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Si1

Is It Safe To Do A U Turn On A Busy Road?

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I don't think so.

It is one of my pet peeves when I see drivers doing this when the easier, and much safer, option is to simply take the next turning and go around a block. I don't understand why people do it.

Just because you can do something doesn't mean you should. Perhaps when being taught new drivers are told how to do it but not whether they should do it.

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Attempting a u turn from a layby or a field entrance 30 yards down a busy 50/60 limit road because you've taken the wrong exit on a roundabout, rather than driving on for a bit and finding a minor road or a roundabout to do it instead, is not the best option imo. Doesn't seem to stop people trying though.

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Jott and tmt

I was guilty of it the other day (tired and low patience) and to be frank, in hindsight, you two are right.

Very risky manoeuvre and in slightly different circumstances could have killed someone.

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Nothing was coming the other way but I didn't notice the car coming up behind me, who saw my manouvre coming and gave me space before ticking me off, correctly IMHO, with a short peep

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Nothing was coming the other way but I didn't notice the car coming up behind me, who saw my manouvre coming and gave me space before ticking me off, correctly IMHO, with a short peep

lucky he wasnt a motorcyclist doing 97.3 MPH

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I am sure it is fine if you have clear site of traffic both directions for a good distance - and a reasonable spot to do a quick turn.

Coppers do it all the time and they are all 'advanced' drivers remember :)

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Nothing was coming the other way but I didn't notice the car coming up behind me, who saw my manouvre coming and gave me space before ticking me off, correctly IMHO, with a short peep

Did you accept his peep graciously or did you flip him the bird? In my experience if someone carries out a risky manoeuvre on the road and someone points this out to them they get rather defensive.

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Did you accept his peep graciously or did you flip him the bird? In my experience if someone carries out a risky manoeuvre on the road and someone points this out to them they get rather defensive.

I never take peeps graciously..always see red.

You see I cope with the most shocking mistakes because my observation is pretty good....if a car pulls out on me within yards to react I have usually anticipated it (well in 33 years of driving that is actually an always so far) and we wave at each other friendly like.

But God help me if I make a mistake even half as bad.

A tooter is someone who is a bad driver who has totally s%%t observation skills and fails to realise that drivers do make mistakes.

It takes two to make a crash and as we all avoid others mistakes 99.9% of the time then surely the person who manages to make a crash out of it on the 0.1% occasion is mainly to blame not the person who makes the initial error....ie. the tooter.

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I never take peeps graciously..always see red.

You see I cope with the most shocking mistakes because my observation is pretty good....if a car pulls out on me within yards to react I have usually anticipated it (well in 33 years of driving that is actually an always so far) and we wave at each other friendly like.

But God help me if I make a mistake even half as bad.

A tooter is someone who is a bad driver who has totally s%%t observation skills and fails to realise that drivers do make mistakes.

The more the noise, the less the danger, If it's a really near miss, neither driver has time to waste on the horn, they're far to busy trying to avoid a collision. Tooters often simultaneously accelerate to make a minor situation more look dramatic, idiots!

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I disagree - tooting is often required to tell someone they have just done something stupid - as many are totally oblivious to the matter. Although saying that the majority get angry and take offence to it and have no idea what you are tooting for.

Case in point yesterday. Driving along a very busy central Edinburgh road - two lanes each way.. Taxi driver coming other way and waiting to turn across the traffic. He was literally sitting in almost completely the opposite side of the road - and appeared oblivious that every car in my lane had to slow down - indicate - and move into the near lane to get past.

When it was my turn I gave him a toot and a shrug of the shoulders as I went past. Needless to say he responded with shouting and wild gesticulation. I think he knew exactly what he was doing and just didn't give a ******. Maybe if enough people beeped at him - he nay eventually take some notice.

Never a police car around in these situations !!

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I've tooted people for things like pulling out right in front of me when I'm already on a roundabout - after I've finished braking to avoid crashing in to the idiot of course.

Everyone makes mistakes occasionally but some people make them a lot more than they should (and don't even regard them as mistakes).

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I disagree - tooting is often required to tell someone they have just done something stupid - as many are totally oblivious to the matter. Although saying that the majority get angry and take offence to it and have no idea what you are tooting for.

Case in point yesterday. Driving along a very busy central Edinburgh road - two lanes each way.. Taxi driver coming other way and waiting to turn across the traffic. He was literally sitting in almost completely the opposite side of the road - and appeared oblivious that every car in my lane had to slow down - indicate - and move into the near lane to get past.

When it was my turn I gave him a toot and a shrug of the shoulders as I went past. Needless to say he responded with shouting and wild gesticulation. I think he knew exactly what he was doing and just didn't give a ******. Maybe if enough people beeped at him - he nay eventually take some notice.

Never a police car around in these situations !!

The only time I use a horn is when a car is reversing into my stationary vehicle such as in a supermarket car park thereby warning them to stop reversing.

There are very few times when a horn is useful when a car pulls out on you...it's just too late and it is up to you to avoid them.

Use of the horn then is most likely a show of anger.

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I disagree - tooting is often required to tell someone they have just done something stupid - as many are totally oblivious to the matter. Although saying that the majority get angry and take offence to it and have no idea what you are tooting for.

Case in point yesterday. Driving along a very busy central Edinburgh road - two lanes each way.. Taxi driver coming other way and waiting to turn across the traffic. He was literally sitting in almost completely the opposite side of the road - and appeared oblivious that every car in my lane had to slow down - indicate - and move into the near lane to get past.

When it was my turn I gave him a toot and a shrug of the shoulders as I went past. Needless to say he responded with shouting and wild gesticulation. I think he knew exactly what he was doing and just didn't give a ******. Maybe if enough people beeped at him - he nay eventually take some notice.

Never a police car around in these situations !!

No, the horn is for warning not showing displeasure.

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No, the horn is for warning not showing displeasure.

I totally agree! If you want to show "displeasure" you point your buttocks out of the window and defacate!

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I've tooted people for things like pulling out right in front of me when I'm already on a roundabout - after I've finished braking to avoid crashing in to the idiot of course.

Everyone makes mistakes occasionally but some people make them a lot more than they should (and don't even regard them as mistakes).

Nobody makes mistakes deliberately...if I make one I really beat myself up for months afterwards...that's probably why I haven't had an accident when moving since 1983, I did get rear ended at roundabout a couple of years ago when stationary...it's difficult to be giving way onto a busy road and policing your rear end at the same time.

The worst mistake I made this year was a car that decided to turn right at the last minute and I had momentarily taken my eyes off the road and I had to brake sharpish. I am still cursing myself for that weeks later.

The older I get the more fallible I think I am.....but my insurance premium says otherwise. It seems to me to be a bit arrogant and a suggestion of infallibilty for those who use the horn out of rage.

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Tooting the horn and flashing the lights are always a warning signal of your presence. Should not be used in anger after the fact, or to signal your are giving way to someone else to move, such as from a junction to a main road. I always ignore those signals as I'd be in the wrong if anything happened.

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