Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
Sign in to follow this  
Trampa501

Entrepreneurial Britain?

Recommended Posts

Well it seems that (in contrast to other European countries) the richest person in Britain is the Duke of Westminster, a landlord.

Not a shock really.

18477-1qztgaq.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It says it all really, what has happened to our once great country, the bringers of the industrial revolution who modernised the world, who sacrificed our best and brightest in battle to maintain the freedoms of generations to come, to become slaves of landlords in our own lands and reduced to scrapping in the dirt for the scraps the political elite and 1% care to throw at us. A land where the vested interest of the "ruling" classes and corrupt public servants are considered above those who are the most vulnerable and in the direst need. How have we allowed this to happen?

Edited by JustAnotherProle

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the Duke of Westminster is hiding much of his wealth too. In 1989, the rich list said he was worth 3.2 billion pounds, now they say 8.5 billion pounds, a multiple of 2.6. However prime london properties have gone up by about 6 or 7 times, meaning he should be worth about 20 billion pounds, not counting the rent he would have received.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm trying to think (and there must be some) British enterprises that have emerged world wide in the last 50 years. Along the lines of Ikea or Zara or Lidl - obviously we don't have the Apple, Google or Amazon slots, but we must have some Brit new companies that expanded worldwide? I can only think of Irish successes like Ryanair and Primark -- although yes, Easyjet isn't doing too bad currently come to think about it.

Edit: Just remembered - Dyson - that's done well overseas hasn't it?

Edited by Trampa501

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Property & land is different wealth too in the UK isn't it?

It is especially protected by statute (planning) and is easier to leverage than other asset classes

So £10bn in cash / shares is very different to £10bn in land and property and, in the UK as things are at the moment, the land & property fortune is probably more valuable than the cash / shares fortune, even if their valuations are the same at this moment in time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Property & land is different wealth too in the UK isn't it?

It is especially protected by statute (planning) and is easier to leverage than other asset classes

So £10bn in cash / shares is very different to £10bn in land and property and, in the UK as things are at the moment, the land & property fortune is probably more valuable than the cash / shares fortune, even if their valuations are the same at this moment in time.

By that argument, land/property are undervalued, and you should be investing all your wealth there.

Meanwhile the income from £100k invested in UK small biz is paying my rent on a £200k house.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm trying to think (and there must be some) British enterprises that have emerged world wide in the last 50 years. Along the lines of Ikea or Zara or Lidl - obviously we don't have the Apple, Google or Amazon slots, but we must have some Brit new companies that expanded worldwide? I can only think of Irish successes like Ryanair and Primark -- although yes, Easyjet isn't doing too bad currently come to think about it.

Edit: Just remembered - Dyson - that's done well overseas hasn't it?

Yep, there are quite a few, including household names. Funny you should mention a subsidiary of Associated British Foods as Irish!

Though I'd say Dyson's claim to Britishness is rather dubious.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The problem is 1 single person can create the next big thing. Sadly this country would rather keep peoples cash reserves and future earnings at 0, in the smallest hovels possible.

Many Countries will lead the way, the UK will not be one of them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Meanwhile the income from £100k invested in UK small biz is paying my rent on a £200k house.

I'd be seriously interested in hearing what you've invested in and how you've gone about it.

How high is the risk in these investments?

Thanks for any information you're able to provide.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd be seriously interested in hearing what you've invested in and how you've gone about it.

How high is the risk in these investments?

Thanks for any information you're able to provide.

The income-producing portfolio is Venture Capital Trusts (other investments being wrapped in tax-shelters, the SIPP and ISA, where any income stays). I add some each year, and last year - being my fifth year of investing - the year's income from them first exceeded the year's rent. I'm also starting to recycle some of them, with a view to eggs-and-baskets considerations.

The risk varies a lot: some are genuinely high risk, others appear low-risk. A few have lost me money, but most of them are doing OK-to-nicely. If a big downturn hits small biz the portfolio and particularly the income will take a hit. Most VCTs got slaughtered in 2008/9; a few sailed serenely through. Most of those that got slaughtered bounced back; a few have crumbled since then.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Property & land is different wealth too in the UK isn't it?

It is especially protected by statute (planning) and is easier to leverage than other asset classes

So £10bn in cash / shares is very different to £10bn in land and property and, in the UK as things are at the moment, the land & property fortune is probably more valuable than the cash / shares fortune, even if their valuations are the same at this moment in time.

lots of odd aspects to property law in the England

As far as i am aware it is the only country in europe were people can own riverbeds. for example, the avon past stratford is easily navigable, but it would be trespassing on the landowners land to attempt to do so.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm trying to think (and there must be some) British enterprises that have emerged world wide in the last 50 years. Along the lines of Ikea or Zara or Lidl - obviously we don't have the Apple, Google or Amazon slots, but we must have some Brit new companies that expanded worldwide?

ARM powers a large fraction of all the computing devices in the world.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ARM powers a large fraction of all the computing devices in the world.

