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Curry Lovers Thread

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I don't recall seeing a thread on curry, and it strikes me that on a forum populated by generally discerning punters we might have a few curry lovers amongst us.

After many years of eating roughly one curry a week and having tasted lots of styles and dishes from various parts of the country I've set out on trying to make my own BIR style curry. Results so far have been OK. The problem I have is that I shy away from adding the reccomended amounts of oil, and I've come to the conclusion that the key to replicating what you get in restaurants is just that - oil and lots of it.

I really like the medium hot dishes, just on the cusp of being too hot for me. Just shy of Madras strength, but generally I Iike most dishes. The only Indian meal I've never finished is the 'hottest curry in the world' at the Rupali in Newcastle, which made me feel like my head was on fire and left me resting my head on the table covered in a wet teatowel . At the minute I'm most partial to a pathia. The heat and sweet and sour flavours really hit the spot for me.

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I've seen that. The Glasgow base is verging on legendary based on my research so far. But that recipe proves my point: 500ml of oil for 4kg of onions!

OK that is a fair bit, but sure that could be dropped a bit and the amount of base used is not always that great in each dish. Although the separation of the oil is one of the common indicators that the dish is cooked.

Also another common theme - before adding the base / spices / meat / veg. First hot oil and then fried fresh garlic / ginger pastes, often with fenugreek.

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Love a good curry.

Once upon a time I hated curry. That was when all I'd experienced was the school meal and English pub curry of yesteryear. Then I finally went to a genuine Indian restaurant, where I encountered good food in the form of a curry, and I've never looked back. Though curry has grown yet more interesting as I learned to cook it (and variants) myself, and started to encounter yet more delicious variants like Thai curries.

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OK that is a fair bit, but sure that could be dropped a bit and the amount of base used is not always that great in each dish. Although the separation of the oil is one of the common indicators that the dish is cooked.

Also another common theme - before adding the base / spices / meat / veg. First hot oil and then fried fresh garlic / ginger pastes, often with fenugreek.

That's one of the things that interests me about the Glasgow base - the spices aren't pre fried, which I'd previously thought to be essential. I'm guessing that that's the reason for 500ml of oil: there has to be enough to extract the flavours from the spices, which are lipophilic.

I do my base differently to that, based on another recipe I found on thecurryguy.net, but slightly modified:

Fry 3 very large onions slowly (about 20 minutes) in 6 tbsp of oil (thinking about it, proportionally I've probably got a similar amount of oil in my base to the Glasgow 4k)

Add half a red pepper and half a carrot finely chopped

Add 2 tsp each of minced ginger and garlic, along with the spice mix and fry the giner/garlic/spices for about a minute

Add 1 can of chopped tomatoes and 400 ml of water

simmer for about half an hour then blend

The spice mix I use is 1 tsp of: cumin, coriander, fenugreek, smoked paprika, garam masala

0.5 tsp turmeric

Based on what I've read about consistency and how it should taste (balanced and moreish, and my base is incredibly moreish) I think the base tastes right. But I'm finding the leap between making a good curry (which this makes) and replicating what I get from our local takeaway difficult.

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Love a good curry.

Once upon a time I hated curry. That was when all I'd experienced was the school meal and English pub curry of yesteryear. Then I finally went to a genuine Indian restaurant, where I encountered good food in the form of a curry, and I've never looked back. Though curry has grown yet more interesting as I learned to cook it (and variants) myself, and started to encounter yet more delicious variants like Thai curries.

I can't get along with Thai curry for some reason. But Indians I could eat every day of the week.

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That's one of the things that interests me about the Glasgow base - the spices aren't pre fried, which I'd previously thought to be essential. I'm guessing that that's the reason for 500ml of oil: there has to be enough to extract the flavours from the spices, which are lipophilic.

