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Mad Hours In The Corporate World


mikthe20

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I have a full business plan ready to go but it needs £10K-15K investment and is too off the wall for the conventional avenues. I'd cheerfully take one of these mental hours jobs just to raise said capital.

As it is I'm patiently waiting for an inheritance.

You should be able to get a loan, surely? Or some sort of 'Kickstarter' type crowd funding online?

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Hmm I suppose there is that.

I'd just like to be tested in some way, shape or form in return for money. I've generally found in all the office type jobs that I've had that I've been able to finish the day's allocation of work in about the first hour and then had to (largely unsuccessfully) pretend to be busy for the remainder. What I'd really like is to have a shit load of work dumped on me that could occupy me for an extended period.

I suppose what I'm trying to say is that in contrast to these all hours, work till you bleed types, my capacity for work has never been successfully met. I'd love a role that kept me genuinely occupied for ten hours a day, so long as somebody was coughing up decent payment in return.

eight, what is your skillset?

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Boss of $2 trillion investment firm quits after his 10-year-old daughter presents him with list of 22 milestones in her life that he had missed

1411554363133_wps_22_PIMCO_s_Chief_Execu

Top international financier Mohamed El-Erian, pictured, quit his job with a trillion dollar investment fund after his daughter wrote him a letter outlining the things he missed from her life due to his work.

That's all very well, but doubless he has already made enough to ensure that neither he nor his daughter will ever need to work (again).

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I used to look down on them Mr P...now I aspire to be one. Ocassionally I achieve it :)

P

The difference is Mr Jesus, that in a smaller company, the decisions were mine, the project was mine, and if I chose to stay late, to finish something, the decision was mine, now in a larger company, I am frequently "encouraged" to do stupid hours or weird shifts. The decision is still mine and I say no! :wacko: As Mr XYY says, once you are hooked on "overtime", they have bought your whole life!

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I have a full business plan ready to go but it needs £10K-15K investment and is too off the wall for the conventional avenues. I'd cheerfully take one of these mental hours jobs just to raise said capital.

As it is I'm patiently waiting for an inheritance.

I wouldn't mind investing in a business. Fancy pitching your idea via PM?

The only business plan I have is to make a low budget film and then sell it.

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Having made the OP it's nice to see I've kicked off a decent debate. I made the post late last night, went to bed, and then got up early to get into the office, after the commute into London. The hilarious thing is that the MD at one of the companies I posted about is on holiday and, guess what? - everyone ******ed off home at 5:15 at the latest, including the CEO! I was the last to leave at 5:30. Will be different next week when he's back. What utter nonsense! I will be making sure I keep leaving at 5ish, not matter what dirty looks I might get.

A lot of good info in this thread. The main one for me is don't miss your kids growing up! I've always worked locally for myself since the kids were born (and this contract means just 2 days a week in London), so I've been at the school gates etc and seen them grow up. So many people I know have got home at 7-8pm and the kids are already in bed. Really sad. Of course, the whole 2 salaries to buy a tiny house ethos in London means so many people are effectively slave workers with no way out. Really, really sad.

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I took and left a job recently where the owner was obsessed with people being there. What was strange is this focus on time served meant his staff werent doing anything, just messing about on the net. I like to work, and left, as sitting threre when you could be doing something useful was torture. I don't get people who can doss about all day.

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I took and left a job recently where the owner was obsessed with people being there. What was strange is this focus on time served meant his staff werent doing anything, just messing about on the net. I like to work, and left, as sitting threre when you could be doing something useful was torture. I don't get people who can doss about all day.

ah, the public sector.

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Having made the OP it's nice to see I've kicked off a decent debate. I made the post late last night, went to bed, and then got up early to get into the office, after the commute into London. The hilarious thing is that the MD at one of the companies I posted about is on holiday and, guess what? - everyone ******ed off home at 5:15 at the latest, including the CEO! I was the last to leave at 5:30. Will be different next week when he's back. What utter nonsense! I will be making sure I keep leaving at 5ish, not matter what dirty looks I might get.

A lot of good info in this thread. The main one for me is don't miss your kids growing up! I've always worked locally for myself since the kids were born (and this contract means just 2 days a week in London), so I've been at the school gates etc and seen them grow up. So many people I know have got home at 7-8pm and the kids are already in bed. Really sad. Of course, the whole 2 salaries to buy a tiny house ethos in London means so many people are effectively slave workers with no way out. Really, really sad.

Yes - it's been like that for a long time. What really changed my view on London was reading 'The Quest of the Simple Life' by William Dawson, about a Victorian wage slave who, via thrift and remote working (by post) manages to escape the slave treadmill. It's free for kindle at Amazon.

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Yes - it's been like that for a long time. What really changed my view on London was reading 'The Quest of the Simple Life' by William Dawson, about a Victorian wage slave who, via thrift and remote working (by post) manages to escape the slave treadmill. It's free for kindle at Amazon.

For me it was the book 'How to be idle?'......but that doesn't come without a lot of prior hard work and forward planning, it is unfortunate bad timing that children inevitably turn up right in the middle of the hard working phase. ;)

http://libcom.org/files/%5BTom_Hodgkinson%5D_How_To_Be_Idle%28Bookos.org%29.pdf

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Nothing beats being your own boss.

But when I was 'corporate' I was lucky enough to have good bosses who judged me on my output.

I (mostly) get judged on my output, and anything else is just stupid anyway so I've no intention of pandering to it. Best option IMO, if I was my own boss I'd have to deal with all the tedious crap involved in keeping stuff organised and planned and managed, much better to have some mug deal with the faff so I can get on with the real work.
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The main rush hour in Swansea in the evening is 3.30 till 4.00ish - that is when the public sector knocks off. It is pretty much the same across Wales with the roads getting quiet from about 5. In fact, for many years the Radio Wales afternoon news programme used to finish at 5PM because they just assumed everyone was almost home by then - used to really annoy me when I was driving home along the M4 from England.

