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Right To Buy Could Be Scrapped By Council Housing Bosses (Brighton And Hove)

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Good! Comes into force across Scotland in 2016. Hope other local authorities follow suit.

I would have thought that there might have been a clause in the sale of council housing stating that the properties could never be let on a private basis. However, I guess that it wasn't a consideration in 1980 given that there was a decent choice of tenure.

One thought: wouldn't this lead to an buying frenzy amongst more affluent council tenants in Brighton & Hove in the interim? :unsure:

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Yup now I'm eligible I thought they would pull up that drawbridge

Right to buy was about the only avenue left to buy a property at 'fair value'

Can only mean there isn't much left worth selling.

Thailand it is then. Fck UK. Fck LabourTory and Fck the Rentier/Banker State

Edited by aSecureTenant

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I would have thought that there might have been a clause in the sale of council housing stating that the properties could never be let on a private basis. However, I guess that it wasn't a consideration in 1980 given that there was a decent choice of tenure.

Whilst I agree it's bad that some of these properties end up in the hands of buy to let landlords, by putting a covenant on the property like that you will reduce its sale value, thus it almost becomes pointless offering a right to buy discount at all.

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Yup now I'm eligible I thought they would pull up that drawbridge

Right to buy was about the only avenue left to buy a property at 'fair value'

Can only mean there isn't much left worth selling.

Thailand it is then. Fck UK. Fck LabourTory and Fck the Rentier/Banker State

you're right - it's another babyboomer act of war against later generations

of course givinhg away subsidised houses to the poor of later generations would be wrong when there's ageing baby boomer state entitlements to be met - after all they never paid in when they wewre working so why on earth should they start now?

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Yes well, I`m a council dweller and I`m going off the idea . Btw, we have no kids.

I`m 55 so I only have to pay rent for about 10 years, then benefits will pay! I wouldn't want anyone to say we`re getting a free house!

Thailand? Have you had a look at Youtube? Replaces one set of problems with another set.

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I'm a council tenant and when I signed my lease it was no right-to-buy.

Not bothered.

Bedroom window cracked on a windy day - council fixed it within an hour. None of that heart-stopping "oh no how much is that going to cost me?".

Council houses - once seen as lowest of low - now very much to be aspired to!

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British local authorities looking for ways to combat an escalating housing crisis are buying back social housing they previously sold off at a discount — incurring huge losses in the process.

In the United Kingdom, social housing is provided at low rents on secure terms to people who would otherwise not be able to meet housing costs.

Allocated on a basis of need, around 17 percent of the British population lives in social housing, which is normally owned by local councils or not-for-profit organizations like housing associations.

A government policy — first put in place by Conservative Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher — which encourages tenants to buy these homes at a discount has led to the sale of 20,000 homes since 2012. However, just 5,000 new homes have been built in their place.

An investigation by The Times of London has found that at least nine local authorities are repurchasing at market value homes they once sold off at a discount of up to 70 percent.

Developers are aggravating the UK's housing crisis by ducking affordable home targets. Read more here

Leeds Council paid nearly £1.24 million for 15 homes it had sold over the decades for the collective sum of £411,000 in today's prices.

The local authority sold off 462 council properties to tenants in 2013-14, and plans to buy back another 100 former council properties next year.

In 1980 Thatcher encouraged home ownership under the "Right to Buy" scheme, which allowed social housing tenants to buy the property from the state at a 33 percent to 50 percent discount.

David Cameron increased the Right to Buy discount to a maximum of 70 percent in 2012 as a way of revitalizing the housing market and funding new housing.

The scheme has been criticized for handing properties to private landlords, however, ultimately heaping more pressure on local authority waiting lists for social housing. There are currently 1.7 million households on this list, according to government figures.

Brighton and Hove Council in southern England used this argument last week as it made a formal request to the government to become the first local authority to scrap Right to Buy. The scheme will be abolished in Scotland from 2017 following a Scottish government ruling last year.

Other local authorities have also bought back social housing, including Barnsley in south Yorkshire, which has purchased 35 homes in the past 18 months while selling off 111 in 2013-14. Welwyn Hatfield sold off 99 over the last financial year and has bought back 21.

