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justthisbloke

My Mid Life Crisis: Quitting Job & Moving To The Countryside

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I suppose buying a house is cheaper than divorce and running off with a barmaid. But what I'm doing doesn't half feel like a dangerous mid-life crisis to me.

Subject to survey, it's a done deal and next summer will see me jobless and leaning on a gate chewing a straw.

Three decades of miserlyness might be paying off.

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I suppose buying a house is cheaper than divorce and running off with a barmaid. But what I'm doing doesn't half feel like a dangerous mid-life crisis to me.

Subject to survey, it's a done deal and next summer will see me jobless and leaning on a gate chewing a straw.

Three decades of miserlyness might be paying off.

Best of luck. You won't regret it.

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I suppose buying a house is cheaper than divorce and running off with a barmaid. But what I'm doing doesn't half feel like a dangerous mid-life crisis to me.

Subject to survey, it's a done deal and next summer will see me jobless and leaning on a gate chewing a straw.

Three decades of miserlyness might be paying off.

If you'd like to employ a mad hermit living on your estate to pull in the tourists, I am prepared to consider such a position...

;)

Seriously, best of luck with your new lifestyle.

XYY

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Chewing on a straw is not a good idea.

My uncle did that, got an infection which nearly killed him. (from rats apparently)

We will warn you of other dangers as we think of them.

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I suppose buying a house is cheaper than divorce and running off with a barmaid. But what I'm doing doesn't half feel like a dangerous mid-life crisis to me.

Subject to survey, it's a done deal and next summer will see me jobless and leaning on a gate chewing a straw.

Three decades of miserlyness might be paying off.

Might be more sensible to buy a house in the countryside. :rolleyes:

Have you been reading Austin's recommended read "The quest of the simple life"?

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I suppose buying a house is cheaper than divorce and running off with a barmaid. But what I'm doing doesn't half feel like a dangerous mid-life crisis to me.

Subject to survey, it's a done deal and next summer will see me jobless and leaning on a gate chewing a straw.

Three decades of miserlyness might be paying off.

From my experience and anecdotal stuff, you will be better off than you think. You will start to wonder why you didn't do this earlier.

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Moving to the countryside is not so bad. Your mid-life crisis could involve an operation, wearing high heels and calling yourself Shirley from now on.

And don't call me Shirley!

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Go for it, it's a much better place to live for most people. Crowded city conditions are very unnatural, just people are so used to them that they don't even realise it (and are possibly too used to the constant distractions, rather like children who have been brought up constantly stimulated and are left with a five second attention span). If you aren't in an impatient rush, can make a living, and can tell the difference between distractions that keep you from being unhappy and the real things that make you happy it'll probably do you a lot of good. I'd have gone back ages ago if I'd worked out a way of making a living.

Just a pity that there are far too many people in the country for most of us to be able to have such a decent life, and that everything is too centralised and large scale for it to be practical.

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And soon you will be sick of being stuck behind a tractor, and spending your summers visiting County Shows with marquees full of remedial woodwork and cushions embroidered with cocker spaniels.

Ha!....not so bad, life is what you make it....some days can walk for miles and not meet another person or you can pro actively get involved....plenty to do andlots of new and different projects to put excess energies into.....behind the scenes all is not dull and boring....you will never find out until you enter the door.....best of luck.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JpbZNH8r8qk

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Be careful, sound like the place is teeming with them naturists ...

Ha!....not so bad, life is what you make it....some days can walk for miles and not meet another person or you can pro actively get involved....plenty to do andlots of new and different projects to put excess energies into.....behind the scenes all is not dull and boring....you will never find out until you enter the door.....best of luck.

"There are a wide range of naturist venues across the UK including members' clubs, regular swims and beaches: you can find out more information about the types of places available on our main activities page. In addition to the places listed below there are thousands of places in the countryside, especially in mountainous and remote coastal areas where naturism is practised. Skinny-dipping and naked sun-bathing are traditional at mountain lakes and streams and at remote beaches, and walking naked is practised by a surprising number of people. The only guide you need to find these spots is a good map and a sense of adventure.

http://www.bn.org.uk/activities/placestogo.php

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Thanks, guys! I've been getting a bit nervous so needed a boost.

