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If You Don't Understand Your Pension, Put It Into Property Says Rightmove

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http://www.rightmove.co.uk/news/articles/the-property-pension-guide

If you don’t understand your pension then transfer it into Property for tax free returns.

The myth that hangs over transferring your pension into property often relates to cost, complexity or ‘it’s just not possible’ so this short guide intends to set the record straight.


Any thought of housing crash completely cancelled.

Which spivs are selling 'turn your pension into property' seminars?

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http://www.rightmove.co.uk/news/articles/the-property-pension-guide

If you don’t understand your pension then transfer it into Property for tax free returns.

The myth that hangs over transferring your pension into property often relates to cost, complexity or ‘it’s just not possible’ so this short guide intends to set the record straight.

Any thought of housing crash completely cancelled.

Which spivs are selling 'turn your pension into property' seminars?

http://www.bbc.com/news/business-26666103

Freed of the need to put their pension savings into an annuity, new pensioners may decide to use the money to invest in property instead.

Mark Giddens, partner of accountancy firm UHY Hacker Young, says: "With pensioners no longer being railroaded into investing in annuities, they will be looking for other higher-yielding investments - that inevitably means a huge boost to buy-to-let investments.

"Unfortunately, it is often the case that the higher the yield, the higher the risk."

There is also one other big hole in this theory. The City watchdog's recent review of annuities found that the average pension pot was only £17,700. That is hardly enough for a deposit, let alone a house or flat.

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I would say the pension changes has made property less attractive. Pensions have been a right rip off. Couldn't blame someone buy a property instead. I am looking at putting 100% of my wage into a pension over the next few years. I wouldn't be doing this if the pension rules hadn't changed.

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400337880.jpg

'We will be mortgaged til we drop – and we're happy'
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/personalfinance/borrowing/mortgages/11201657/We-will-be-mortgaged-till-we-drop-and-were-happy.html

Why the increase in this type of borrowing?

Experts say a number of factors are combining. These include low interest rates which have hurt pensioners relying on savings income or those who have recently bought annuities with their pension savings. Others find they are retiring without having cleared their ordinary mortgage, which they then need to pay off – or “convert” – into a lifetime loan.

A growing confidence that house prices are rising again has also helped, they claim, because it makes property owners feel some of the value they withdraw from their property may be replaced by future growth.

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Firstly, aren't Rightmove breaking the law by giving explicit financial advice like this?

And secondly, this is just electioneering from the Tories.

I don't see how availability of money to Finance property has any affect on its value and thereby long term returns

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Firstly, aren't Rightmove breaking the law by giving explicit financial advice like this?

And secondly, this is just electioneering from the Tories.

I don't see how availability of money to Finance property has any affect on its value and thereby long term returns

I wondered about that, if so they could be wiped out by compensation claims when the market takes a dive.

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Mark Giddens, partner of accountancy firm UHY Hacker Young, says: "With pensioners no longer being railroaded into investing in annuities, they will be looking for other higher-yielding investments - that inevitably means a huge boost to buy-to-let investments.


"Unfortunately, it is often the case that the higher the yield, the higher the risk."



What p1ssing yield?


Most post2002 BTLs are still cash negative.



Yet they carry a massive risk, namely loss of half your capital.


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Firstly, aren't Rightmove breaking the law by giving explicit financial advice like this?

And secondly, this is just electioneering from the Tories.

I don't see how availability of money to Finance property has any affect on its value and thereby long term returns

Yes. I spent too much time with lawyers, who are dumb as fck as a rule. They only thing they show any aptitude at is not getting exposed legally.

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Mori poll from a few days ago says the reason for 16% of people planning on cashing in their pension pots is "investment in property". Another 14% said it would be "to help their children", so I guess a good chunk of this will be BOMAD funding for property. So property in aggregate probably trumps the number one destination for pension cash with 20%..."taking a holiday"!

I give up.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/personalfinance/pensions/11191764/200000-will-cash-in-pension-pot-under-reforms-study-finds.html

Edited by silver surfer

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Rightmove looks to grab a headline or two ....

With Zoopla now also a listed company, I expect RM sees all the more need to keep itself in the public's mind.

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Mori poll from a few days ago says the reason for 16% of people planning on cashing in their pension pots is "investment in property".

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/personalfinance/pensions/11191764/200000-will-cash-in-pension-pot-under-reforms-study-finds.html

All that lovely extra tax for Gorgeous George.

It's the bail-in that dare not speak it's name. Why confiscate cash balances when you can claim a chunk of all those pensions.

