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Any Tips For Cutting A Wood Floor To Put In A Hearth

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First off I'm not cutting into the floorboards.

The wood floor has been laid onto of the original floorboards and covered what was left of the original hearth that had been taken out years ago by one of the previous owners.

I've been advised to use a multi-tool to cut the floor out, so that's what I'll be using.

Anyone done anything similar and have any tips about how to cut it or what easy mistakes can be avoided.

Essentially I'm aiming to cut out 1500mm by 400mm so I can put in the paving slabs on the original hearth bed and then tile on top.

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circular saw, set to the correct depth, for the straight runs and then multitool for the corners

Absolutely, the line of cut will not be good (if you need finished edge) and it will take you bloody ages with a multitool (and possibly lots of blades).

Issue after that could be ensuring bond between wood substrate and slabs, it needs to be firm, no movement at all in the wood / joists underneath the slabs, replace old floorboards with exterior ply even if not satisfactory and then slab on top. Seal wood and use a good adhesive for the job.

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They didn't have an old gas fire in there that they capped ? What are the condition of the joists and boards that butt up against the hearth underneath? On the one I worked on went from ground then rubble then hearth and the end of the joists needed repair as without a fire ventilation damp rises up. Self level compound sounds good. Not sure about the tiles.

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Are you going to use it as a real fireplace? if not just put the new hearth on top of the wood.

Some furniture is cheaper than logs or coal. :unsure:

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yep ideal if youve got both tools... i dont have a circular saw weirdly..

Only got the multitool a few weeks ago so im still a bit massively impressed

by it wish id got one years ago..

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Im a big fan of the multitool... 1500mm would take me about 6 mins, would be dead straight and would use 0.025 of a blade.. plus its SAFE

You need more practice or a better multi-tool. Would be a 2 minute job for me with the Surge.

I've actually just acquired a massive circular saw that's driven by a tractor power-take-off. I've been eyeing it up warily for a few weeks now and think I might take it, and the wood that needs cutting, and park it in the nearest space I can find to an A&E department.

1_517_leatherman_surge_2013_hr.jpg

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In order of preference:

Track saw

Circular saw

Router

Multi tool

Chisel

For gods sake don't attempt a cut like this with a fixed blade circular saw. It has to be a plunge cut.

If using a multi tool, screw battens to the piece to be removed to act as a guide.

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In order of preference:

Track saw

Circular saw

Router

Multi tool

Chisel

For gods sake don't attempt a cut like this with a fixed blade circular saw. It has to be a plunge cut.

If using a multi tool, screw battens to the piece to be removed to act as a guide.

I'd concur with the batten suggestion to give you a fence to rest against. Then (assuming wood is nail-free) I'd probably use a router with a straight bit set to a depth slightly less than the board depth. I'd plunge rout all round (making several passes at oncreasing depth) and then cut the last few mm with a chisel.

There are some very specificand challenging building regs. relating to hearth dimensions and construction for woodburners, particularly if it is the type that sits with its firebox directly on the hearth. If your woodburner is on legs ( you can buy legs for it) that keep the hearth temperature below 100C the regulations are much more straightforward and you can overlay the hearth on the wooden floor. Otherwise you have to have a "constructional hearth" set on non-combustible materials.

The building regs you need are section J

http://www.planningportal.gov.uk/buildingregulations/approveddocuments/partj/approved

navigate through this to

http://www.planningportal.gov.uk/uploads/br/BR_PDF_AD_J_2010_V2.pdf

You need p37 for the hearth but you might find the rest useful. If you're in any doubt call out a HETAS registered engineer to do the work.

PS. this may be useful http://www.stovefittersmanual.co.uk

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Plunge saw set to the right depth, running on a track. I'd use the Festool TS75 as the most suitable tool in the armoury of wood bashing devices along with a 3 m track so that can be certain it is absolutely square. Set it to 17.5 mm as the boards underneath may have nails that you cannot see (assuming the ply overlay is standard 18 mm.).

Multi tool - will look like you cut it with your teeth.

Standard circular saw - you will lose an arm

Stihl saw with a wood blade in it (seen an idiot try this.) - you end up in a box.

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I'd just get stuck in and hide any deficiencies in the cutting work with some metal edge trim and It would probably look better as well.

That's the advantage the pros have over DIYers they know the full range of trim options to paper the cracks and bring the finish up to standard.

Their stuff stays up, as well, because they can get Gripfill trade so don't need to use it so sparingly.

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You've got Festool kit? Drool.

I'm currently using the Triton one don't have any complaints at all. Got it free through work so don't know what it goes for but would guess a lot less than the Festool.

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I'm currently using the Triton one don't have any complaints at all. Got it free through work so don't know what it goes for but would guess a lot less than the Festool.

Best bit about festool kit is the resale value, look after it and you'll get 1/2 to 2/3 back, buy second hand at nearer the 1/2 price and a good chance you'll get nearly all your money back..

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Festool is "buy once" kit. It isn't cheap, but the resale value is high and it doesn't seem to go wrong. Typical example is my C12 drill - a diddly little 12v drill that outperforms anything from DeWalt and is half the size. Last month we needed to bolt up some root trusses, the builders couldn't get their Makitas anywhere near the right angle. I gave them this little thing with a right angle head on it, and they were scathing - how could a 12v drill knock 13mm holes in 6x2s. It did, perfectly, faster than they could put the bolts in.

The tracks are cool as well and everything fits together. I needed to rout a channel in a piece of wood, and was faffing about with the edge guide, then saw the track adapter in the box. 2 minutes later I had a track router, and could make a perfect, repeatable channel with no drop off at each end etc.

Recommended.

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I like drilling holes! Although I believe my tool may not look big enough!

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