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‘Crash For Cash’ Incidents Hit All-Time High, Says Aviva.it's Growth,but Not As We Know It.

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Guardian 6/11/14

'The number of road traffic accidents staged by criminal gangs intent on making money from whiplash compensation has hit an all-time high, according to one of the UK’s biggest insurers.

So far this year the levels of organised fraud are already 21% higher than in the whole of 2013, according to Aviva, with more than 50% of the insurer’s fraudulent motor injury claims being made by organised gangs.

The majority involve “crash for cash” incidents, where fraudsters either deliberately crash two of their own vehicles together in private or brake sharply in front of an innocent driver’s car, causing that driver to go into the back of them. As it is the driver of the car behind that is deemed to be at fault in such collisions, fraudsters attempt to claim large sums in compensation for apparent whiplash caused by that driver. Gangs will target the vehicles most likely to have insurance and drivers least likely to cause a scene – often parents with children in the car or older drivers.

In 2013 a report from the Insurance Fraud Bureau estimated the annual cost of this type of incident to be £392m, adding around £14 to every motor insurance premium.

“Crash for cash is not just a financial problem – it’s a serious social problem. No other form of insurance fraud puts the public at risk of serious injury,” said Tom Gardiner, head of claims fraud for Aviva’s UK and Ireland general insurance business. “Last year Aviva found these accidents increased by 51%, and they are continuing to grow. Part of the growth is coming as fraudsters are moving away from a small number of hot spot locations to a much wider footprint.”

In the past the north-west – particularly Manchester – had been the focal point for the fraudulent claims but partly as a result of the number of successful prosecutions there, fraudsters have now moved on. Birmingham, Luton and north London are at the top of the list, according to Aviva.

Earlier this year the government announced that it will cut the medical assessment fees for people who claim they have suffered whiplash in England and Wales. Charges of up to £700 for an initial medical report will be reduced to £180, the justice secretary, Chris Grayling, said.

The move was part of a series of measures being looked at to reduce the number of fraudulent motor insurance claims. One of the problems with whiplash is that it can be difficult to prove whether someone is suffering from the condition or not. Under new rules insurance companies will also be urged not to accept claims without a doctor’s report showing evidence of an injury.

“Insurers recognise that crash for cash is a serious issue that impacts not just on premiums but also on the safety of innocent motorists,” a spokesman for the Association of British Insurers said. “That is one of the reasons that insurers are investing over £200m in tackling fraud.”'

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They really need to outlaw the selling of data of people who've been in accidents.

We changed our phone number after 2 years+ of being harrassed to make a claim after some **** reversed into us.

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We've covered this before, that there is a distinct preponderance of certain communities undertaking crash for cash

Birmingham, Luton and north London are at the top of the list, according to Aviva.

but of course, anyone that actually published the statistics, or referred to them in a press release, would get screamed at for being raaacist. I wonder how long before I get accused on this thread...

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It all adds to GDP, crime is now an important factor to boosting it and obviously our contribution to the EU.

All growth is good.

From when the left actually had stuff to say that was worth listening to...

... we seemed to have surrendered personal excellence and community values in the mere accumulation of material things. Our Gross National Product, now, is over $800 billion dollars a year, but that Gross National Product - if we judge the United States of America by that - that Gross National Product counts air pollution and cigarette advertising, and ambulances to clear our highways of carnage.

It counts special locks for our doors and the jails for the people who break them. It counts the destruction of the redwood and the loss of our natural wonder in chaotic sprawl.

It counts napalm and counts nuclear warheads and armored cars for the police to fight the riots in our cities. It counts Whitman's rifle and Speck's knife, and the television programs which glorify violence in order to sell toys to our children.

Yet the gross national product does not allow for the health of our children, the quality of their education or the joy of their play. It does not include the beauty of our poetry or the strength of our marriages, the intelligence of our public debate or the integrity of our public officials.

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We've covered this before, that there is a distinct preponderance of certain communities undertaking crash for cash

Birmingham, Luton and north London are at the top of the list, according to Aviva.

but of course, anyone that actually published the statistics, or referred to them in a press release, would get screamed at for being raaacist. I wonder how long before I get accused on this thread...

