Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Second Conservative Mp Defects To Ukip ++B R E A K I N G++


pl1
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 198
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

I hope Andy Slaughter Labour MP joins UKIP...LOL

Seem to remember Reckless hitting the headlines because he got pished in the commons bar the night before an important vote so missed the vote.

yes, lets get all the ones with funny names into the right jobs as well.

I think slaughter would make quite a good secretary of defence.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So the anti establishment/ anti Westminster cult party, are happy to recruit the establishment?

Its possible UKIP serves a purpose if Cameron can decant all his right wing nutter/eurphobe members into it though.

Mark Reckless and Douglas Carswell are hardly the establishment. Neither of them are drone MPs. They are both radicals out on the fringe.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's very reminiscent of the period before the 1997 election with the Conservatives beset with sleaze, scandal and graft etc etc etc. Once it gained momentum their bad news was daily for months on end. Then there was stuff like arms to Iraq etc along with all the economic incompetence around Black Wednesday etc - to say the least.

Before the 2010 general election Cameron was portraying himself as another "straightforward kind of guy" like Blair liked to portray himself as - but now?

The sleazy ones are all in UKIP now. Makes it easier to find them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The sleazy ones are all in UKIP now. Makes it easier to find them.

But the crony capitalists who darent rock the gravy train are still in the Tory party.

The Tory party, the party that cannot make a decision on building a runaway in 5 years in power, but can happily vote on taking Britain to war to kill lots of people in the Middle East.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It really isn't. On 8th May 2015 the UK will have one of the following governments:

1. Labour majority

2. Labour-Lib Dem coalition

3. Conservative-Lib Dem coalition

4. Conservative majority

Any of these seem like something to look forward to?

Quite. Especially when they are actually all of the same anyway. I find UKIP voters as touchingly naive as the young Tory voters who thought things would get better under a Conservative government in 2010.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think this is actually good news for Cameron although he may not realise it at the moment. If the two by elections are won then more of the reactionary right will quit leaving the Tories as a socially and economically liberal party more in line with the thoughts of younger voters.

If UKIP fail to win the the by elections then it shuts up the Eurosceptics in the party.

UKIP is the boomers party. Anyone who thinks they produce radical change (with the exception of the EU) is deluded.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think this is actually good news for Cameron although he may not realise it at the moment. If the two by elections are won then more of the reactionary right will quit leaving the Tories as a socially and economically liberal party more in line with the thoughts of younger voters.

If UKIP fail to win the the by elections then it shuts up the Eurosceptics in the party.

UKIP is the boomers party. Anyone who thinks they produce radical change (with the exception of the EU) is deluded.

The Tories have a difficult transition coming up over the next 15 years. By 2030 their core Eurosceptic Boomer and pre-Boomer homeowner vote will mostly have gone to the great garden centre in the sky. Their young working private renter children and grandchildren born in the 1980s-2000s look nothing like them and want completely different economic and social policies. Attracting votes from both groups simultaneously in the 2020s is going to be tricky to say the least.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Tories have a difficult transition coming up over the next 15 years. By 2030 their core Eurosceptic Boomer and pre-Boomer homeowner vote will mostly have gone to the great garden centre in the sky. Their young working private renter children and grandchildren born in the 1980s-2000s look nothing like them and want completely different economic and social policies. Attracting votes from both groups simultaneously in the 2020s is going to be tricky to say the least.

And Labour doesn't?

Post-war/working man Labour ended in the late 70s.

After various attempts, Labour (New) was rebooted as an attempt as a centre Social Democratic party.

This version quickly distorted into the public sector workers party.

How on earth can Labour roll-back public spending and jobs and still have an electoral base?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And Labour doesn't?

Post-war/working man Labour ended in the late 70s.

After various attempts, Labour (New) was rebooted as an attempt as a centre Social Democratic party.

This version quickly distorted into the public sector workers party.

How on earth can Labour roll-back public spending and jobs and still have an electoral base?

Yep, Labour have a big transition coming too. Their core electorate of Boomer/pre-Boomer working class voters living in council housing is also going to head to the great bingo hall in the sky over the same period.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yep, Labour have a big transition coming too. Their core electorate of Boomer/pre-Boomer working class voters living in council housing is also going to head to the great bingo hall in the sky over the same period.

