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bendy

Food Banks - Why In Date Only?

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Why do food banks only accept in date food?

Not that I've any plans to give any of my bunker stash away but surely accepting up to x months/years would be better, no?

I assume it's tied in with legals/H&S and just good old capitalism in general, else TPTB couldn't laugh at the starving peasants.

:huh:

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I wonder if a loop hole could be exploited . Freeze the food the day before expiry, most freezable food says its ok for 30 days after freezing ( in reality its many times this, but flavour may be impaired slightly )

Frozen food isn't usually taken, neither is fresh stuff, unless you can get rid of it immediately...

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Eating value food is nothing to be snobby about.

If you only have a small amount to send then you need to get as many calories for your money as possible.

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They will be insisting it is labelled 'ideal for food banks' next ...

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I feel really tempted to buy some caviar for a food bank.

Oh wait... poor people only deserve value food. Give them something better and they will get uppity.

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political correctness plus health and safety. I imagine it is considered offensive to think that poor people should eat out of date food.

Funnily enough, there has been a lot of talk here recently about ignoring the sell by date on food. I don't know if it is specifically german, or a european initiative, but it seems someone wants to reduce food wastage.

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The problem is that this area is mired in complexity. Best before means just that i.e. you can still eat it after that date, but how long after depends on the food. A can of beans may be OK a year later, and I've eaten dried pulses, jam and pasta a couple of years past their best before dates.

Use by, however, is rather firmer. It's illegal to sell food past it's use by date because it's more likely to be dangerous.

Then there's the legal liability. The food may be OK, but if someone gets a stomach upset - they are more likely to blame the out of date food.

It's simpler to ask for in date food - and it's not like there's a shortage of it. The supermarkets are full of the stuff. Plus those of us willing to take the risk get a load of out of date bargains.

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I have some very old dried beans, but I am sure you did not want to know that!

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The problem is that this area is mired in complexity. Best before means just that i.e. you can still eat it after that date, but how long after depends on the food. A can of beans may be OK a year later, and I've eaten dried pulses, jam and pasta a couple of years past their best before dates.

Use by, however, is rather firmer. It's illegal to sell food past it's use by date because it's more likely to be dangerous.

Then there's the legal liability. The food may be OK, but if someone gets a stomach upset - they are more likely to blame the out of date food.

It's simpler to ask for in date food - and it's not like there's a shortage of it. The supermarkets are full of the stuff. Plus those of us willing to take the risk get a load of out of date bargains.

It's not that complex though is it. But half the country probably still don't know the difference between 'Use by' and 'best before', even though it's been in use for decades.

There must be a hell of a load of food go to waste because people are chucking items that have gone a few days over the 'best before' date. Common sense can be used, i.e. does it look alright/smell ok?

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It's not that complex though is it. But half the country probably still don't know the difference between 'Use by' and 'best before', even though it's been in use for decades.

There must be a hell of a load of food go to waste because people are chucking items that have gone a few days over the 'best before' date. Common sense can be used, i.e. does it look alright/smell ok?

Indeed, and despite a number of initiatives over the years to education people about the difference "half the country" still doesn't get the subtleties. Add in Sell By dates as well - and I think your figure might even be optimistic. Add in knowing how safe particular foods are post these dates - and it's no surprise that even some of the fairly intelligent people I know, just think "out of date? lob it in the bin". It saves you having to give it any more thought, and hopefully helps avoid a tummy bug.

If you are a food bank, it's obvious that you simply aren't going to take the risk of one of your volunteers/staff getting mixed up, or one of your customers thinking you are trying to poison them by giving them a month out of date packet of crisps (perfectly fine IME) and it blowing up in the media.

I am totally with you on common sense. I have any number of veggies and other stuff in the fridge which is a few days/week out of date as well as a few items in the larder which are past their best before too. Almost none of them will get wasted - and I'm a regular at the discounted food sections at my local supermarket too so I can stock up on fresh produce for the week.

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approvedfood.co.uk specialised in out-of-date food stuff. That's if you can stomach the delivery costs.

Quite. Why I asked TBH. I placed my first order with them the other day after totting up whether 40 bags of out-of-date McCoys King Prawn was worth it at 5 for a quid compared to 2 for a quid at the local shop. I threw a few more bits and pieces in (including a HUGE box of chocs) and it certainly made sense.

So much sense that I though it'd surely be better if food banks took cash donations and then spent them at places like that.

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