Not that it's a leap totally into the unknown. A return to where a grew up and where most of my family still live.

But I've been in a rut for years now - with every passing day making it harder to get out of. Comforts of a well paid job and the familiarity of having been in the same place for so long. Mrs JTB says the fact I am feeling fear of change shows that we need to make the change.

When she pushes for what I'm actually afraid of, the best I can come up with is that it'll be a very long walk to the pub.

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And soon you will be sick of being stuck behind a tractor, and spending your summers visiting County Shows with marquees full of remedial woodwork and cushions embroidered with cocker spaniels.

Get a bicycle and join the local cycling club. Should be some regular club rides to enjoy the countryside and put some routine into the week.

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If it doesn't seem to be going well at first make sure that you've at least had enough time to settle in so that isn't just the change that's the problem. Adjustments even for something a lot better can sometimes be difficult to begin with.

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Thanks, guys! I've been getting a bit nervous so needed a boost.

Not that it's a leap totally into the unknown. A return to where a grew up and where most of my family still live.

But I've been in a rut for years now - with every passing day making it harder to get out of. Comforts of a well paid job and the familiarity of having been in the same place for so long. Mrs JTB says the fact I am feeling fear of change shows that we need to make the change.

When she pushes for what I'm actually afraid of, the best I can come up with is that it'll be a very long walk to the pub.

Trite though it is, the biggest fear is fear itself. When I look back at some of the leaps of faith I've taken or those major changes that have been forced on me I can actually see that it was for the best. Besides, anyone can talk about doing stuff, only a few go ahead and do it.

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Thanks, guys! I've been getting a bit nervous so needed a boost.

Not that it's a leap totally into the unknown. A return to where a grew up and where most of my family still live.

But I've been in a rut for years now - with every passing day making it harder to get out of. Comforts of a well paid job and the familiarity of having been in the same place for so long. Mrs JTB says the fact I am feeling fear of change shows that we need to make the change.

When she pushes for what I'm actually afraid of, the best I can come up with is that it'll be a very long walk to the pub.

I met my mid-life crisis half way. Moved to the country, but couldn't quite bring myself to quit work. Believe it or not, I enjoy it too much!

Biggest surprise to me was how much effort it is to keep a 200+ year old farmhouse in fine fettle, although we did move from a modern (and factored!) city centre flat.

Oh, and the lack of noise..... bliss!

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Definitely true about the noise. I really appreciate the lack of it when I go back to visit my parents, I can sleep with the window open (unless the bloody owls get too noisy). Just the constant background of traffic throughout the night here is too much for me, even though I'm not that close to any main roads. Proper darkness is good too for sleeping, and there's something very pleasant about the smell of coal smoke at this time of year (although that being a rural thing is relatively modern of course, don't have to go back too far when it would've been a horrible choking smog of the stuff in cities).

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I moved back to countryside a couple of years ago. Not a day goes by where I don't count my blessings - even when it's tossing down with rain and blowing a hurricane. It's quiet, incredibly quiet - but I love it.

I managed to take my job with me. Perhaps a possiblity for you, JTB?

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If it doesn't seem to be going well at first make sure that you've at least had enough time to settle in so that isn't just the change that's the problem. Adjustments even for something a lot better can sometimes be difficult to begin with.

Agreed....at first it may seem like a long holiday, also it takes a bit of time to find your way so to speak and for others to get to know, trust and accept you, it helps if you can put yourself out there and get to know others, many are incomers themselves, so many new and interesting people from all over.....completely different to living in the city where everyone you pass is a stranger on a mission, have got to get used to the slower pace of life where nothing is that urgent, having time to think, read, learn.....I think it must help with wellbeing, being so much closer to nature, fresh air, the land, the seasons and as already said the darkness, stars and the quiet, like not hearing the sound of so many emergency vehicles sirens and traffic all around, nice to be able park anywhere, no yellow lines....nice to walk over land using the right of and bridle ways.

As the UK is only a small island a large city is not that far away and there is always a place to stay....because we have so much new technology coming on board, nobody is that far away from anybody....best of all worlds.

Things are always changing no one place means a place for life, people and places move on. ;)

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