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Nhs Needs Emergency £1.5Bn Christmas Bailout

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The Government has said that it has already increased NHS funding by about £5billion. The Tories have promised to protect funding for NHS but not committed to increases beyond inflation.

They should also be taking population increases & decreases into account.

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Why can't all the NHS staff sell their spare 2 year old iPhones and old iPads on the internet which they've replaced with the latest shiny, and donate the proceeds

That should cover it

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Time to cut winter fuel allowance for those living in Spain etc. and means test pensions.

Better still do away with state pensions altogether. Refund the contributions made over a working life and call it quits!

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The NHS has a worse case of too big to fail than the banks. And they know it. Hence, spend without regard to anyone's budget and present an ultimatum to the taxpayer: bailout or no NHS.

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The problem is such a vague headline misses the most important point, which is that not every part of the NHS is having difficulties.

There is a huge variability in financial soundness. Some trusts are in a terrible state, others are growing rapidly, with significant cash surpluses which can be used to provide new services or improve existing services.

I've seen all sorts of suicidal management at various times - e.g. purchase of very expensive capital equipment (e.g. MRI scanner) which is only operated 9-5 M-F for staffing reasons, while outsourcing MRI scanning to private contractors, because demand is exceeding supply; daylight robbery PFI contracts; overly aggressive management who erode morale to the point that staff start leaving, resulting in a downward spiral maintained by agency staff on astronomical hourly rates, etc.

Bailouts are not the answer. The bad management needs to be culled. If it needs reorganisation of services to more efficient trusts, then is that a bad thing?

Edited by ChumpusRex

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It's all engineered on purpose. The recent health act replaced half a dozen or so health authorities with nearly 300 local commissioning groups. Each group has a board of directors and some GPs giving advice (in return for even more cash). So the bureaucracy has been multiplied many times over and put into place a system of fine when trusts can't perform, mainly due to lack of cash. This forces a never ending spiral of poor performance so they can eventually justify privatisation. On top of this if organisations collaborate to save cost they are stopped under sham anti competition rules.

There are some trusts that have less than half a day's liquidity in the coffers.

They won't be open about all this though because it's all about imposing ideology.

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The problem is such a vague headline misses the most important point, which is that not every part of the NHS is having difficulties.

There is a huge variability in financial soundness. Some trusts are in a terrible state, others are growing rapidly, with significant cash surpluses which can be used to provide new services or improve existing services.

I've seen all sorts of suicidal management at various times - e.g. purchase of very expensive capital equipment (e.g. MRI scanner) which is only operated 9-5 M-F for staffing reasons, while outsourcing MRI scanning to private contractors, because demand is exceeding supply; daylight robbery PFI contracts; overly aggressive management who erode morale to the point that staff start leaving, resulting in a downward spiral maintained by agency staff on astronomical hourly rates, etc.

Bailouts are not the answer. The bad management needs to be culled. If it needs reorganisation of services to more efficient trusts, then is that a bad thing?

It seems to me that bad management in the NHS is fixed by adding more management, so the bad manager can be managed.

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