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classixuk

Can You Please Help Me Guys

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Moderators, I know this has very little to do with housing, but I need an answer to this question tonight and more people who may be able to answer will see this on the main board. Please can you leave it up until I get the answer. It's really important!

Can anyone help me? I've googled down to my knuckles and can't find the answer to this question.

Before the youth training scheme was introduced in 1983, what did UK school leavers at 16 do or have the choice of doing?

Say for example a boy who left school at 16 in 1978. What were his options and or incentives to enter workplace learning...did the schemes back then have a name and how did they work?

It's really important that I find this out before Monday morning at the latest.

Thankyou for all your help.

Classixuk.

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Didn't they just have apprenticships?

God, I hated YTS.

I am sorry that I can't help, but if Libby is right then that explains the apalling quality of younger trades people in this country. I remember the apprenticeship system. Training solid as a rock. Took 3-4 years on the job before you could call yourself part of the trade and work independantly. And if you got your car serviced, the mechanic would actually be able to diagnose what problems there were (I know personally of one instance of a "mechanics" who have serviced a car that was blowing smoke and heating at over 60K gave it a clean bill of health and then told the people that it was their fault when the engine blew up two weeks later because they didn't diagnose the problem)

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I Left School in 1980 and it was either A Levels or work (Unskilled or Apprenticeship) The Government did have some joint industry training schools that you could get sponsored into a an apprenticeship, but these were very limited)

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Youth Opportunities Programme I think..

My problem on leaving school was it was impossible to find a proper job as the employers only wanted to pay peanuts (and you know what you get for that) so only employed YTS. I was lucky though in that I got to do a job I loved, which generally wasn't very well paid anyway :rolleyes:

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Guest muttley

I was 16 in 1978,and there were lots of school leavers went into apprenticeships.My brother joined the police cadets at 16.There were also more unskilled factory jobs about.

The rest of us just went down t'pit. (Even the girls)

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There wasn't anything. YTS and YOP - Youth Opportunities Programme - were a direct result of the Thatcher years and the surge in unemployment to an OFFICIAL SIX MILLION unemployed. They later introduced Community Programme for older unemployed. Many of us are still playing catch-up for the Thatcher years.

I hope a big, nasty spider bites the Thatcher spawn in the jungle live on TV!

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Before the youth training scheme was introduced in 1983, what did UK school leavers at 16 do or have the choice of doing?

Libitina is right, there certainly were apprenticeships. I witnessed a proper full apprenticeship scheme being disbanded in order to gain a few sheckels from the YTS, I suspect this probably wasn't the only example. Funny how companies nowadays complain of skills shortgages when they themselves are unwilling in many cases to offer any sort of training.

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i left school in 1986, and i can tell you now unemployment was massive with most of it concentrating in the north and scotland.

i ledft school into one of the main areas of unemployment and a good estimate was 50% unemployment, with the rest on a pittance of wages, just like housing the unemployment affected diffrent areas, i remember wales, glasgow and newcastle and liverpool as being the very worst affected.

i got onto a yts and my pay was 25 pounds a week, quite frankly i starved, just couldnt live on that at all, not only that but you were doing a hard weeks graft for it.people unemployed got more money.

Thatcher was hated like ive never seen in scotland, utter total hatred, and to this day the tories havent a chance in scotland i think there still aint a conservative mp for scotland at all.and perhaps why the lib dems get a decent vote there as there the one everyone that dont vote labour goes for.I cant see the tories ever getting back in my lifetime.

the YOP sceme was the fore-runner of the yts i think the diffrence was that the yts was brought out to encourage employers to take on the youth in training, as companies in the reccession were not, with the yts the government paid your wages, and you college bills, with the yop scheme i think the employer paid your wages and the government paid your college.

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Before the youth training scheme was introduced in 1983, what did UK school leavers at 16 do or have the choice of doing?

Funny how companies nowadays complain of skills shortgages when they themselves are unwilling in many cases to offer any sort of training.

Yes very funny, Oil Industry is taking it in the Ass at the moment due to the farcical level of training offered in the late 80's and all through the 90's both at graduate level and below.

Expect Piper Alpha 2 (*BOOOOOM!) with knobs and whistles on any day now........................ who though? could it be BP? Shell? or perhaps one of the newcomers who bought the mature (worn out poorly maintained) assets of the big boys? Not if but when.

Its a dangerous industry with a whole new generation of amateur engineers and managers replacing all the knowledgeable Grey hair who have departed.

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Guest Charlie The Tramp

Its a dangerous industry with a whole new generation of amateur engineers and managers replacing all the knowledgeable Grey hair who have departed.

Same with the Utilities, in comes privatisation and out go the grey haired highly knowledgeable on early forced retirement, and guess what many are brought back as sub contractors at 3x their leaving salary plus their pensions. I bet a few felt they had won the lottery :D

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Ok, thanks for the swift replies everyone and thanks to the moderators for allowing me the time to get the answer.

So, in 1978 there was no programme available where you could work but receive benefits etc?

Also, what age did you have to be to qualify for YTS when it was introduced i.e. was it just for 16 year old school leavers or was it for say 16-25 year old unemployed?

Thanks, and i'll check out the links provided in the answers.

You've been a big help everyone!

EDIT: I followed the link and found this:

1978

Youth Opportunities Programme introduced for 16-18 year-olds, allowance paid of £19.50 per week (described as a ‘new deal for the young unemployed’ by Albert Booth, Secretary of State for Employment in Labour Government).

Does anyone know if this benefit was paid to people who went into work or apprenticeships on top of their wage or those who were looking for work?

