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Rolls-Royce To Cut 2,600 Jobs

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Don't worry, ASDA, Burger King and KFC will pick up the slack.

Engineers, serving the nation.

Young people really will start leaving the UK in their droves soon..

Where will their ponzi/pyramid perpetual growth model be then ?

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Don't worry, ASDA, Burger King and KFC will pick up the slack.

But my step son is going off to university for three year in the hope of picking up one of these jobs when he's got his degree.

IF RR workers get all these jobs that will be three years of study and £60,000 of debt for nothing

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I guess there would be an element of military and transport procurement subsidising those jobs probably to the tune of tens of thousands of pounds per job. When you think about it there are few sources of wealth producing industries to support the Exchequer, God knows how we balance the books.....well a multi trillion deficit says we don't.

Edited by crashmonitor

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But my step son is going off to university for three year in the hope of picking up one of these jobs when he's got his degree.

IF RR workers get all these jobs that will be three years of study and £60,000 of debt for nothing

He should out source his degree and cut out the middle man.

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Surely the Bank of Japan can print up some more yen? It's been nearly a week since the last QE blast.

Boj says no

cbeebies-boj-boj_slideshow_432_243.png

Edited by 8 year itch

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Partly down to Russian sanctions - was Putin right, sanctions hurt us as well as Russia?

Problems are far deeper than that, things like sanctions could be lifted any time, blaming big bad Mr Putin is just an excuse.

This exposes the lie that is the recovery in the UK (and other) economy, people might be buying more cars (on credit) but airlines clearly buying that many very expensive planes. I suspect RR have been putting this off for a while hoping the global economy would really pick-up as you don't want to lose skilled engineers unless you have to.

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i have a work colleague who has a BTL in Bristol. He was born and brought up in the area and thinks its the centre of the universe. He's constantly going on about the quality (high paying) jobs there, RR being one of the prime examples he uses, and will not entertain for one second the thought that these jobs could disappear. i know they haven't revealed the redundancy locations yet but i'll certainly be drawing his attention to this.

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I've got a few mates who work for RR in senior technical roles. All worked/work on development of the trent engine for XWB aircraft and it sounds like this is where the cuts are going to be focussed. Going to be squeaky bum time for them.

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HIGHLY skilled jobs...they take generations to develop and when they are gone they do not come back.

Don't quite see the point. If the jobs are needed then people wouldn't be made redundant.

if they are so highly skilled, then there would be no possibility to outsource them, or the process would be uneconomic.

I'm not sure how many "highly skilled" jobs there are in assembly/manufacture these days. In the old days you needed craftsmen. Now machines/robots do most of the highly skilled work and the rest is simple assembly.

My guess is that aero engine manufacture involves meticulous attention to detail, but is not highly skilled, even though the people doing it probably claim so. Designing one of the things in the first place, that's where the skill is.

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Don't quite see the point. If the jobs are needed then people wouldn't be made redundant.

if they are so highly skilled, then there would be no possibility to outsource them, or the process would be uneconomic.

I'm not sure how many "highly skilled" jobs there are in assembly/manufacture these days. In the old days you needed craftsmen. Now machines/robots do most of the highly skilled work and the rest is simple assembly.

My guess is that aero engine manufacture involves meticulous attention to detail, but is not highly skilled, even though the people doing it probably claim so. Designing one of the things in the first place, that's where the skill is.

I thought it was based around the rumour they had over cooked sales figures/forecasts.

I have had some dealings with Rolls, they are far too 'big', plenty of the positions are not related to the skilled manufacture/assembly side, or the design side, but tiers of admin and management, some of which are pretty much just email postboxes or spellcheckers.

You talk of machines doing the highly skilled work, but a machine can do nothing initially without process/programming engineers, toolmakers, skilled operators and inspectors.

The precision assembly side of things is a highly skilled job, these things do not just simply 'bolt together' in fact the greater use of composites in aircraft will require specialist skills and craft.

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I thought it was based around the rumour they had over cooked sales figures/forecasts.

I have had some dealings with Rolls, they are far too 'big', plenty of the positions are not related to the skilled manufacture/assembly side, or the design side, but tiers of admin and management, some of which are pretty much just email postboxes or spellcheckers.

You talk of machines doing the highly skilled work, but a machine can do nothing initially without process/programming engineers, toolmakers, skilled operators and inspectors.

The precision assembly side of things is a highly skilled job, these things do not just simply 'bolt together' in fact the greater use of composites in aircraft will require specialist skills and craft.

Right then. So the obvious conclusion is that they don't need the people, as the assembly is so difficult it would be impossible to outsource anywhere else without massive cost and long term training.

So why would a business keep people that it doesn't need ?

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From the press release a bit of an admission that there is not so much in the way of new engne development, hence highly skilled likely to go. Elsewhere Weir - pumps and stuff with a lot of oil and gas exposure closing a few plants abroad yet they are saying that they have not been hit by any overall fall in requirements from that sector - they will thoguh with prices where they are.

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From the press release a bit of an admission that there is not so much in the way of new engne development, hence highly skilled likely to go. Elsewhere Weir - pumps and stuff with a lot of oil and gas exposure closing a few plants abroad yet they are saying that they have not been hit by any overall fall in requirements from that sector - they will thoguh with prices where they are.

Last big commerical engine rolls developed pretty much busted them IIRC.

Most of the stuff since then is probably just iterations of the base RB211 design. Although the base design has probably been so altered by now that it looks little like the original.

What big engine design work is out there going forwards ? airbus/boeing passenger stuff on the A380/dreamliner must now be finished. JSF as well.

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From the press release a bit of an admission that there is not so much in the way of new engne development, hence highly skilled likely to go. Elsewhere Weir - pumps and stuff with a lot of oil and gas exposure closing a few plants abroad yet they are saying that they have not been hit by any overall fall in requirements from that sector - they will thoguh with prices where they are.

Last big commerical engine rolls developed pretty much busted them IIRC.

Most of the stuff since then is probably just iterations of the base RB211 design. Although the base design has probably been so altered by now that it looks little like the original.

What big engine design work is out there going forwards ? airbus/boeing passenger stuff on the A380/dreamliner must now be finished. JSF as well.

XWB engines are tweaked Trent 1000 (as you say all stem from RB211) for more power, higher fuel efficiency. But I would of thought fuel efficiency development would be a continuous thing and keep current numbers of designers/engineers busy. Wonder if expansion of manufacturing/assembly facilities in Singapore is partly to blame.

Weir Group in the UK swing from 'Everything is great, aren't we doing well, we're cash rich' to 'Everything is terrible, cut costs, redundancies' on quite a regular basis, at the first hint of a drop in sales.

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Weir Group in the UK swing from 'Everything is great, aren't we doing well, we're cash rich' to 'Everything is terrible, cut costs, redundancies' on quite a regular basis, at the first hint of a drop in sales.

Sounds like the British economy. Perhaps they should save in the boom times to mitigate the bust.

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