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Vice.com - The Generation Who Have No Real Incentive To Grow Up

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...This is my generation; the generation who have no real incentive to grow up. No kids to feel guilty about, no mortgages to pay off, decent enough healthcare to keep them alive, jobs that let them ​scrape the money they need to feed, house and wash themselves, and only the screams of their bosses and the worried phone calls of their families to tear them away from the noble pursuit of getting on one. An army of first-world wasters trapped in an Escher maze of immaturity.

A friend of mine told me recently that he'd read it would be impossible to make Big now, because 30-year-olds still do the kind of things teenagers do. It wouldn't be funny or shocking any more to see a grown man buying a pinball table or wearing jeans to the office. It probably wouldn't work even if he were 40 in it.

...even if you're the same age and are way more responsible, this pattern is something you'll see in every town and city in the country. In my mind there is little doubt that this massive, generational detachment from maturity is a nationwide problem, and probably the narrative that will come to define us when they begin to write our stories. It'll be told as the story of how the traditional routes out of our youth – babies, houses, a job worth breaking your back for – were all but sealed off, trapping us into what can only be described as a state of perpetual teenhood.

http://www.vice.com/en_uk/read/when-does-the-party-stop

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I see they same where I live. Many of the lads I play cricket with are in their 20's/early 30's. They are predominantly builders, plumbers, electricians etc. and I can't fault their work ethic.

As house prices/rents are so high (2 bedroom house c.£200k) they all live at home and spend most of their free time at the pub. They see owning a house as unattainable (probably right given that they are looking at c.10x income for a starter home) and hence see no point in saving for a deposit.

They are the victims of HPI, trapped in perpetual late adolescence.

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Teenagers have no assets and no realistic prospect of acquiring assets, so they live for the moment and don't take on responsibilities that require assets.

Now that it is impossible for many people in their 20s and 30s to accumulate assets they have started to behave that way too.

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I'd be far more of a hedonist if I could hack the hangovers these days.

I think I'm doing it wrong.

Great post BTW, and Exiled Canadians post rings true.

Life has not turned out how I thought it would as I grew up, and now I'm here, I'm not sure I want it anyway.

Edited by chronyx

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The thing is as far as I can see the ones who have the good careers and houses are still choosing the same lifestyle. I'm 35 now and I'd say 50% of friends own their own houses (I'm t'up north) but only 10% have had kids or got married. I've generally thought the bigger reason we are choosing to not adopt our parents lifestyle is that they were the first generation on mass to get divorced. Couples "staying together for the kids" who hate each other or the financial and emotional hit when it does end hasn't really sold it to us.

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With cash in the bank thanks in part to saving my own cash and part to the grandparents demise (of course I'd have loved to have them still around), and a job in which i love and I'm very much in demand at the moment, life is good and the feeling of being able to quit and just go on a jolly whenever I feel like it is just so incredibly liberating.

I've explained to the girlfriend how I never want to get married and that's not a reflection on her but following on from above. I thrive on freedom, it let's you take risks like saying to your boss, here's my notice, I haven't got anything lined up but if I do I really don't feel like waiting 3 months to leave.

It's so very liberating, even if you don't realise it. and while I'm sure the majority want to move out of their parents house and start a family, if a target is unachievable then there are far more things to do with your life than worry about it.

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What a load of condescending bull. I reject the idea of getting into massive debt to pay for boomer pensions but that doesn't mean I'm a degenerate p***head covered in tattoos.

I do rather fancy a pinball table though.

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Interestingly the vicecom article doesn't mention the way the relationships between males and females have changed since "the parents" days (30 + years ago for some) and the apparent increasing independence of females. It might have been interesting enough to rate a mention.

Of course cost of housing is a significant factor in lifestyles.

Edited by billybong

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With cash in the bank thanks in part to saving my own cash and part to the grandparents demise (of course I'd have loved to have them still around), and a job in which i love and I'm very much in demand at the moment, life is good and the feeling of being able to quit and just go on a jolly whenever I feel like it is just so incredibly liberating.

I've explained to the girlfriend how I never want to get married and that's not a reflection on her but following on from above. I thrive on freedom, it let's you take risks like saying to your boss, here's my notice, I haven't got anything lined up but if I do I really don't feel like waiting 3 months to leave.

It's so very liberating, even if you don't realise it. and while I'm sure the majority want to move out of their parents house and start a family, if a target is unachievable then there are far more things to do with your life than worry about it.

do you know me ? very similar apart from the job and girlfriend part :lol:

Edited by longgone

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Interestingly the vicecom article doesn't mention the way the relationships between males and females have changed since "the parents" days (30 + years ago for some) and the apparent increasing independence of females. It might have been interesting enough to rate a mention.