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Ok, thanks for the swift replies everyone and thanks to the moderators for allowing me the time to get the answer.

So, in 1978 there was no programme available where you could work but receive benefits etc?

Also, what age did you have to be to qualify for YTS when it was introduced i.e. was it just for 16 year old school leavers or was it for say 16-25 year old unemployed?

Thanks, and i'll check out the links provided in the answers.

You've been a big help everyone!

classixuk. Just one thing. Don't forget the demise of the apprenticeship. I am not sure about this country but in Oz the pay was set so that it didn't take account of the time spent in formal study. So in effect it WAS subsidised. Not by the government but by the idea of part-time work, part time training.

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Hurrah! I found what I was looking for!

It was only armed with the info you guys have given me and good old Google.

Thanks so much again.

And just for the record the answer is:

Youth Opportunities Programme (YOP) - ran from April 1978 to September 1983 when

it was replaced by the Youth Training Scheme. It provided a programme of up to 12 months

work experience and training for unemployed school leavers aged 16-18. A weekly

allowance was paid of £19.50.

:)

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Guest magnoliawalls

Funny how companies nowadays complain of skills shortgages when they themselves are unwilling in many cases to offer any sort of training.

Why pay for the training when it is cheaper to import or outsource the skilled personnel as and when needed?

A weekly

allowance was paid of £19.50.

Stupid question, but would that have been enough to live on back then? Say if you could not rely on the support of your family.

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Hurrah! I found what I was looking for!

It was only armed with the info you guys have given me and good old Google.

Thanks so much again.

And just for the record the answer is:

Youth Opportunities Programme (YOP) - ran from April 1978 to September 1983 when

it was replaced by the Youth Training Scheme. It provided a programme of up to 12 months

work experience and training for unemployed school leavers aged 16-18. A weekly

allowance was paid of £19.50.

Sheesh, hard times, it seems there are greater 'opportunities for success' thesedays, for example according to a Joseph Rowntree Foundation report this week 14 year olds can earn up to £450 per week as junior drug runners!

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Why pay for the training when it is cheaper to import or outsource the skilled personnel as and when needed?

Stupid question, but would that have been enough to live on back then? Say if you could not rely on the support of your family.

No, it wasn't. I lived at home and had to pay £10pw board. It also cost me approx £10 pw for a bus pass. That gave me the grand total of about £4 per week for myself. (1986 onwards). In my second year, I think it went up to about £27pw.Wooo! :rolleyes:

Classix, this money was paid INSTEAD of a wage, not on top of it. As was mentioned before, it was cheaper for the government and the employers too.

What did you need the info for as a matter of interest?

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I am sorry that I can't help, but if Libby is right then that explains the apalling quality of younger trades people in this country. I remember the apprenticeship system. Training solid as a rock. Took 3-4 years on the job before you could call yourself part of the trade and work independantly. And if you got your car serviced, the mechanic would actually be able to diagnose what problems there were (I know personally of one instance of a "mechanics" who have serviced a car that was blowing smoke and heating at over 60K gave it a clean bill of health and then told the people that it was their fault when the engine blew up two weeks later because they didn't diagnose the problem)

20 years ago, cars were very simple indeed. The diagnostic skills required were minimal.

Today cars are very different. For instance, the new Vauxhall Vectra can have up to 50 computers on-board, controlling tasks such as switching on headlights or indicators, a system known as multiplexing or CAN-bus.

Today's trainee mechanic has no idea what he/she is letting themselves in for. Training does not stop after the apprenticeship, it's ongoing. To be any good you have to put your heart and soul into it. The level of software, information, wiring diagrams, tools etc means heavy investment, mentally and financially.

Now, the average 18 year old trainee mechanic is IMO useless and has no aptitude for the job ( I think they just like the idea of it). No one of any intelligence would want to learn how to work on modern cars. It's a $hit job and almost as if the manufacturers are trying to punish mechanics. So you have a trade full of under motivated, confused, poorly trained personnel. This is why the average garage mechanic is a total Muppet.

95% of car owners have no idea just how difficult and time consuming fault diagnosis can be, they have no idea what goes on under the bonnet, the attitude of 'do you know whats wrong with it' as soon the bonnet's opened. This adds to the frustration the mechanic already feels and increases the pressure on him to make a decision on the fault quickly. This leads to incorrect diagnosis and can result with engines going bang.

"I know personally of one instance of a "mechanics" who have serviced a car that was blowing smoke and heating at over 60K gave it a clean bill of health and then told the people that it was their fault when the engine blew up two weeks later because they didn't diagnose the problem"

My advice to you. Next time you or someone you know has a problem with a car, scratch the surface and try and diagnose it for yourself. See how you get on.

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No, it wasn't. I lived at home and had to pay £10pw board. It also cost me approx £10 pw for a bus pass. That gave me the grand total of about £4 per week for myself. (1986 onwards). In my second year, I think it went up to about £27pw.Wooo! :rolleyes:

Classix, this money was paid INSTEAD of a wage, not on top of it. As was mentioned before, it was cheaper for the government and the employers too.

What did you need the info for as a matter of interest?

Hi Libitina,

Rememeber I told you that my partner was in a court case over property he bought with his brother back in 1990/91? It's for that.

My partner has been recounting his work history for me to include in his witness statement.

He remembered getting money off the social when he first left school at 16 but he was working in the family business too. He said it was like YTS money and most kids in Liverpool who were working got it. I knew YTS was an 80s thing and that's why I needed to know the name of the scheme!

Thanks.

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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