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justthisbloke

Urgent - Bread Recipes Needed!

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After over a decade of sterling service, my bread machine has popped its clogs.

Naturally, I'm too much of a bread-connoisseur to revert to factory bread. And, naturally, I'm too much of a skin-flint to buy a new bread machine.

So help me out here, tell me how to bake my own bread!

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Flour and yeast helps! Have you never been into a kitchen?

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Same thing happened to me. Used a breadmaker for a few years until it jumped off the kitchen sideboard while kneading and smashed itself to bits.

I basically followed the same breadmaker recipe proportions but did it all 'manually'.

3 cups of strong flour to 1.1 cup of water. Start with dissolving 2.5 spoons of sugar in the warm water with a spoon and a bit of yeast to activate for 20 mins. Then add the water mix to bread and knead. Add also 2 spoons of fat (butter or oil) and seeds (optional). Also possible to add 2 spoons of milk powder.

Cover with wet tea towel or slingfilm to keep heat. Leave to rise in warm place.

Push back(or whatever it is called)

Oven in cake tin for 20 minutes on high heat and bob's your uncle.

I could of course be doing it completely wrong.

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Trick to bread making is the water, and using "strong" flour.

More water == sloppier dough with a potential to rise more, think Ciabatta. For "ordinary" bread, use water at about 60% of the weight of flour, 70% is high and makes runny dough, maybe OK for baguettes if you have a baking mould for them, but the higher water doughs tend to collapse after rising.

Add a teaspoon of salt to the flour (strengthens the gluten, as well as adding to flavour).

1 teaspoon of dried yeast and a <pinch> of sugar or honey in the water, let the yeast get going - this "proves" the yeast, something I could never understand when recipes called for the dough to "prove". It proves the yeast is alive, that's all! Be aware that there are different yeasts for machines and hand making.

Mix flour to water + yeast with a wooden spoon until mostly incorporated, then add some oil, about a desert spoon - I use olive oil. Keep stirring until the dough is a ball. You could use butter, sunflower etc, or more oil, depends on what you want.

Now knead. This forms the gluten - basically making elastic stuff that holds the bread together. All you are doing is massaging the water right into the flour. The same thing can be done by leaving the dough overnight in a cool place (google no-knead bread). About 5 minutes is usually enough.

Unless you are using a tin, I find the best form is to roll out three sausages of dough and plait them. If left as a "mound" the dough tends to spread sideways. There is a way to shape loaves, but I haven't found the knack yet.

Leave to rise in a warm place - 40C is ideal, so a pre-heated oven works well. Takes a couple of hours. If in the open, cover with a damp towel (not in contact with the dough!). Inside an oven it is OK without. The dampness stops a hard dry skin forming, which would stop the rise.

Bake at 220C, 45 minutes, or according to weight/form. Obviously, flat breads like Naan bread or pizza bases are quicker, tin loaves take about 45 mins.

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OK, found a recipe on the internet and made it. Gosh, it's tasty. Am now making another one.

It was, however, a bit flat. Will work on CV's wateryness suggestion.

@Corevalue - that's really useful info.

About the (dried) yeast - do I need to set going in a jug first with water and honey/sugar? The recipes seem to suggest just dumping it in the bowl dry.

@Pinny - I know nothing of the mystery of the kitchen. The womenfolk of the household are responsible for the workings of that part of ship. I do gardens. (And bread).

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OK, found a recipe on the internet and made it. Gosh, it's tasty. Am now making another one.

It was, however, a bit flat. Will work on CV's wateryness suggestion.

@Corevalue - that's really useful info.

About the (dried) yeast - do I need to set going in a jug first with water and honey/sugar? The recipes seem to suggest just dumping it in the bowl dry.

@Pinny - I know nothing of the mystery of the kitchen. The womenfolk of the household are responsible for the workings of that part of ship. I do gardens. (And bread).

Your wife has "spoiled" you! Earn your kitchen knives! :blink: Be a "real" man cutting up animal body bits! Mr Pin's "bread recipe" is to slice it and fry it in lard, and put an egg on it! :wacko:

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OK, found a recipe on the internet and made it. Gosh, it's tasty. Am now making another one.

It was, however, a bit flat. Will work on CV's wateryness suggestion.

@Corevalue - that's really useful info.

About the (dried) yeast - do I need to set going in a jug first with water and honey/sugar? The recipes seem to suggest just dumping it in the bowl dry.

@Pinny - I know nothing of the mystery of the kitchen. The womenfolk of the household are responsible for the workings of that part of ship. I do gardens. (And bread).

It speeds the process up, it's not necessary. Using warm water to start with helps as well.

Try using spelt flour for real tastiness.

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Loaf Version 2.0 now complete - it looks even better than the first.

Mr Hovis (how apt), I'm finding the hand made stuff to be much better than the produce of the Panasonic. The ingredients of which always puzzled me a bit (including such things as olive oil, sugar and milk).

The recipe I've found is Paul Hollywood's easy white bread loaf. The only oddity is the inclusion of a bit of butter in the mix. Other than that it' just bread.

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I bought the Lidl one too. 35 quid for 850W and two paddles. The ones on Amazon start at about 50 quid for 600W. One Lidl wholewheat and rye loaf made so far, quite impressed. Burnt my finger taking a paddle out of the loaf though.

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I'm still following.the packet ingredients, so salt, sugar, butter.

There's a wire to hook the paddles out after the second knead, worked for me.

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Roughly about 250g of strong flour in a bowl. Then add about 1tsp salt and stir through. Taste the mix to check salt content. Too salty add some more flour. Add 7g quick yeast to dry mix. Have approx 150ml of cold water in a container. Add the water slowly to the dry mix until the mixture comes together. Gradually add smaller measuresa bit at a time.

Leave mix to rest for 15mins and then knead to smooth and elastic dough. Place dough in oiled bowl and cover and leave to rise until doubles in size. Knockback by punching the dough centre. Then shape and prove on baking sheet for about 30mins.

Pre heat oven to 220c. You really need steam in there to get the oven spring and the crust will not set Too quickly. I use a tray of boiling water. Bake the bread in top of oven until sounds hollow to tap.

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I'm still following.the packet ingredients, so salt, sugar, butter.

There's a wire to hook the paddles out after the second knead, worked for me.

the professionals also use a very small pinch of baking powder and a crushed vitamin C tablet.

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