'This is the social cleansing of London' — housing protests as world's largest property fair comes to town. Read more here.

In October, Islington council was reported to be planning a buyback of 20 former council homes judged to be value for money — using money generated from the sale of Right to Buy homes. Doncaster, Sandwell, Ealing and Hillingdon authorities have also expressed interest in buyback.

Catherine Ryder, head of policy at the National Federation of Housing, told VICE News that Right to Buy was an "unworkable system."

She said: "We are calling on the government to reform the policy to ensure that not only are all houses replaced one-for-one, but also like-for-like, to help end the housing crisis within a generation.

She added: "The huge discounts being offered mean there is not enough money from the sales to build desperately needed new homes to replace them."

Brandon Lewis, the housing minister, said: "The reinvigorated Right to Buy helps social tenants get onto the housing ladder, increases housing construction and reduces social housing waiting lists. Every additional home sold will be replaced with an affordable home."


https://news.vice.com/article/uk-authorities-sold-off-social-housing-at-a-discount-now-they-are-buying-it-back-at-a-loss

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Brandon Lewis, the housing minister, said: "The reinvigorated Right to Buy helps social tenants get onto the housing ladder, increases housing construction and reduces social housing waiting lists. Every additional home sold will be replaced with an affordable home."

...said the objective housing minister with a free taxpayer subsidised and leveraged option on housing and 10% of his Parliamentary Contributory Pension Fund invested in UK Property in 12/13 (target of 10% UK, 2.5% Global Property). https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/277404/0808.pdf

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I like the idea of councils buying back their old stock but it would be best to stop RTB altogether beforehand.

Council Tenant wants to a buy a home? Fine - plenty on the open market to choose from.

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Council Tenant wants to a buy a home? Fine - plenty on the open market to choose from.

yes I thought that too. then again, the idea was that people who had been paying for the upkeep through renting were somehow entitled to a continuity.

I LOVE that idea for all renters. If a RIGHT to buy is a real RIGHT, it MUST apply to ALL Citizens to whom RIGHTS are inalienable...not just some.

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Should give councils the right to buy them back (at 70% discount). :)

Don't you have to offer it to the council if you sell within so many years?

https://www.gov.uk/right-to-buy-buying-your-council-home/selling-your-home

If you sell your home within 10 years of buying it through Right to Buy, you must first offer it to either:

  • your old landlord
  • another social landlord in the area

The property should be sold at the full market price agreed between you and the landlord.

If you can’t agree, a district valuer will say how much your home is worth and set the price. You won’t have to pay for their valuation.

You can sell your home to anyone if the landlord doesn’t agree to buy it within 8 weeks.

You’ll have to pay back some or all of the discount you got if you sell your Right to Buy home within 5 years of buying it.

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Don't you have to offer it to the council if you sell within so many years?

https://www.gov.uk/right-to-buy-buying-your-council-home/selling-your-home

If you sell your home within 10 years of buying it through Right to Buy, you must first offer it to either:

  • your old landlord
  • another social landlord in the area

The property should be sold at the full market price agreed between you and the landlord.

If you can’t agree, a district valuer will say how much your home is worth and set the price. You won’t have to pay for their valuation.

You can sell your home to anyone if the landlord doesn’t agree to buy it within 8 weeks.

You’ll have to pay back some or all of the discount you got if you sell your Right to Buy home within 5 years of buying it.

The thing that I object to most with right to buy, isn't the principle (although I'm a council tenant who would like to buy, so have a slight bias) but it's the fact that you can use the discount as a deposit.

I live on an estate where 1 in 4 people have default on a loan. The area suffers from some deprivation so some of this is understandable but it shows how irresponsible some people are here with money, especially as this region has more well paying jobs and higher employment than average.

People who scrimp and save to save up for a deposit prove that they're able to manage their finances over and above people who can't and you'd think they'd also be people less likely to default on loans.

So allowing people to use the discount as a deposit seems complete and utter madness to me, must increase the level of mortgage defaults too.

Also I wonder how many properties would be sold if everyone had to save up at least 5-10k first?

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