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getknk

Middle East And Future Of Non-Fossil Fuel Energy

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I was doing some quick research into Solar energy and other types of non-fossil fuel energy. I believe as of 2014 atleast 5% of US energy is provided by Solar, though no hard figure I can provide. At this rate, it would cross >25% before 2018 !! (Though no one is publicly stating it)

Also I read an article which says, last 2 years solar power is expanding exponentially. Many cities/states have installed more solar power this year/last year than previous 30 years combined !!

My argument is , how long Middle East money rules? Will the dip in oil prices be permanent?

Would like to collect some data/articles related to non-fossil fuel energy (like the Gold Thread) !!

Cheers.

Edited by getknk

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A Saudi oil minister once said that the reason they had so much oil was that they were such good Muslims -Allah was rewarding them. So I dare say that when the oil runs out Allah will give them something else they can flog to the poor benighted infidels.

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A Saudi oil minister once said that the reason they had so much oil was that they were such good Muslims -Allah was rewarding them. So I dare say that when the oil runs out Allah will give them something else they can flog to the poor benighted infidels.

Well with all that sand they won't be short of glass, especially when all the bombs go off. Peace be upon him and all that.

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China has built vast cities from nothing within a few years.

We could built vast thorium power plants and solar farms in short time (although solar farms would be best in oil states like Libya, coincidentally) if we really wanted to

But the 'anti-extremists' like camoron seem to like the wahhabists that control most the oil.

Oil is a funny thing. I don't think anyone really knows how much there is. Back in the 60s and 70s when trying to stop motorways being built the green crazies were saying it would be gone by the late 80s. Now those same crazies are saying theres tonnes of the stuff and simply waiting for it to run out will be too late to 'save the climate' :wacko:

Chris Martenson, whose energy-economy vids are laden with stats predicted an oil crisis in both 2012 and 2013...obviously neither came to pass.

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Well with all that sand they won't be short of glass, especially when all the bombs go off. Peace be upon him and all that.

Or, like I say, North Africa and the Arabian peninsula could be carpeted in solar farms.

I'm not a superstitious type, but the Islamic world has been blessed with resources.

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Wikipedia says it's < 1% and that's just of the US electrical power generation. never mind all the gas and oil. There are millions of cars planes and ships and the vast war machine that run off fossil fuels and we are nowhere close to powering them by renewables.

Edited by ThePiltdownMan

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Maybe we've found a use for OZ at last then. Make a giant solar panel out of it - safely tucked away from all the loons.

Oi! Leave us alone down here with our spiders and snakes!

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Expand your research into fracking too and not just solar, USA is experiencing a revolution in the tech advances and is on track to turn America into a net exporter of oil and gas thus cutting its ties with the middle east. The UK would love to do that but since its all owned by the queen there isn't a huge amount of enthusiasm for it over here.

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Solar energy in many sunnier parts of the world - including large areas of the US - has reached the point where it can beat alternatives including fossil fuels on a pure cost basis.

I don't think that applies in Blighty quite yet, not just because we're not always very sunny, but also because of the scarcity and cost of land. It only really makes sense on a micro scale, typified by solar panels on the roof. Our best resource is off our coasts: specifically, the tides. We need to be developing tidal energy to become a mainstay of our grid and general-purpose supply. In the medium term it should at least be second to nuclear.

As for some poll, I'm not voting, and I'll discount votes from others who know no more than I do what they're talking about.

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I'm not a superstitious type, but the Islamic world has been blessed with resources.

There wouldn't be an islamic world were it not for the oil.

A driver for finding alternatives is to take this power away from such lunatics.

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I am a close(ish) follower of the electric car (and infrastructure) market. Transport is a massive energy user.

Unfortunately the sector is littered with company failures, electric car sales missed by a country mile and manufacturers producing loss making "access" cars to gain market entry but wish to sell no more. Rollout of charging infrastructure is miniscule.

Going to take a long longer than most realise / hope.

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EOR has been a game changer in the US. So much so that the US is close to becoming the worlds' leading producer of oil. This is likely to have the biggest impact on energy economics for the middle east.

US has vast reserves of tight oil/shale oil, which will keep it in plentiful supply for the next 20-30 years. Along with shale gas, plus other sources IMO the US's oil supply is secure for the next 50 years.

The middle east is now moving into EOR big time, but my guess is that it will have less effect there than it will have in the US.

As for renewables, Solar is great for the US. Lots of large buildings just waiting to have solar arrays on the roofs. Currently solar cells are cheap, but there really needs to be some more breakthroughs in solar cell tech to give it a real impact. My guess is that these will be made through nanotechnology fairly soon, if they haven't been already.

Bascially EOR techniques have obliterated any potential for energy shock with the running out of conventional oil. The diversification of countries into renewables over the next 40 years will mean that "peak oil" will never have the impact the doomsters claimed it would.

For the UK, we have EOR oil/gas, coal, tidal and wind. Although the UK seems to be holding back on wind at the moment, the ability to deploy wind quickly is pretty staggering, much faster than conventionals/nuclear. The smart grid plus exchange with other european energy generators means getting adequate power will not be a problem in the long term.

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Go back to the days of the cold war and we had the anti war, anti nuke etc movements funded to some extent by the Soviets. I wonder if, these days, there is some funding from the oil producing countries for the anti nuclear power, anti fracking etc. industries?

When you hear of some tradition US energy vendors calling for a tax on home solar systems you can probably say that they are competitive.

