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SarahBell

Energy Efficiency Hits In 2016

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http://www.foe.co.uk/sites/default/files/downloads/private_rented_homes.pdf

“From 2016, any tenant or their representatives asking for their landlord’s
consent to make reasonable energy efficiency improvements cannot be
refused. From 2018, the rental of the very worst performing properties—those
rated F and G—will be banned through a minimum energy efficiency
standard.”
Rt Hon Chris Huhne MP, 10 May 2011


How much impact will this have on landlords and tenants?


What's a reasonable energy efficiency improvement?

Asking for central heating rather than storage heaters? CW or Loft Insulation? External insulation?
"The very worst properties (Energy Efficiency rating Band G) are more than four times as
common in the private rented sector as in the social sector.ii"

So there's still some awful properties in the social sector.
-
Having just seen a LL knock back a property (band E EPC) - one with no gas, no central heating and some really cheap storage heaters then have they done that because they know next year a tenant can ask for better heating?
Edited by SarahBell

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http://www.foe.co.uk/sites/default/files/downloads/private_rented_homes.pdf

“From 2016, any tenant or their representatives asking for their landlord’s
consent to make reasonable energy efficiency improvements cannot be
refused. From 2018, the rental of the very worst performing properties—those
rated F and G—will be banned through a minimum energy efficiency
standard.”
Rt Hon Chris Huhne MP, 10 May 2011

How much impact will this have on landlords and tenants?

What's a reasonable energy efficiency improvement?

Asking for central heating rather than storage heaters? CW or Loft Insulation? External insulation?

"The very worst properties (Energy Efficiency rating Band G) are more than four times as
common in the private rented sector as in the social sector.ii"

So there's still some awful properties in the social sector.

-
Having just seen a LL knock back a property (band E EPC) - one with no gas, no central heating and some really cheap storage heaters then have they done that because they know next year a tenant can ask for better heating?

The government is currently analysing the results of the consultation on the regulations pertaining to this (the consultation ran until 2nd September this year).

Expect much lobbying from landlords' bodies and subsequently for the whole thing to be watered down beyond recognition / kicked into the long grass.

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/private-rented-sector-energy-efficiency-regulations-domestic

Edit: to add linky

Edited by Snugglybear

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Don't forget that the energy efficiency regulations will also ban the installation of gas central heating, where it is not already installed. So, don't go knocking storage heaters, because from 2016, those are going to be one of the few legal heating options.

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Don't forget that the energy efficiency regulations will also ban the installation of gas central heating, where it is not already installed. So, don't go knocking storage heaters, because from 2016, those are going to be one of the few legal heating options.

Does it ban oil fired central heating ?

Energy storage heaters or electricity based central heating is going to have to improve massively to be a cost effective alternative.

Thinking about it does it ban gas fires, if not then people will switch back. I personally hate night storage heaters as I don't like a home environment where I can't control the levels of heat instantly.

Edited by Ulfar

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Does it ban oil fired central heating ?

Energy storage heaters or electricity based central heating is going to have to improve massively to be a cost effective alternative.

Thinking about it does it ban gas fires, if not then people will switch back. I personally hate night storage heaters as I don't like a home environment where I can't control the levels of heat instantly.

We don't know for sure what is going to happen in 2016 as the law hasn't been written yet! There hasn't even been a proper consultation, but the government has made a binding commitment to the substantial carbon savings in "new or improved homes", by 2016.

It is widely expected that the banning of new gas central heating will be an essential part of the legislation (as without this, the target cannot be met), in favour of lower-carbon techniques such as heat pumps. For the same reason, it is highly likely that oil and non-biomass solid fuel will also be forced out.

Because it is all about carbon, storage heaters do surprisingly well, because they charge overnight, when a substantial proportion of grid power is low-carbon nuclear.

Edited by ChumpusRex

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Are the energy efficiency ratings actually scientific and provable or can the assessor (probably the EA/LA) just make most things, say, a C and therefore nobody actually gets stung by this?

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Are the energy efficiency ratings actually scientific and provable or can the assessor (probably the EA/LA) just make most things, say, a C and therefore nobody actually gets stung by this?

The efficiency ratings are calculated by a software package. It contains a database of a variety of home construction types, insulation types, appliance makes/models, heating control systems, etc.