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Mori poll from a few days ago says the reason for 16% of people planning on cashing in their pension pots is "investment in property". Another 14% said it would be "to help their children", so I guess a good chunk of this will be BOMAD funding for property. So property in aggregate probably trumps the number one destination for pension cash with 20%..."taking a holiday"!

I give up.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/personalfinance/pensions/11191764/200000-will-cash-in-pension-pot-under-reforms-study-finds.html

"Mr and Mrs Average, Why would you cash in your pension pot? Select from the following ..."

"Eh? It's there to provide retirement income, not to be cashed in. But since you ask, property at least offers that, unlike the blow-it-on-a-ferrari or fly-with-Branson-to-the-moon option."

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"Mr and Mrs Average, Why would you cash in your pension pot? Select from the following ..."

"Eh? It's there to provide retirement income, not to be cashed in. But since you ask, property at least offers that, unlike the blow-it-on-a-ferrari or fly-with-Branson-to-the-moon option."

It's interesting that Australia, which was in the vanguard of driving higher pension contributions and developed the stakeholder pension model now largely adopted in this country, also applied a number of restrictions to actively prevent the "Ferrari" option.

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monkey.jpg

*sigh*

You Little People
Bob Rinear
http://www.silverbearcafe.com/private/10.14/littlepeople.html

Ms. Yellen expressed concern about "lower-income families without assets" that "can end up, very suddenly, off the road." She therefore advised families to "take the small steps that over time can lead to the accumulation of considerable assets." She did not, however, explain how they were to accumulate these assets, in light of falling incomes and zero interest rates.

This uncomfortable disconnect between theory and reality also came out during her Senate confirmation hearings last fall. Given the predicament of "the little person out there who is just trying to pay the bills and maybe put a buck away for retirement," Ms. Yellen was asked to "explain to the senior citizen who is just hoping that CD will earn some money" the impact of "a policy that says, for as far as the eye can see ... keep interest rates low." She replied: "I understand ... that savers are hurt by this policy, [but] savers wear a lot of different hats... They may be retirees who are hoping to get part-time work in order to supplement their income."

In essence, despite a zero interest rate policy that mainly helps the wealthy; struggling families with falling incomes ought to take steps to accumulate "considerable assets," as retirees take part-time jobs to make ends meet. Let them eat cake, indeed.


watch?v=5JO43HH7CXQ

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Mori poll from a few days ago says the reason for 16% of people planning on cashing in their pension pots is "investment in property". Another 14% said it would be "to help their children", so I guess a good chunk of this will be BOMAD funding for property. So property in aggregate probably trumps the number one destination for pension cash with 20%..."taking a holiday"!

I give up.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/personalfinance/pensions/11191764/200000-will-cash-in-pension-pot-under-reforms-study-finds.html

They'll be providing me cheap rentals for a long long time to come then at their cost

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It's interesting that Australia, which was in the vanguard of driving higher pension contributions and developed the stakeholder pension model now largely adopted in this country, also applied a number of restrictions to actively prevent the "Ferrari" option.

Richest person I know is on his fifth Porsche since I first knew him in 2005.

That's on a public sector pension.

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Richest person I know is on his fifth Porsche since I first knew him in 2005.

That's on a public sector pension.

The richest person I know drives a Porsche and works in senior management for a cancer charity

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Richest person I know is on his fifth Porsche since I first knew him in 2005.

That's on a public sector pension.

Mind you, it's nice of him to have recycled his money into plentiful 2nd hand Porsches for the proles

What do his kids think, or a they public sector too and believe in the inherent meaninglessness of money?

Edited by Si1

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The richest person I know drives a Porsche and works in senior management for a cancer charity

Ah, the 3rd Sector...tax relieved and huge industry, filling high streets the country over, and warehouses in the country.

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Ah, the 3rd Sector...tax relieved and huge industry, filling high streets the country over, and warehouses in the country.

Hateful Tory scum

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In essence, despite a zero interest rate policy that mainly helps the wealthy; struggling families with falling incomes ought to take steps to accumulate "considerable assets," as retirees take part-time jobs to make ends meet. Let them eat cake, indeed.

and as soon as those taking "the small steps" to get ahead do get one step ahead then cut the ground right out from underneath them.

Edited by billybong

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http://www.rightmove.co.uk/news/articles/the-property-pension-guide

If you don’t understand your pension then transfer it into Property for tax free returns.

The myth that hangs over transferring your pension into property often relates to cost, complexity or ‘it’s just not possible’ so this short guide intends to set the record straight.

Any thought of housing crash completely cancelled.

Which spivs are selling 'turn your pension into property' seminars?

Tax free?

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Hateful Tory scum

Youve never heard of the 3rd Sector?

Government expenditure on the voluntary sector, by spending category, 2009/10

almanac2012-q24-3.png

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