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Go back to the days of the cold war and we had the anti war, anti nuke etc movements funded to some extent by the Soviets. I wonder if, these days, there is some funding from the oil producing countries for the anti nuclear power, anti fracking etc. industries?

When you hear of some tradition US energy vendors calling for a tax on home solar systems you can probably say that they are competitive.

Definitely. There are significant VI plays on all sides.

There is such a mix of disinformation and speculation its very difficult for someone not in the business to tell what's what. The only thing you can really do is look at the numbers.

If you look here (and believe it?) the US has gone from producing half the output of SA/Russia in 2006 to become the worlds largest oil producer in 2013. Of course this doesn't tend to please the green lobby/doomsters much, who were campaigning strongly on the "oil is running out and we need to see alternatives" ticket. The ability of technology to enhance oil recovery should not be underestimated. The US is leading at the moment, but there will be other opportunities.

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EOR has been a game changer in the US. So much so that the US is close to becoming the worlds' leading producer of oil. This is likely to have the biggest impact on energy economics for the middle east.

US has vast reserves of tight oil/shale oil, which will keep it in plentiful supply for the next 20-30 years. Along with shale gas, plus other sources IMO the US's oil supply is secure for the next 50 years.

The middle east is now moving into EOR big time, but my guess is that it will have less effect there than it will have in the US.

As for renewables, Solar is great for the US. Lots of large buildings just waiting to have solar arrays on the roofs. Currently solar cells are cheap, but there really needs to be some more breakthroughs in solar cell tech to give it a real impact. My guess is that these will be made through nanotechnology fairly soon, if they haven't been already.

Bascially EOR techniques have obliterated any potential for energy shock with the running out of conventional oil. The diversification of countries into renewables over the next 40 years will mean that "peak oil" will never have the impact the doomsters claimed it would.

For the UK, we have EOR oil/gas, coal, tidal and wind. Although the UK seems to be holding back on wind at the moment, the ability to deploy wind quickly is pretty staggering, much faster than conventionals/nuclear. The smart grid plus exchange with other european energy generators means getting adequate power will not be a problem in the long term.

It's not necessary to put rabbit ears around Peak Oil. Hubbert was talking about conventional oil discovery and extraction, the science is sound. The economic consequences of resourse depletion are another issue. No Peak Oiler has ever claimed that oil reserves will be run down until they're exhausted, quite the contrary: that the economic case for their extraction will become increasingly unviable. On that point your contention that EOR techniques have obliterated any potential for energy shock is moot. Japan, the world's third biggest economy, is experiencing an energy crisis right now on which oil and gas prices have a direct bearing. The US may very well become the world's biggest oil producer but it's unclear that the true cost of that production is yet reflected in prices or profits.

As for the Uk? Just as bankrupt tomorrow with windfarms as it is today with oil wells. :)

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For the UK, we have EOR oil/gas, coal, tidal and wind. Although the UK seems to be holding back on wind at the moment, the ability to deploy wind quickly is pretty staggering, much faster than conventionals/nuclear.

Not a fan of onshore, but a sign of the times (reduced grants)? 100 jobs lost as wind farm factory enters administration

3318680.jpg?htype=0&type=mc2

NORTH-EAST wind turbine manufacturer Tag Energy Solutions has gone into administration with the loss of about 100 jobs.

The business at Haverton Hill, near Billingham has struggled to land a big order after it was hailed as a key part of the region's renewable energy sector when it opened in summer 2011. There were hopes that it had turned the corner last year when it landed a contract to build steel sections of Eon's wind farm, off the Humber Estuary, in East Yorkshire.

http://www.thenorthernecho.co.uk/news/11538320.100_jobs_lost_as_wind_farm_factory_enters_administration/

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Or, like I say, North Africa and the Arabian peninsula could be carpeted in solar farms.

I'm not a superstitious type, but the Islamic world has been blessed with resources.

But the key resource of water is in short supply in most Islamic countries. I know which I would rather have an abundance of.

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Well Lockheed Martin, see Reddit are claiming that they are within years of cracking fusion, small scale, container size.

Just might explain oil slide (part of) if there is hint that this is at all accurate.

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  1. There are an estimated 1.3 trillion barrels of proven oil reserve left in the world's major fields, which at present rates of consumption will be sufficient to last 40 years. By 2040, production levels may be down to 15 million barrels per day – around 20% of what we currently consume.

    http://www.imeche.org/knowledge/themes/energy/energy-supply/fossil-energy/when-will-oil-run-out

    So if it's at least 25 years but obviously we'll probably find more reserves before then so it could last a lot longer.

    Renewable energy technology is improving all the time but the problem there is more public perception rather than whether it's a viable alternative.

    I think we'll have workable fusion reactors within the next 20 years and ALOT more electric powered vehicles. Those two combined are what would have the biggest impact on the worlds oil consumption.

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As for renewables, Solar is great for the US. Lots of large buildings just waiting to have solar arrays on the roofs. Currently solar cells are cheap, but there really needs to be some more breakthroughs in solar cell tech to give it a real impact. My guess is that these will be made through nanotechnology fairly soon, if they haven't been already.

Indeed. The SW of the US is very sunny...IIRC Yuma is the sunniest place on earth, and virtually all of the US outside of Alaska, the PNW and parts of Michigan and Appalachia is far sunnier than virtually all of Europe. If Milan was in the US it would less sunny than any city in the lower 48.

Las Vegas looks like one of the most ungreen places on earth, and yet everyone lives in vast bungalows with massive roof surfaces. Winters are reasonably mild (most of the time!) so the sunny summer coincides with max air con use. I think LV could balance its energy needs very well.

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