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moedo12

Where Are The Cheapest New Builds?

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Also where do you think they're likely to be in future. My general impression is that new builds tend to be overvalued (about £30k on one bed flats in an average area I think) and the developers seem to operate some kind of cartel to keep it so.

Sadly I'm not in the position to buy a house at the moment, maybe in 2016. So my hope is that the housing market crashes and some sort of help to buy scheme will still be in place, thus I might be able to snap up a newbuild with a low mortgage and an interest free equity loan.

It's probably wishful thinking, and I have a feeling the developers would just take the properties off the market if it crashed and ride it out until the prices go up.

What do you think?

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Have you ever lived in a new-build house ;)

My experiences might be poorer than most, but, the small room sizes, bowing walls, lack of sound proofing, quality issues (e.g. window handles falling off, roof slates falling down) mean I'd be unlikely to ever touch a 'mass-market' (e.g. Barratt) new-build property again.

My take on it is that if "schemes" are available and you can take advantage of them then an older property, possibly one that needs a little bit of work, may prove better value and give more location flexibility.

Not least because, as you say, a new home commands a price premium. But as soon as you've bought it, it's second-hand. A bit like cars.

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Have you ever lived in a new-build house ;)

My experiences might be poorer than most, but, the small room sizes, bowing walls, lack of sound proofing, quality issues (e.g. window handles falling off, roof slates falling down) mean I'd be unlikely to ever touch a 'mass-market' (e.g. Barratt) new-build property again.

My take on it is that if "schemes" are available and you can take advantage of them then an older property, possibly one that needs a little bit of work, may prove better value and give more location flexibility.

Not least because, as you say, a new home commands a price premium. But as soon as you've bought it, it's second-hand. A bit like cars.

I'm currently living in a 1950s council flat, second floor, so have people above and below me. The flat is relatively spacious with a nice hallway, however, there is a huge problem with noise. I can pretty much hear what my upstairs neighbours are saying and I get woken up by people talking along the stairwell in the morning. I can sit in my living room about 5 metres away from the front door, with the living room door shut and it feels like the people in the stairwell are talking in the room, it's that loud.

I'm lucky because I have a very quiet neighbour below me, otherwise it would be a nightmare. It has some charm but it's just annoying with all that noise, I thought that new builds have to meet higher standards of noise abatement.

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I notice a lot of them are priced P.O.A. so they can get young hopefuls into their sales offices, baffle them with discounts and whatever government props currently available, "cos it's a monthly cost, innit?'

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When we lived in a terraced new build, the sound proofing was so poor that when the neighbour's phone rang you got up to answer it.

They were always having rows, and you could hear every single word without even trying.

We did "get them back" by emulating the penguin from Wallace and Gromit, by leaving a Kylie CD playing on repeat at maximum volume while we went out for a few hours.

That was childish and I'm not proud of it (made the point, though) - the other issue was parking. Parking was at such a premium if you parked with any part of your car overlapping the next space by even a few inches, this would result in a knock at the door.

Just my experience - that was a "high density development" (Church Langley, Harlow = Hell on Earth) - there will be good new builds, and bad old-builds.

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When we lived in a terraced new build, the sound proofing was so poor that when the neighbour's phone rang you got up to answer it.

They were always having rows, and you could hear every single word without even trying.

We did "get them back" by emulating the penguin from Wallace and Gromit, by leaving a Kylie CD playing on repeat at maximum volume while we went out for a few hours.

That was childish and I'm not proud of it (made the point, though) - the other issue was parking. Parking was at such a premium if you parked with any part of your car overlapping the next space by even a few inches, this would result in a knock at the door.

Just my experience - that was a "high density development" (Church Langley, Harlow = Hell on Earth) - there will be good new builds, and bad old-builds.

Ah I see. Slightly off topic but one thing I could so is buy my current property under right to buy I suppose, but I'm only 1.5 years into living there and I'm still waiting to see if the Deregulation Bill goes through which would make me eligible in 2016. However anything could happen post election so I'm not banking on it. In the back of my mind I would feel a bit bad about depleting the social housing stock, especially if it ended up in the hands of a buy to let landlord at some point.

Also the council won't let me have a dog even if I owned the lease. I think I could sort out some of the sound problems by putting a door in front of the front door to make a porch, however I doubt the council would let me do it.

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I like the sound of Oswald Street. I used live in Hitlerstrasse once!

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Have you ever lived in a new-build house ;)

My experiences might be poorer than most, but, the small room sizes, bowing walls, lack of sound proofing, quality issues (e.g. window handles falling off, roof slates falling down) mean I'd be unlikely to ever touch a 'mass-market' (e.g. Barratt) new-build property again.

My take on it is that if "schemes" are available and you can take advantage of them then an older property, possibly one that needs a little bit of work, may prove better value and give more location flexibility.

Not least because, as you say, a new home commands a price premium. But as soon as you've bought it, it's second-hand. A bit like cars.

You beat me to it. I was going to reply to the OP that perhaps a more useful question might be "Which/where are the best new builds?"

I think the quality/size of new builds is scandalous.

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Isn't this very much on topic?

Anyway, probably parts of Yorkshire and the North East are the cheapest for new builds. Not sure what Scotland prices are like.

I generally quite like new builds but have seen some recently that had very oddly shaped rooms. I know people sometimes knock simple square and rectangular rooms but at least they're flexible.

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When we lived in a terraced new build, the sound proofing was so poor that when the neighbour's phone rang you got up to answer it.

They were always having rows, and you could hear every single word without even trying.

