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Junk All Diesel Cars: They're A Health Hazard, So Scrap Them And Pay Owners £2,000, Boris Tells Mps


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Refineries split crude oil into various products: petrol, diesel, paraffin, tar. You can tweak the proportions, but only by a bit, and it costs.

So now a proportion of the diesel produced will be a waste product (no demand for it), and burnt off at the refinery.

Yep, great idea.

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Refineries split crude oil into various products: petrol, diesel, paraffin, tar. You can tweak the proportions, but only by a bit, and it costs.

So now a proportion of the diesel produced will be a waste product (no demand for it), and burnt off at the refinery.

Yep, great idea.

Uh, you might have noticed, but the diesel price is way above petrol. That's because there is TOO MUCH demand.

Diesel is noxious.

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Diesel passenger cars are a public health disaster in towns. Should be reserved for trucks only as commercial operators are more likely to take their maintenance obligations more seriously than the average punter. Saw a 63 plate Merc with a black plume emerging as the driver floored it at a junction recently. You just can't make a petrol car behave like that.

:blush: I hope that wasn't me.

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Diesel passenger cars are a public health disaster in towns. Should be reserved for trucks only as commercial operators are more likely to take their maintenance obligations more seriously than the average punter. Saw a 63 plate Merc with a black plume emerging as the driver floored it at a junction recently. You just can't make a petrol car behave like that.

There must have been something seriously wrong with his car, the new Mercedes diesels are very clean and efficient. In economy mode, which 99% of merc owners leave on all the time its impossible, it can't do the revs.

The real problem is commercial haulage, most of it's decades old technology. Boris really does spout some utter crap like building an airport in the foggiest part of Britain.

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There must have been something seriously wrong with his car, the new Mercedes diesels are very clean and efficient. In economy mode, which 99% of merc owners leave on all the time its impossible, it can't do the revs.

The real problem is commercial haulage, most of it's decades old technology. Boris really does spout some utter crap like building an airport in the foggiest part of Britain.

Wat :huh:

Commercial was the first to get common rail direct injection and they all seem to use the much better AdBlue system, and run at 55mph rather than 80mph, to be the first to sit in the next lot of traffic.

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There are so many things wrong with this that it defies belief.

Firstly, I don't believe the mortality numbers. Smoking apparently kills 100K people a year, figures for diesel pollution are between 20 and 40K. So we all ought to know someone who has died of diesel. I know lots of people who have died from smoking - cancer, heat attacks, you name it, all directly attributable to smoking. Never heard of anyone die of diesel. If this is all true, people should be dying like flies in central London, of diesel.

Now, loads of people will jump on the above and point out that if people have asthma, then diesel will make it worse. It probably will, but it was ever thus. People who lived in London and got TB were sent to cleaner places and recovered. My mate who had asthma and lived in London in the 70s was always better in the countryside, until he met our cat then all hell broke loose. Banning cats would probably be more helpful to asthmatics.

I used to cycle in London in the late 80s and it was properly filthy - Routemasters would fill entire streets with diesel fumes, you could taste it, you could see it, and your clothes stank of it. Presumably millions of people were dying of diesel in those days, I didn't know any of them either. The streets are far cleaner today.

Then you have the obsession with MPG driven by the government and their CO2 agenda. They taxed the hell out of anything that used lots of petrol, so people inevitably turn to more efficient engines. The consumers were stupid as well - yes the your new diesel has a £30 tax disk, but it comes with a £1500 turbo that you'll need to replace fairly frequently. And for an urban dweller (low mileage, short journeys) the cost of diesel maintenance far outweighs the fuel savings.

The car manufacturers loved it - diesel allows them to build big cars with reasonable MPG - driving a refresh of the nations fleet.

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The diesel car is finished now, in 10 years they will be pretty rare to see new ones. With the every tightning euro regulations the diesel is on borrowed time. The new euro 6 regs will kill the diesel as they now need ANOTHER expensive system which uses a chemical called adblu. The new passat has it and the system is flawed on so many levels on a passenger car it's a total joke.

All big manufacturers are rushing to get out the new breed of petrol engines. Ford predict the diesel will be extinct in the near future. They are working in extending the new 3 cylinder petrol into their range.

I doubt very much that Diesel will be gone any time soon. Diesel engines are inherently more efficient, due to higher compression ratios. Most manufacturers are meeting Euro 6 regs without too much trouble. Adblue is not really a very expensive system. It is basically piss that is sprayed into the exhaust gas to reduce NOx levels. Commercial vehicles have been using it for a while as it is a cheap way of reducing NOx levels. In passenger cars many manufacturers used more sophisticated ways to keep within Euro 4 and 5 regs without it, but now it seems to go further they need Adblue.