To some extent being filled with influx of Asian voters in former industrial heartlands. Aka Rotherham

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think this is actually good news for Cameron although he may not realise it at the moment. If the two by elections are won then more of the reactionary right will quit leaving the Tories as a socially and economically liberal party more in line with the thoughts of younger voters.

If UKIP fail to win the the by elections then it shuts up the Eurosceptics in the party.

UKIP is the boomers party. Anyone who thinks they produce radical change (with the exception of the EU) is deluded.

Good post. Not sure Cameron is capable of anything other than short term knee jerk thought though

Labour faced down their extremists - Derek hatton & Co. Cameron should do the same, but has instead chosen to react with knee jerk jingoist nonsense. At heart he's a coward. He'll be ousted soon enough.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The problem with UKIP is that Farage talks sense, but the wider party is drawn from the nutcase rightwing fringe of Conservatives who are unhappy with Cameron.

So you have a bunch of crazy NIMBYs who would probably like to bring back hanging, blame gay marriage for meteorological events, and who are doing quite well out of house price inflation, thank you very much, led by perhaps the only high-profile politician who is willing to stand up and just say what he believes (and what half the country is thinking).

I considered voting UKIP because they are the only dissenting voice in politics at the moment (the other three parties agree on everything). But the nutters in the party made it impossible.

The disproportionate amount of press coverage that UKIP get as compared to the Green party - the only other viable 'fourth party' choice - is criminal.

If only Scotland had voted Yes, or the AV vote had gone through. It seems no matter who wins elections the establishment wins every vote that matters.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Grant Shapps/Michael Green on BBC News now calling Mark Reckless a liar and saying that "there are only two options for the general election, David Cameron or Ed Milidand, voting for anything else, particularly UKIP is a vote for Ed Miliband".

Well, Mr Green, my choice for the next prime minister is Nigel Farage, Ed Miliband and David Cameron, in that order. I say that as a lifelong Conservative who knocked on doors for Maggie Thatcher.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Grant Shapps/Michael Green on BBC News now calling Mark Reckless a liar and saying that "there are only two options for the general election, David Cameron or Ed Milidand, voting for anything else, particularly UKIP is a vote for Ed Miliband".

Well, Mr Green, my choice for the next prime minister is Nigel Farage, Ed Miliband and David Cameron, in that order. I say that as a lifelong Conservative who knocked on doors for Maggie Thatcher.

Shapps' response has been arrogant and poorly thought through. The more the Conservative leadership attack UKIP defectors the more people within the Conservative party who sympathise with UKIP will feel there is no room for them in the Conservative party anymore.

The "vote for us or you'll get Miliband" line is wearing pretty thin. Most of the population can see there isn't much difference between the Oxford-PPE-educated ex-Spad London property millionaire David Cameron and the Oxford-PPE-educated ex-Spad London property millionaire Ed Miliband.

Edited by Dorkins
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Grant Shapps/Michael Green on BBC News now calling Mark Reckless a liar and saying that "there are only two options for the general election, David Cameron or Ed Milidand, voting for anything else, particularly UKIP is a vote for Ed Miliband".

Well, Mr Green, my choice for the next prime minister is Nigel Farage, Ed Miliband and David Cameron, in that order. I say that as a lifelong Conservative who knocked on doors for Maggie Thatcher.

They wish.

They said that before the eu elections. It's clear they've run out of ideas and are well out of date and behind.

Edited by billybong
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The problem with UKIP is that Farage talks sense, but the wider party is drawn from the nutcase rightwing fringe of Conservatives who are unhappy with Cameron.

I personally think it is a pity that UKIP is standing in national elections for the same reason. It doesn't yet have a focus.

Certainly, I would indeed be worried about accepting such defections. If Tories can apparently slot seamlessly into UKIP, what's the point. As Oscar Wilde once said, 'when two people agree, one of them is unnecessary'. The Lib Dems lost any identity in the same way once they signed up with Dave.

In a European context, Farage is anti-establishment, populist and so on. He is also very articulate and well-informed on his subject. But none of this translates in national terms. At home he is no such maverick, unlike Grillo or Marie Le Pen.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Lib Dems lost any identity in the same way once they signed up with Dave.

The Lib Dems consciously started jettisoning their identity under Ashdown as he turned them into New Labour with yellow ties. Their leadership despise the scruffy students and ale drinking sandal wearers and CND campaigners in knitwear. The Lib Dems abandoned their core voters, so the Lib Dems' core voters abandoned them and went to the Greens. Bye bye Lib Dems.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.




×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.