomparable standards of natural history filming to trace Antartica's seasonal cycle from the long winter months when the formation of ice almost doubles its surface area, to the brief summer when the race to breed really heats up.

The Private Life of Plants: Attenborough takes us through each aspect of plants' lives travelling, growing, flowering, their struggle with other plants and animals, and the ingenious way they adapt to even the harshest of conditions.

The Life of Birds presents a fascinating and exciting view of the world of birds, the largest animal group on earth, in a series of ten fifty-minute episodes.

The Life of Mammals looks at why mammals are the most successful creatures on the planet.

Life in the Undergrowth: Here David shows us not just bugs, beetles and creepy-crawlies, but scorpions and centipedes, mites and mantids, spiders and dragonflies.

It cost £45 6 years ago for all of those, I still haven't got through the first series!

Alternatively I could have spent around £750 on TV licences

And one of his best is available for free

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xsynjb_blank-on-the-map-by-david-attenborough_shortfilms

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • The Prime Minister stated that there were three Brexit options available to the UK:   215 members have voted

    1. 1. Which of the Prime Minister's options would you choose?


      • Leave with the negotiated deal
      • Remain
      • Leave with no deal

    Please sign in or register to vote in this poll. View topic


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.