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VeryMeanReversion

Field To Dwelling

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I've just had a letter from the council planners about a neighbour getting planning permission. The story goes like this (call them Bob). I though it would be a good example of how to get a house without paying residential plot prices.

1. Bob has house and 15+ acres

2. Bob rents out land for horses

3. Bob calls it a stud

4. Bob erects an outbuilding (not much more than a large wooden shed)

5. Bob goes broke

6. Bob sells house but not the shed + land.

7. Bob moves into shed

8. Bob refurbs shed, lives in it.

9. Council find out, start saying that they cant live there. Legal letters go back and forth.

10. Bob just stays there, around 3 years would be my guess

11. Bob applies for restrospective planning, claiming it is a rural business and must live on site.

12. Bob gets planning permission for shed to be a legal dwelling

My understanding of the planning permission involving residential use of agricultural buildings meant that being on-site for horses was not a 24hr, 365 day requirement. (The previous dodge was Llamas but horses are easier to keep)

However, the permission has now been granted.

So all you need to do is buy a few acres and then build a nice stable. Divide up the land and rent out for livery. Since you have very few costs, it will be profitable (key requirement, keep accounts). Live on site without permission and wait it out => Legal.

This has turned a field worth around £300K into a building plot with £1m+.

I have a friend that is now looking at doing this as a divorce means they will have to sell their house soon. The can afford field+stable and are experience with horses to run a livery but don't have enough to buy a house.

It is yet another example I have learned that playing the planning game is far more profitable (and tax-free) than working for a living (punitive taxes).

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Can be a very long haul - and with very little certainty the decision will go your way at the end. Most planning authorities do scrutinise these sort of applications to test for it being a genuine business and a genuine need for 24/7 presence. IME a couple of horses won't cut it.

And, if you do win, you do have to run a business there which rather means you need to like smelly beasts. But, if you've got this far, you probably do!

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Wasn't there a grand designs where the owner was able to put up a permanent structure because he was a woodsman and 'maintained the wood' (chopped and felled tree's, sold the wood, made stuff out of wood, replanted it).

Woodland would be a better bet IMO. Not least more hidden from nosy parkers

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Wasn't there a grand designs where the owner was able to put up a permanent structure because he was a woodsman and 'maintained the wood' (chopped and felled tree's, sold the wood, made stuff out of wood, replanted it).

Woodland would be a better bet IMO. Not least more hidden from nosy parkers

yes ,

http://www.ben-law.co.uk/

but hardly anyone would be able to get in on a gig like that. He could not sell it, only hand it down to his kids IIRC

Edited by Saving For a Space Ship

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I was planning on following the field to farm method, then thought bugger it I will just move to Ireland. I soon discovered that I am not so keen in the isolated wilderness.

Pelople in the UK think living in the coutryside is something special because tehy are prohibited from doing so. I actual fact it's not as great as it's cracked up to be, but still much better than 20 years ago with mobile broadband, cheap cars etc.

Edited by Wurzel Of Highbridge

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Varies from council to council, but generally the planners will require accounts showing the farming enterprise to making an income the applicant can live off. Battery hen farming might be workable if you don't have much acreage and don't have a problem with the ethics. It takes knowledge, time, capital and land to be able to make £15 / £20k a year from grazing or arable farming.
Even when all that is done, you are still left with a house with an agricultural tie, which can be a tricky problem.

Pelople in the UK think living in the coutryside is something special because tehy are prohibited from doing so. I actual fact it's not as great as it's cracked up to be, but still much better than 20 years ago with mobile broadband, cheap cars etc.

+1 I think the majority would prefer a well built home (on a decent size plot if they wanted a garden / out buildings etc) within a non intrusive community. Sadly insane planning permission and land costs make this an unobtainable dream for the majority.

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