I thought it was common knowledge that a large proportion of people doing this are of Asian Sub Continent descent. I remember LOL when a crowded (but normally empty) bus in BRUM was involved in this.

I am all for it - it's what the NeoCons call 'trickle down'.

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How do they make all this money?...Ive been initially offered not much more than the expenses Ive incurred...and thats with 6 months of actually being unable to move much.

Sounds like they know how to game the system...which means Doctors and insiders are involved.

I would also add, the orginal claim form was prefilled in with "Whiplash"...not a thing I suffered at all.

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They really need to outlaw the selling of data of people who've been in accidents.

We changed our phone number after 2 years+ of being harrassed to make a claim after some **** reversed into us.

Bombarded with PPI....your accident you had, never had one......all this is encouraging people to lie and cheat, they get away with it and may go on to lie and cheat again....a vicious cycle.....selling peoples details and information should not be allowed, shows how principles and ethics are rapidly changing in this country of ours......commit a crime and get a lesser fine, now that is a lucrative business to be in....

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A friend who is professional HGV has had his lorry fleet fitted with cameras by his employer because of the dubious attempts at causing rear-end collisions. One attempt was on a dual carriageway, but he noticed that the car was full and the rear passengers seemed 'over interested' in what was behind them.

As a motorcyclist, these scams frighten me somewhat - people braking for no obvious reason!

Are 'dashcams' actually useful for prosecuting these idiots? Or do the police shy away from it in order to keep 'communities' calm?

If it shows they braked for no reason then maybe. Of course by then you've given your details to a bunch of mad people.

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Another 'benefit' to living in an over-scaled, multicultural, low trust, modern technological society.

Computer says no, the man in the police uniform says nothing can be done, ho hum.

Dashcams are a technical, reactive solution like condoms are to a culture of rampant sexual hedonism. The individual may be protected but the underlying sociological issues remain. Ten, fifteen, twenty years ago we didn't need dashcams, technology or not (this may be related to there being far fewer lawyers per capita as well as ethnic factors) In a couple of years they will be fitted as factory optional extras like parking sensors and iPod docks.

And we'll call this progress.

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Another 'benefit' to living in an over-scaled, multicultural, low trust, modern technological society.

Computer says no, the man in the police uniform says nothing can be done, ho hum.

Dashcams are a technical, reactive solution like condoms are to a culture of rampant sexual hedonism. The individual may be protected but the underlying sociological issues remain. Ten, fifteen, twenty years ago we didn't need dashcams, technology or not (this may be related to there being far fewer lawyers per capita as well as ethnic factors) In a couple of years they will be fitted as factory optional extras like parking sensors and iPod docks.

And we'll call this progress.

First identifiable offender should have been charged with attempted murder and slammed away.

Problem solved.

But no.

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Reading this post explains something that has happened to me a couple of times - driving along quiet dual carriageway at 60mph. Overtaken by a car that then pulls tight in front. Car in front then rapidly decelerates to c. 30mph (using gears, or brake lights bust as no visible warning).

Having read this thread I assume that if I hadn't been alert enough to either reduce my speed similarly, or pull out to re-overtake them, they would have slammed the brakes on.

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Of course the insurance companies could choose to investigate the details of the people involved- it would probably not be too hard to work out who was a serial whiplash victim- but this would cost more than the fake claims I guess so they let it slide.

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‘Crash For Cash’ Incidents Hit All-Time High, Says Aviva.it's Growth,but Not As We Know It.

- It could be any reason. Basically, we need to put up premiums.

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Another 'benefit' to living in an over-scaled, multicultural, low trust, modern technological society.

Computer says no, the man in the police uniform says nothing can be done, ho hum.

Dashcams are a technical, reactive solution like condoms are to a culture of rampant sexual hedonism. The individual may be protected but the underlying sociological issues remain. Ten, fifteen, twenty years ago we didn't need dashcams, technology or not (this may be related to there being far fewer lawyers per capita as well as ethnic factors) In a couple of years they will be fitted as factory optional extras like parking sensors and iPod docks.

And we'll call this progress.

Dash cams have always been handy as additional evidence.

Its just that today, they are relatively cheap and dont need a full recording suite in the boot.

Accidents have always happened.