All manufacturers have to reduce their fleet average CO2 emissions. The easiest way to do that is still with diesel engines. Petrol engines are getting more efficient too, but to increase efficiency, higher compression ratios are needed which leads to higher temperatures which in turn leads to higher levels of NOx, which requires more controls on petrol engines too.

Modern diesels are very clean. The vast majority of the bad emissions will come from older diesel trucks, busses and other diesel powered equipment.

Edited by BalancedBear
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I doubt very much that Diesel will be gone any time soon. Diesel engines are inherently more efficient, due to higher compression ratios. Most manufacturers are meeting Euro 6 regs without too much trouble. Adblue is not really a very expensive system. It is basically piss that is sprayed into the exhaust gas to reduce NOx levels. Commercial vehicles have been using it for a while as it is a cheap way of reducing NOx levels. In passenger cars they have used more sophisticated ways to keep within Euro 4 and 5 regs without it, but now it seems to go further they need Adblue.

All manufacturers have to reduce their fleet average CO2 emissions. The easiest way to do that is still with diesel engines.

Smaller, lighter cars would do the job.

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Then you have the obsession with MPG driven by the government and their CO2 agenda. They taxed the hell out of anything that used lots of petrol, so people inevitably turn to more efficient engines. The consumers were stupid as well - yes the your new diesel has a £30 tax disk, but it comes with a £1500 turbo that you'll need to replace fairly frequently. And for an urban dweller (low mileage, short journeys) the cost of diesel maintenance far outweighs the fuel savings.

The car manufacturers loved it - diesel allows them to build big cars with reasonable MPG - driving a refresh of the nations fleet.

Most turbos actually last quite a long time. Many petrols are turbocharged to improve efficiency too.

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Smaller, lighter cars would do the job.

Well that has been happening anyway. However small cars do not suit everyone. They are fine for small single people, but not much else. Families will need larger cars, and even taller people cannot get comfortable in many small cars. All manufacturers are trying to reduce weight, but they have had to do that whilst complying with ever more stringent crash tests which require stronger body shells.

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All manufacturers have to reduce their fleet average CO2 emissions. The easiest way to do that is still with diesel engines. Petrol engines are getting more efficient too, but to increase efficiency, higher compression ratios are needed which leads to higher temperatures which in turn leads to higher levels of NOx, which requires more controls on petrol engines too.

Modern diesels are very clean. The vast majority of the bad emissions will come from older diesel trucks, busses and other diesel powered equipment.

How do you explain the modern diesels that you often see kicking out black smoke under acceleration? 'Clean' shouldn't be judged only on CO2 and NOx but on particulates as well.

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Wat :huh:

Commercial was the first to get common rail direct injection and they all seem to use the much better AdBlue system, and run at 55mph rather than 80mph, to be the first to sit in the next lot of traffic.

...

Modern diesels are very clean. The vast majority of the bad emissions will come from older diesel trucks, busses and other diesel powered equipment.

This.

There's a lot of old diesel vans and trucks on the roads. Quite a lot with Eastern European plates I have noticed.

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Diesel passenger cars are a public health disaster in towns. Should be reserved for trucks only as commercial operators are more likely to take their maintenance obligations more seriously than the average punter. Saw a 63 plate Merc with a black plume emerging as the driver floored it at a junction recently. You just can't make a petrol car behave like that.

No, its death gas is invisible

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A lot of people who do low mileage or mostly urban drivers were duped in buying diesels when they would have been better of buying petrol due to the expense of having a new DPF as low mileage town driving screws them up. Not doing enough miles to outweigh the cost of the more expensive diesels obviously too.

Of course if your are a low mileage urban diesel driver, you can always give the car a good run on a motorway or A road every coupe of weeks but that will chucking away the fuel you may saved in the previous 2 weeks.

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There must have been something seriously wrong with his car, the new Mercedes diesels are very clean and efficient. In economy mode, which 99% of merc owners leave on all the time its impossible, it can't do the revs.

The real problem is commercial haulage, most of it's decades old technology. Boris really does spout some utter crap like building an airport in the foggiest part of Britain.

Are you sure about that? I can rev my 63 plate c250cdi amg sport estate to the moon in economy mode.

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My derv car is worth less than £2k. If I lived in London I'd snap Boris's hand off. B)

Its is head that needs taking off, just shows how socialist the Tory party are when they use taxpayers money for another pointless pet project.

They really do not want to solve the deficit crisis, let alone the debt.

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