It's not just ARM, whose licensees' technology indeed powers many times more computers than Intel's. Britain leads the world in semiconductor design, with the likes of IMG and even CSR as a solid next-tier after ARM.

If you're going to list Lidl, then by the same token you should list much bigger UK global retailers, like Tesco or M&S. Yes, they all (including Lidl) go back a lot further than the OP's 50 years, but not as international giants.

Edited by porca misèria

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a free entrepreneurial idea.

Just do a zoopla or rightmove search around Threadneedle street. Buy a house and wait.

Ah I see other people have beat me to it....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm trying to think (and there must be some) British enterprises that have emerged world wide in the last 50 years. Along the lines of Ikea or Zara or Lidl - obviously we don't have the Apple, Google or Amazon slots, but we must have some Brit new companies that expanded worldwide? I can only think of Irish successes like Ryanair and Primark -- although yes, Easyjet isn't doing too bad currently come to think about it.

Edit: Just remembered - Dyson - that's done well overseas hasn't it?

JCB could certainly be considered one of the very few genuine British success stories over the last 50 years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ARM powers a large fraction of all the computing devices in the world.

Indeed, and remember that Dolby still rake in the license fees feeding the Milton Keynes economy.

The idea that heavy industry has ceased to exist is utter rubbish, it just does not (often) belch smoke and fire any more. If you don't believe me take a look at the data centres in Docklands, Slough and south of the Thames at Chessington. We are talking about megawatts of power being fed into buildings and it all ends up as heat once the network packets have been shovelled down the fibre optics that span the globe. When you see a switch with 8 x 16amp power leads in a 19" rack and hear the 120dB scream of the fans you know that the modern blast furnaces driving the economy sit in London not Scunthorpe. These monsters are why London is the 8th largest economy in the world.

BTW the biggest limiting factor for the roll out of FTTC is that every street DSLAM (new green BT box made in China) has to be powered as it is no longer a passive connection splicing box - go and listen, they hum.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ARM powers a large fraction of all the computing devices in the world.

Looking at their history indeed they do. Interesting that they were set up as a joint venture between Acorn and Apple and someone called VLSI. Not that that takes away any of their success, quite the reverse, but my point was where are the leading world startup brands from the last 50 years that you can put down to one or two individuals? If we go back far enough we do see the likes of Tesco, Marks +Spencer, Rolls Royce etc. And in more recent times from other countries we have Microsoft, Apple, Amazon, Ikea, Lidl, Zara, Ryanair etc. Richard Branson?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd be seriously interested in hearing what you've invested in and how you've gone about it.

How high is the risk in these investments?

Thanks for any information you're able to provide.

As I remember it - unless I'm confusing it with someone else's position - something about smaller venture-capital investments, returns, and tax-relief on such investments.

I'm not informed about the risks involved, especially when I don't know the investments themselves.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm trying to think (and there must be some) British enterprises that have emerged world wide in the last 50 years. Along the lines of Ikea or Zara or Lidl - obviously we don't have the Apple, Google or Amazon slots, but we must have some Brit new companies that expanded worldwide? I can only think of Irish successes like Ryanair and Primark -- although yes, Easyjet isn't doing too bad currently come to think about it.

Edit: Just remembered - Dyson - that's done well overseas hasn't it?

ARM. But the rest of the 'knowledge economy' failed to materialise.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ARM. But the rest of the 'knowledge economy' failed to materialise.

That might be true nationally but around ARM in Cambridge there are hundreds of "knowledge" companies.

However as a nation I think we do create companies but we are very quick to sell out to competitors. Take Cambridge Anitbody Technology which was a spin-off from the Medical Research Council but is now part of Astra Zeneca.

I'd personally favour pumping billions into our research councils and then spinning off the companies as a UK industrial policy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Indeed, and remember that Dolby still rake in the license fees feeding the Milton Keynes economy.

The idea that heavy industry has ceased to exist is utter rubbish, it just does not (often) belch smoke and fire any more. If you don't believe me take a look at the data centres in Docklands, Slough and south of the Thames at Chessington. We are talking about megawatts of power being fed into buildings and it all ends up as heat once the network packets have been shovelled down the fibre optics that span the globe. When you see a switch with 8 x 16amp power leads in a 19" rack and hear the 120dB scream of the fans you know that the modern blast furnaces driving the economy sit in London not Scunthorpe. These monsters are why London is the 8th largest economy in the world.

BTW the biggest limiting factor for the roll out of FTTC is that every street DSLAM (new green BT box made in China) has to be powered as it is no longer a passive connection splicing box - go and listen, they hum.

Good post, appealed to my techy and sparky sides.

Although I'd just wire the cabinets to the nearest lamp post :ph34r:

Don't judge me

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • The Prime Minister stated that there were three Brexit options available to the UK:   217 members have voted

    1. 1. Which of the Prime Minister's options would you choose?


      • Leave with the negotiated deal
      • Remain
      • Leave with no deal

    Please sign in or register to vote in this poll. View topic


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.