We did "get them back" by emulating the penguin from Wallace and Gromit, by leaving a Kylie CD playing on repeat at maximum volume while we went out for a few hours.

That was childish and I'm not proud of it (made the point, though) - the other issue was parking. Parking was at such a premium if you parked with any part of your car overlapping the next space by even a few inches, this would result in a knock at the door.

Just my experience - that was a "high density development" (Church Langley, Harlow = Hell on Earth) - there will be good new builds, and bad old-builds.

Is there a new build garage out there that isn't used as an extra store room? Can you actually open a car door in a single garage, and not have to get out of the sunroof?

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County Durham is the cheapest I can find, atm.

£122k or £123k for a 3bed det. http://www.gleeson-homes.co.uk/new-homes/north-east/shieldrow-park/3-bedroom-new-home/plot-9

http://www.gleeson-homes.co.uk/new-homes/county-durham/shieldrow-park/3-bedroom-new-home/plot-16

£147 for a 4bed http://www.gleeson-homes.co.uk/new-homes/north-east/shieldrow-park/4-bedroom-new-home/plot-14

They were doing similar 3bed detached type places in Corby, Northants for £105-120k or £145k for 4beds about 2 years ago.

As previous posters have said, given soundproofing in new builds, it seems pointless to buy one that isnt detached.

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Unfortunately number of rooms seems to be about the only pricing criteria, things like build quality and room size don't come into it so just about all new builds are grossly overpriced for what they are. I'd avoid unless you've no other practical choice. If they were priced accordingly they'd fill a useful niche, as it is they're even more a rip-off than the rest of the housing market.

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.....lots of studio flats iro £50k to £60k....aimed at the BTL market to rent to students...you could buy and rent out the sofa. ;)

http://www.zoopla.co.uk/new-homes/property/england/?include_retirement_homes=true&price_max=100000&q=england&new_homes=only&include_shared_ownership=true&search_source=refine&radius=0&include_sold=true&pn=2

Edited by winkie

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Where I am the new builds are priced at the market rates, so that is £280k for a 2 bed Taylor Wimpey terrace with one allocated roadside parking space - and they're the 'affordable houses'

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Where I am the new builds are priced at the market rates, so that is £280k for a 2 bed Taylor Wimpey terrace with one allocated roadside parking space - and they're the 'affordable houses'

That sounds steep...is it on a real road or on an estate of lots of similar?......we do have new builds but are on the whole infill one off private builds....all sorts of shapes, sizes and spec.....some look ultra modern with lots of windows whilst others are more traditional looking....a right patchwork. ;)

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That sounds steep...is it on a real road or on an estate of lots of similar?......we do have new builds but are on the whole infill one off private builds....all sorts of shapes, sizes and spec.....some look ultra modern with lots of windows whilst others are more traditional looking....a right patchwork. ;)

Newbuild on small-ish estate where you wouldn't even want to rent a property.

Edited by LiveinHope

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Up north is the cheapest.

Disagree about the sound insulation qualities of new builds. They are much better than older houses. For example a party wall in an old house would be 215mm of brickwork and no cavity, in a bew build it would be 100mm blockwork/85mm cavity/100mm blockwork.

Sound has difficulty passing through air, hence the cavity.

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Is there a new build garage out there that isn't used as an extra store room? Can you actually open a car door in a single garage, and not have to get out of the sunroof?

You could buy a convertible, and get out through the roof! The current "Golf" is nearly a foot wider than the original one!

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Up north is the cheapest.

Disagree about the sound insulation qualities of new builds. They are much better than older houses. For example a party wall in an old house would be 215mm of brickwork and no cavity, in a bew build it would be 100mm blockwork/85mm cavity/100mm blockwork.

Sound has difficulty passing through air, hence the cavity.

Agreed, didn't know there was a cavity in blockwork party walls though. We lived in a 1999 blockwork end terrace and we barely heard the neighbours, the odd muffled noise if they were arguing. Now in a Victorian house with 215mm brick party wall, we can hear the neighbours talking clearly and when they walk around upstairs it sounds like we've got a ghost upstairs in our house stomping around.

Some old houses are only one brick thick to the external walls, 4.5" about 115mm then, asssume party walls are the same thickness I can't imagine how noisy that would be!

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I live in a 100 year old block, and I can hear my neighbour yawning. And farting.

I know what you mean. I can hear my upstairs neighbour pissing in the toilet even though I'm two rooms away. Worse still, I get woken up by them shagging at 4am in the morning.

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I'm currently living in a 1950s council flat, second floor, so have people above and below me. The flat is relatively spacious with a nice hallway, however, there is a huge problem with noise. I can pretty much hear what my upstairs neighbours are saying and I get woken up by people talking along the stairwell in the morning. I can sit in my living room about 5 metres away from the front door, with the living room door shut and it feels like the people in the stairwell are talking in the room, it's that loud.

Hmmm, interesting! I grew up in a 1950s ex-council house. These were solidly built homes. Never heard a peep from the ajoining neighbour.

I eventually 'bought' an ex-council flat built in 1960 (1st/top floor). Again, pretty solid with concrete floors. Admittedly I could hear the neighbours downstairs but they were arguing a fair bit. I could have done better with soundproofing in using best quality underlay & carpets.

Trouble with the communal areas in many blocks of council flats are that they are pretty basic with concrete floors and bare brick so noise and peoples' voices do reverberate quite badly.

I still think these 1950s-60s ex-council homes are a better bet than new builds. New builds in my area almost always seem to depreciate in asking prices when sold on.

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