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Uk Told To Pay £1.7Bn Extra To Eu

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globaleconomicanalysis.blogspot.co.uk/2014/10/hyperventilation-charade-eu-demands.html

Hyperventilation Charade

It's easy to see through Cameron's hyperventilation charade.

Cameron did not really say "We won't pay" as the Reuters headline states. Rather, Cameron stated "I'm not paying that bill on Dec. 1".

The latter statement would be true if Cameron paid the bill on any date before or after December 1, or the amount changed by a penny.

This is the kind of wishy-washy nonsense that Cameron pulls all the time. Unfortunately, conservative believers fall for it every time.

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Dim Dave's reaction was like Kerry Katona's when the tax demand comes through the letter box.

It was his own ONS who provided the EU with the data on revised (up) GDP.

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It also gets me that Britain is running a deficit twice that of the EU has more debt we have done QE. How do they figure all this in to their calculations? Seem silly to pay loads into the EU for them to pay it back to our rich land owners Like IDS's family.

I would rather Keep the money in Britain and we will decide how much rich land owners get. If the French want to pay their farmers loads of money that's their choice.

Also if France is twice as big as Britain do they get twice as much in land subsidy.

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I would rather Keep the money in Britain and we will decide how much rich land owners get. If the French want to pay their farmers loads of money that's their choice.

Also if France is twice as big as Britain do they get twice as much in land subsidy.

I rather understood that it was all a ploy to keep the commies out...

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Dave has another by-election to lose soon? He is just trying his best to look tough standing up to the EZ because UKIP are picking up votes like mad. Hopefully more Tories will go over to UKIP and the nationalistic parties will challenge the EZ in their own back yard, forcing a proper debate on the Euro Gravy Circus.

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I was just reading that the average person in Britain pays £180 to the EU and get £105 back.

Wouldn't it be better if there was a separate EU tax and everybody could be told what their specific £180 was spent on and everybody that receives the money could have all the names of the people that gave them the money. Then each person would have the right to go and meet the person that had got their money and ask them what they did with it.

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Dave is playing a dangerous game here.

Wants to show the potential UKIP support that he's standing up to the eu, but risks getting us voted out on the referendum by stirring up media interest.

Anyway, at least it is bringing the debate to a head.

Just out of interest, what is Millibrand saying he would do about it ?

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so, we are to pay more because we are doing well...So is Italy, they must be really flying.

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This cracks me up. It's like a shifty crime gang. Pimp A (lets call him Camera Ron) is boasting about how much his hoes have been bringing in, blagging how rich he is. Mr Big sends round the heavies for his 'cut'. Camera Ron suddenly panicks, realising all the lies he has been telling about how much money he is making, and the fake cash he has been waving around, have now got him into SERIOUS trouble...

aahahahahaahahahah

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Of course we're not going to pay it, there's an election coming up in less than a year. It'll take the EU ages to bring this through the courts - certainly past next May - so Cameron is most likely leaving this as a sh1t-bomb for Labour who he knows are going to win.

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Of course we're not going to pay it, there's an election coming up in less than a year. It'll take the EU ages to bring this through the courts - certainly past next May - so Cameron is most likely leaving this as a sh1t-bomb for Labour who he knows are going to win.

I wonder if the EU would take two aircraft carries without any planes as payment.

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All he's said is he won't pay it on 1st Dec.

He hasn't said he won't pay it on 2nd Dec or any other day.

That said, since he's happy to take the uplift in output and since the formulas are all agreed it's a little odd that it came as a shock to him. One wonders if Osborne set him up to make him look like a d1ck.

That said, since this represents 20years back contributions, I'd have thought the sensible response would be to negotiate payments by installments over, say 5-10 years. When he's climbed back into his pram I'm sure that's what'll happen.

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All he's said is he won't pay it on 1st Dec.

He hasn't said he won't pay it on 2nd Dec or any other day.

Exactly, He'll make a great noise about standing up to them, then cave in later like the wet paper bag he is.

I loathe Cameron and long for the day that the Conservative party is lead by a Conservative.

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in-bruges-coke-hookers.jpg

An economy based on property has much to fear
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/business/comment/jim-armitage-an-economy-based-on-property-has-much-to-fear-9812511.html

Superficially, October’s feedback had much to cheer – order books are swelling in most sectors, employment is expected to increase, and access to credit has improved.

But it is striking how much of this positive stuff is related, directly or indirectly, to the property market.

Business services firms – accountants, lawyers and the like – are growing because of an increase in construction deals; manufacturing and retail sales are being kept afloat by sales of kitchens, bathrooms and furniture thanks to people moving house; business investment is growing as firms spend more on doing up their premises or moving to new sites. Property, property, property.

Exporters, meanwhile, were gloomy, with all, from farmers to manufacturers, complaining of eurozone weakness, Russian belligerence and war in the Middle East. That means we will be reliant on the domestic economy for years to come. With this still clearly so dominated by the world of bricks and mortar, one has to wonder, what would happen if interest rates start to rise?


Osborne’s choice of words are sounding the alarm bells
http://www.theguardian.com/business/economics-blog/2014/oct/24/george-osborne-uk-economy-tax-election
But it is the chancellor’s words that set off the alarm bells. He said: “If we want to avoid a return to the chaos and instability of the past, then we need to carry on working through our economic plan that is delivering stability and security.”