I think there are loads of people on the autistic spectrum in the IT workplace now - and they are just obsessed with working all the hours that they can because they simply have no other life. That can make it very unhealthy and stressful for anyone who wants, well, a life and who is not interested in having his/her head in IT books 24 hours a day.

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I think there are loads of people on the autistic spectrum in the IT workplace now - and they are just obsessed with working all the hours that they can because they simply have no other life. That can make it very unhealthy and stressful for anyone who wants, well, a life and who is not interested in having his/her head in IT books 24 hours a day.

I think the 'autistic' ones often do want a life, but really thinking about what will make you happy can take some time and can involve painful experiences.

These jobs keep them busy enough to not have the time to sit back and wonder why they still aren't happy. If your entire life is either rushing to meet the deadline of one project or rushing to learn about a new technology (effectively training for a new job) for the next project, you don't have any time for self reflection.

I also think that there is danger that their social skills will atrophy further; and people who are maybe on the borderline of autism/mental illness will get caught up in this never ending project cycle.

I spent 5 years like this and I'm now in the slow process of fixing my life - but I imagine there's people that spend decades/lifetimes like this and at the end of it all think 'what was the point?'...

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The main rush hour in Swansea in the evening is 3.30 till 4.00ish - that is when the public sector knocks off. It is pretty much the same across Wales with the roads getting quiet from about 5. In fact, for many years the Radio Wales afternoon news programme used to finish at 5PM because they just assumed everyone was almost home by then - used to really annoy me when I was driving home along the M4 from England.

I think there are loads of people on the autistic spectrum in the IT workplace now - and they are just obsessed with working all the hours that they can because they simply have no other life. That can make it very unhealthy and stressful for anyone who wants, well, a life and who is not interested in having his/her head in IT books 24 hours a day.

Interesting

A problem with autism is that communication skills and forward planning are weaknesses, which a lot of sense given the state of many IT projects

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I took and left a job recently where the owner was obsessed with people being there. What was strange is this focus on time served meant his staff werent doing anything, just messing about on the net. I like to work, and left, as sitting threre when you could be doing something useful was torture. I don't get people who can doss about all day.

+1

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Software development is one of the areas that long hours culture seems to take hold. I suspect it's easier for bosses to see hours worked as a proxy for quality, rather than expose their intellectual limitations and try to understand their own deliverables properly.

For me it seems that especially in IT, managers think it's also your hobby, so they think you're happy working on things outside office hours for nothing - "Oh but it's what you do for enjoyment, isn't it? Then you can work on this project over the weekend".

When I tell them that it isn't my hobby and I do other things in my free time, they don't quite understand it.

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There have been times where have actively asked for something productive to do whilst at work....looked upon as giving someone extra work for them to do (go away and twiddle your thumbs).....well what is the point of being there if they have not got anything of any use to do, got far better things to do at home.... some even made/created work just to look busy, broke things to fix them.....madness imo. ;)

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Interesting thread, it's something which I've given a lot of thought to over the past few years.


Programmer here. I'm a 9 to 5er now and I'm so much better for it.


I've worked longer hours in a pressured environment before, nothing too mad usually 8am to 6:30pm but it took it's toll. It led to thyroid problems & burnout for me.


Smaller 'startup' type companies are the ones to look out for for me. The bosses/founders (with the equity) work crazy hours and set the expectation for others. The priority is the short-term survival success of the business not the well being of their staff.


Their ideal member of staff is an aspy type, single, male in their mid-early 20s (with not much outside of work). They'll squeeze as much out of them until they flake, replace them and repeat. I've noticed this type of company is always hiring the 'Developer' role is a permanent fixture on their website.

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Interesting thread, it's something which I've given a lot of thought to over the past few years.
Programmer here. I'm a 9 to 5er now and I'm so much better for it.
I've worked longer hours in a pressured environment before, nothing too mad usually 8am to 6:30pm but it took it's toll. It led to thyroid problems & burnout for me.
Smaller 'startup' type companies are the ones to look out for for me. The bosses/founders (with the equity) work crazy hours and set the expectation for others. The priority is the short-term survival success of the business not the well being of their staff.
Their ideal member of staff is an aspy type, single, male in their mid-early 20s (with not much outside of work). They'll squeeze as much out of them until they flake, replace them and repeat. I've noticed this type of company is always hiring the 'Developer' role is a permanent fixture on their website.

I learnt a couple of years ago that if no one is going to die, you work the hours that keep you sane and get the 80% done. You will NEVER do all the work, so don't try unless it really is a life or death situation (for example, if I was working in a WWII intel operation, I would take silly pills to work as long as it takes).

Most good bosses understand that. Sometimes, yes, an emergency may arise where you all pull an all nighter, but any firm that wants you to grind your brain to dust is not worth working for.

Of course, you need zero debt to be able to walk away if they try it. That is why debt (and high house prices) are so destructive to society. Hey, mods, back on the front page please, I made the link to HPC!!

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I learnt a couple of years ago that if no one is going to die, you work the hours that keep you sane and get the 80% done. You will NEVER do all the work, so don't try unless it really is a life or death situation (for example, if I was working in a WWII intel operation, I would take silly pills to work as long as it takes).

Most good bosses understand that. Sometimes, yes, an emergency may arise where you all pull an all nighter, but any firm that wants you to grind your brain to dust is not worth working for.

Of course, you need zero debt to be able to walk away if they try it. That is why debt (and high house prices) are so destructive to society. Hey, mods, back on the front page please, I made the link to HPC!!

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