Saying that, YOUR camera is subject to data protection laws, and Identifying people not actually involved in the crime is against the civil law.

Section 5.2 of the Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) Technical Guidance document provides an explanation of what constitutes personal data. Although written in the context of photographs, it would also apply to video recordings.

The guidance makes clear that the same piece of data may be personal data in one party’s hands while it may not be personal data in another party’s hands. The ICO provides the example of a photograph of New Year celebrations taken by a photo journalist and compares this with an amost identical image taken by police to identify possible troublemakers. The data in the electronic image taken by the journalist is unlikely to contain personal data about individuals in the crowd as it is not being processed to learn anything about an identifiable individual while in the hands of the police a similar photograph can contain personal data. Similar to the image taken by the photo journalist, where a college or university takes video footage in Trafalgar Square, for example as part of a film about or set in London, which happens to capture passers by, the video footage is unlikely to contain personal data about these individuals. Such individuals are not the focus of the film nor is the film intended to convey anything about the individuals concerned.

Edited by Bloo Loo

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Aviva’s (LSE: AV) recovery over the past few years has been impressive. Indeed, after reporting a loss of 11.2p per share during 2012, the company’s profit is expected to jump this year, with City analysts predicting earnings per share of 47.9p for 2014, followed by earnings per share of 50.9p during 2015.


What’s more, Aviva’s recovery has reached the stage where the group is now searching for opportunities to boost growth. One of the regions where Aviva has been traditionally under-represented is Asia.


For example, the company has £250bn in assets spread across 15 countries but only a single-digit percentage of these assets is located within Asia. Specifically, within Asia the firm has £4.1bn in assets under management.


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I thought the best way of doing this was to stop on a motorway on-ramp and reverse backwards at high speed into the victim. Maybe these new "cash for crash" people are amateurs?

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From when the left actually had stuff to say that was worth listening to...

... we seemed to have surrendered personal excellence and community values in the mere accumulation of material things. Our Gross National Product, now, is over $800 billion dollars a year, but that Gross National Product - if we judge the United States of America by that - that Gross National Product counts air pollution and cigarette advertising, and ambulances to clear our highways of carnage.

It counts special locks for our doors and the jails for the people who break them. It counts the destruction of the redwood and the loss of our natural wonder in chaotic sprawl.

It counts napalm and counts nuclear warheads and armored cars for the police to fight the riots in our cities. It counts Whitman's rifle and Speck's knife, and the television programs which glorify violence in order to sell toys to our children.

Yet the gross national product does not allow for the health of our children, the quality of their education or the joy of their play. It does not include the beauty of our poetry or the strength of our marriages, the intelligence of our public debate or the integrity of our public officials.

There's an interesting rebuttal to this Kennedy quote in the Undercover Economist Strikes Back. Basically, it goes like this. If you turn it on its head it's basically saying that because we now have a bunch of nerds measuring GNP that we've lost interest in the other things that make life worth while - and that, of course, no politician is just interested in GNP (and in any case, sales of poetry count to GNP).

Personally, I wasn't wholly convinced by what the author's argument.

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There's an interesting rebuttal to this Kennedy quote in the Undercover Economist Strikes Back. Basically, it goes like this. If you turn it on its head it's basically saying that because we now have a bunch of nerds measuring GNP that we've lost interest in the other things that make life worth while - and that, of course, no politician is just interested in GNP (and in any case, sales of poetry count to GNP).

Personally, I wasn't wholly convinced by what the author's argument.

Output is always going to be an odd thing to measure. Jingoistic yanks often remark about how much higher US per capita GDP is than ours...but how much of that is due to massive health and military spending which is of dubious value.

And in reverse, how much of our GDP is for substandard housing that is still supposedly worth huge sums...despite sometimes resembling a central american squat.

I dont know what the answer is. My own choice would be a simple employment vs purchasing power ratio.

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They really need to outlaw the selling of data of people who've been in accidents.

We changed our phone number after 2 years+ of being harrassed to make a claim after some **** reversed into us.

Too late for you now, but I hope you've learned a very important lesson: NEVER give out your landline number to ANY company.

The only company that has my landline number is my telephone provider.

Everyone else gets either my work number or my mobile, where I run a free app called Mr Number to dump the junk calls with the phone barely even ringing.

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