Adopting the word “chaos” is at once interesting and alarming. He seems to be saying that any other path than the one he has chosen will bring with it a swirling storm of instability.

Billing himself as Lord Protector, Osborne risks overstating his case, especially when the GDP numbers are so strong. Growth is moderating, but most surveys report that businesses remain confident about the recovery and continue to hire more staff. As a result, unemployment continues to fall.

So what can he be worried about? There is the three months of restrained housing market activity. If it’s true, and we don’t fully understand the link, that much of the recovery is connected to the increase in property buying, then any slowdown is a cause for concern. Except the chancellor wanted the housing market to cool. And his policies are largely the reason banks are refusing to dole out loans after he gave regulators instructions in April to clampdown on risky mortgage lending.

A slowdown in housebuilding was also a logical knock-on effect, given that a majority of homes are constructed by a private building sector keen to maintain its extraordinary profit levels.

We know he is worried about the slowdown in exports, which didn’t take off four years ago, as he had expected. The eurozone’s impending recession is largely to blame, but a lack of support to exporters, particularly multimillion-pound credit insurance, has also proved a barrier.

However, the crucial issue is the government’s finances, which have worsened this year despite the strong recovery.

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What do you expect when everyone is told....we are on the up, the economy is improving...things are looking better...gdp up, productivity up, unemployment down......you can't have your cake and eat it....whatever the figures are they can work both to your advantage and to your disadvantage, ask any relatively well paid middle class working tax payer.....in one hand, out the other. ;)

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As I see it there are more than enough countries who stand to lose to vote against so an alternative proposal seems certain. It is not a case of the EU imposing anything on anyone despite what the Daily Mail and it's brainwashed readers would wish you to believe.

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As I see it there are more than enough countries who stand to lose to vote against so an alternative proposal seems certain. It is not a case of the EU imposing anything on anyone despite what the Daily Mail and it's brainwashed readers would wish you to believe.

I just think the g20 is the way forward. The one thing the EU could have done was get rid of tax havens. The only people that want tax havens are the 1%. This thing with Ireland and Luxembourg is nuts don't see anything happening do you.

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They seem to playing a double fix ploy in trying to gain votes from a possible housing boom but at the same time as trying to claim they're trying to cool it all down.

It's the double charlatan ploy following on from Blair/Brown's claimed no boom no bust/no housing boom and bust/prudence ploys.

As usual it's not that easy to find out what the exact figures currently are in all this smoke and mirrors stuff but in August 2012 thisismoney published a chart going up to about 2010 (in the link below).


http://

www.thisismoney.co.uk/money/news/article-2052433/Chart-How-does-Britain-pay-EU-does-back.html

2010 seems to be a relevant date as apparently the new rules for setting out the payments were established in 2010 with Cameron as PM and for sure he would have had to agree them.

Why he seems to be feigning so much surprise at the outcome of the new rules as the November 2014 by-election and the May 2015 general election approach is maybe no surprise.

The LibLabCon are always very keen to always refer to the "rebate" rather than looking at the whole picture but in 2010 it seems that the UK paid about £13 billion and got a rebate of about £6 billion.

So if the UK has to pay an extra £1.7 billion that would add up to a payment of nearly £15 billion and after taking off the rebate that would be about £9 billion (assuming the core figures are more or less the same as in 2010?)*.

It's quite amusing that Cameron claims he's going to refuse to pay on the due date (as if he's so shocked by the eu's demand) at the same time as the UK's 31 October deadline for tax form submission approaches for a lot of taxpayers. Maybe they're going to take a page from Cameron's book and not pay the bill.

===============================================================================================

*Edit to add that the rebate reduced significantly after 2010 down to about £3.5 billion and in 2013 it was about £4 billion.

After 2010 apparently the UK contributions to the eu have gone up by about £2 billion (so presumably the extra £1.7 billion now being demanded is on top of the increase since 2010).

All apparently due to Blair's "negotiations" with the eu in 2005 - and the acceptance of the outcome of those negotiations by the current government.

For the UK's people it's been another of those double/triple whammys.

Edited by billybong

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Part of me thinks this is a ploy concocted by the Conservatives & EU.

EU & Dave both want us to stay in eu, so they create a big WIN for Dave by getting him to stand up to the eu's nasty demand for £1.7bn

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As I see it there are more than enough countries who stand to lose to vote against so an alternative proposal seems certain. It is not a case of the EU imposing anything on anyone despite what the Daily Mail and it's brainwashed readers would wish you to believe.

Yes those horrid Daily Mail readers wanting a referendum theyve been promised many times, the brainwashed swines.

Theyre not as superior as Express readers are they, and done come close Guardian readers.

Not you though Polly, youre not brainwashed you know the difference as you're a cut above.

Edited by Corruption

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The fine for not paying it is something like £250 million, so it's a no brainer not to pay it, ergo, they will pay it because they are stupid *******.

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Part of me thinks this is a ploy concocted by the Conservatives & EU.

EU & Dave both want us to stay in eu, so they create a big WIN for Dave by getting him to stand up to the eu's nasty demand for £1.7bn

The cynical side of me was thinking the same

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