You feed in a floor area, number of doors/windows, type of construction, type of insulation, whether there is double glazing, what type of double glazing, thickness of loft insulation, make/model of boiler, number of radiators, presence of thermostats, etc.

The computer then does some calculations based on the internal formulae and parameters of the various items.

All sounds good, except, stuff like cavity wall insulation is purely a guess by the assessor, they have no way of knowing if it is present or not. Similarly, they're not going to climb into the loft to measure the thickness, they're just going to guess. They are also unlikely to spot the difference between an ultra-high performance double glazed unit with double low-e glass and krypton fill, from your regular budget double glazed sealed unit. They're also not going to check for underfloor insulation, or correct operation of heating/control systems, just their presence, nor are they going to know if you have insulation backed plasterboard, or just regular plasterboard.

I've seen two neighbouring flats get a C and an F rating - the only difference being a better boiler in the C flat - but the main reason for the discrepancy was because of disagreement as to the insulation performance in the two flats - one rater likely overestimated the insulation, one likely underestimated it.

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We don't know for sure what is going to happen in 2016 as the law hasn't been written yet! There hasn't even been a proper consultation, but the government has made a binding commitment to the substantial carbon savings in "new or improved homes", by 2016.

It is widely expected that the banning of new gas central heating will be an essential part of the legislation (as without this, the target cannot be met), in favour of lower-carbon techniques such as heat pumps. For the same reason, it is highly likely that oil and non-biomass solid fuel will also be forced out.

Because it is all about carbon, storage heaters do surprisingly well, because they charge overnight, when a substantial proportion of grid power is low-carbon nuclear.

I can't see it happening, while night storage may be more environmentally friendly it is vastly more expensive for the consumer. The case for it being more environmentally friendly also needs to be looked at as you have nuclear waste and night storage doesn't factor in weather changes to usage level. Heat pumps are also a non-starter for the majority of people, especially if they have a new build house or flat.

Oil based heating systems shouldn't be ruled out as oil can be produced from plants it doesn't have to be conventional oil, gas also can be produced from biomass. Whether this is practical on a large scale is another issue.

It also doesn't address the fact that for water heating for things like showers immersion tanks are a disaster.

Edited by Ulfar

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I also notice the wording in the quote is 'ask for consent to make' improvements implying that the tenant would pay not the landlord!

Why can't a tenant ask now? surely everyone is permitted to ask today and if he is willing to pay then it should be music to the LL's ear.

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Why can't a tenant ask now? surely everyone is permitted to ask today and if he is willing to pay then it should be music to the LL's ear.

Why would any tenant make energy efficiency improvements when the payback periods on all of them are more than one year, never mind six months?

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Why would any tenant make energy efficiency improvements when the payback periods on all of them are more than one year, never mind six months?

No reason, especially with the current tenancy rights.

What next, do landlords want their bums wiped for them as well, maybe the governemnt and the central bank can rig that too.

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Thanks Chumpus, I've always wondered but it's very difficult to find info on the net. I assume that's to make it seem more sophisticated that it actually is. It sounds very much like a garbage in, garbage out system with inconsistent results. I've noticed when looking for rentals that flats in the same block can have wildly different ratings.

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who is going round doing all these "ratings"?

Is this a job opportunity?

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who is going round doing all these "ratings"?

Is this a job opportunity?

Many thought it was, I personally know two who went through all the cost of training up, neither of them made one net penny from it. There are other government gravy trains that have been very lucrative for those who joined though, bit of pot luck.

2016 and whatever regulations come about could be a pivotal year, it could muller the refurb market if they over legislate, making it unprofitable for regular builders and unaffordable for the client. In the meantime loads of work brought forward in order not to have to adhere to whatever comes in then. A bit fat wodge of extra spending and vat / tax before the election.

Edited by onlyme2

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Anyone know if it's possible to get an energy rating of E or above with single skin walls and single glazing?

My landlord better have a plan b in mind.

One of the few energy efficient measures worth doing by the tenant is secondary glazing film and draught excluding on old single glaze Windows, with or without permission.

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who is going round doing all these "ratings"?

Is this a job opportunity?

Seems to mainly just be the EAs/LAs that do it now.

Many thought it was, I personally know two who went through all the cost of training up, neither of them made one net penny from it. There are other government gravy trains that have been very lucrative for those who joined though, bit of pot luck.

It looked like it could be when HIPs were going to be a thing then all of that got rolled back into the watered down version we have now.

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