Of course cost of housing is a significant factor in lifestyles.

Indeed.

Frankly, i'm scared, legally, financially, of ever getting too involved with a woman.

If she decides she prefers someone else a few years down the line, you may as well just walk away from the proceeds of decades of hard work.

Housing affordability maybe a biggie, but the war on men hasn't helped.

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Guest Jemmy Button

A good article and interesting topic. The other aspect of all this is that those with 'no incentive to grow up' have probably assumed that one day, in the not too distant future, they will inherit a house with a gargantuan price tag and they will be rich beyond their means! They will probably be in their 80's by then, however.

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Hang on a minute! :blink:

You are falling into the 'if you don't have a mortgage then you are a looser' mantra.

Most 50/60 year olds I know were/are out on the piss every w/end, the fact that they could also buy a house and have kids while doing it. Is just another smack in the face for the younger generation.

He's just saying that he does what everybody has always done, but has bugger all to show for it!

Is this the HPC forum? :lol: Hello?

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I couldn't comment on how young people in India or China feel.

I think the point is that for a hard working person on their late 20's/early 30's with a trade the prospect of buying a house is out of reach in many parts of the country. This is a change in the situation when compared with that faced by me (and I'd wager many people on this forum) when we were a similar age.

I have two main concerns over this:

1. Is it fair for opportunities that the country afforded me to be denied to those born 20 years later? What is the impact on social mobility if only those with very well off parents are able to achieve the independence and security that owning your own home allows?

2. What will be the likely impact on society over the next 20 years if this situation persists? Given the Ponzi nature of UK state pension funding, and increasing life expectancies in retirement, a fall in the domestic birth rate will, absent immigration, have a significant impact upon the government finances and also the nature of our society.

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Hang on a minute! :blink:

You are falling into the 'if you don't have a mortgage then you are a looser' mantra.

Most 50/60 year olds I know were/are out on the piss every w/end, the fact that they could also buy a house and have kids while doing it. Is just another smack in the face for the younger generation.

He's just saying that he does what everybody has always done, but has bugger all to show for it!

Is this the HPC forum? :lol: Hello?

You are 100% correct Sir

We were out down the pub 2/3 times a week plus a club at the weekend.We thought nothing at buying rounds. Several rounds. (1980's)

And we all had our own houses

Edited by aSecureTenant

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I couldn't comment on how young people in India or China feel.

I think the point is that for a hard working person on their late 20's/early 30's with a trade the prospect of buying a house is out of reach in many parts of the country. This is a change in the situation when compared with that faced by me (and I'd wager many people on this forum) when we were a similar age.

I have two main concerns over this:

1. Is it fair for opportunities that the country afforded me to be denied to those born 20 years later? What is the impact on social mobility if only those with very well off parents are able to achieve the independence and security that owning your own home allows?

2. What will be the likely impact on society over the next 20 years if this situation persists? Given the Ponzi nature of UK state pension funding, and increasing life expectancies in retirement, a fall in the domestic birth rate will, absent immigration, have a significant impact upon the government finances and also the nature of our society.

Why do you think opportunities that previous generations had are not available to future generations and what do you think needs to change for that to be reversed?

My point about young people in India and China is that they probably do not have the same feelings of hopelessness as young people in the UK probably because they know what true hopelessness really means.

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This article is ********. The reason they have no incentive to grow up is simply because they have everything given to them.

I know Chinese and Indians who grew up absolutely piss poor, beyond the imaginations of anyone in the UK of the same generation and they grew up pretty quickly.

One Chinese guy in particular now has multiple houses in the UK having come from literally zero. He's batshit mind, but that doesn't detract from the point. The reason they haven't grown up is because they're not hungry. Literally or metaphorically. It's sad really.

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Nice article. If there's no inventive to grow up, no opportunity, no payoff, why bother?

Quite....otherwise SMART and achievable..... No hope, no hope in trying.

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Previous post war generations had:

1. The right to a free university education if they had the pre-requisite academic ability with a grant toward their living costs. Now we saddle them with c.£50k of debt.

2. The expectation that if they were able to earn something around the average wage in the UK they would be able to afford their own house.

How would I change this:

1. Free university education and grant funding for the top 5% of A level students in the state sector - paid for by the removal of the principal private residence exemption from CGT and making winter fuel allowance and other pensioner benefits subject to means testing.

2. Relax planning restrictions to encourage a significant increase in housing supply, remove current government props to the housing market (HTB, FFL).

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Previous post war generations had:

2. The expectation that if they were able to earn something around the average wage in the UK they would be able to afford their own house.

And, more importantly, while owning the house they could support a non-working wife and children without resorting to debt.

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