I do my base differently to that, based on another recipe I found on thecurryguy.net, but slightly modified:

Fry 3 very large onions slowly (about 20 minutes) in 6 tbsp of oil (thinking about it, proportionally I've probably got a similar amount of oil in my base to the Glasgow 4k)

Add half a red pepper and half a carrot finely chopped

Add 2 tsp each of minced ginger and garlic, along with the spice mix and fry the giner/garlic/spices for about a minute

Add 1 can of chopped tomatoes and 400 ml of water

simmer for about half an hour then blend

The spice mix I use is 1 tsp of: cumin, coriander, fenugreek, smoked paprika, garam masala

0.5 tsp turmeric

Based on what I've read about consistency and how it should taste (balanced and moreish, and my base is incredibly moreish) I think the base tastes right. But I'm finding the leap between making a good curry (which this makes) and replicating what I get from our local takeaway difficult.

I noticed a big difference with starting off with the fresh ginger / garlic / fenugreek starter mix. Think a lot of the skill is how long to keep the high heat on the spices when there is just the oil/ghee in the pan beore adding the rest of the ingredients for cooking.

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I noticed a big difference with starting off with the fresh ginger / garlic / fenugreek starter mix. Think a lot of the skill is how long to keep the high heat on the spices when there is just the oil/ghee in the pan beore adding the rest of the ingredients for cooking.

I agree with that, and I think it's something I still have to learn. The fying technique on the garlic/ginger/spices, particularly when you make the final curry is critical.

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Man I love a curry. I think it is the perfect food.

Had a chicken ceylon today, it was lush.

Can barely boil an egg though so can't comment on the making of curries, though the wife has learned how to make one from scratch and she's very good at it.

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i've watched at least 10 of the those "curry base" videos on youTube. most are badly made -- eg. all steps not illustrated or something essential and unexplained introduced at the end etc, this is the most complete and plausible one I've found so far (caveat- I've not tried it yet!):

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I've just recently got into Rendang, which originates in Indonesia. Particularly with beef. I haven't attempted to make one from scratch yet - just using rendang paste.

Like many on this thread, I have a curry meal at least once a week but could eat it every day. Is it addictive, I wonder?

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I've just recently got into Rendang, which originates in Indonesia. Particularly with beef. I haven't attempted to make one from scratch yet - just using rendang paste.

Like many on this thread, I have a curry meal at least once a week but could eat it every day. Is it addictive, I wonder?

I went to Pakistan a few years back! It was crap being in the desert, but I sure stank of curry when I came back!

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i've watched at least 10 of the those "curry base" videos on youTube. most are badly made -- eg. all steps not illustrated or something essential and unexplained introduced at the end etc, this is the most complete and plausible one I've found so far (caveat- I've not tried it yet!):

Thanks. I'll have to give that--and his curry videos--a try at some point.

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I've just recently got into Rendang, which originates in Indonesia. Particularly with beef. I haven't attempted to make one from scratch yet - just using rendang paste.

Like many on this thread, I have a curry meal at least once a week but could eat it every day. Is it addictive, I wonder?

Where have you found that?

I don't recollect encountering Indonesian cuisine in Blighty, but I've enjoyed it a elsewhere (Amsterdam is a nearby hotbed of it).

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The bizarre thing is I was going to post here asking if anyone knew how to make a proper Indian restaurant type curry but thought that would be obscure even for this forum...

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But that recipe proves my point: 500ml of oil for 4kg of onions!

That's one of the things that interests me about the Glasgow base - the spices aren't pre fried, which I'd previously thought to be essential. I'm guessing that that's the reason for 500ml of oil: there has to be enough to extract the flavours from the spices, which are lipophilic.

If you're worried about calories use coconut oil! Long story short it's an MCT fat and will do nothing except rev up your metabolism.

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Ghee ghee and more ghee. Make most of it one day - slow cooked lamb is my favourite - then in the fridge for a few days - then finish off in the oven with the final ingredients. Sublime.

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Went to a really good chilly fest the other day......everything hot.

Reminded me of a works do once, went out for a meal in a pub style restaurant, the food was fairly tame English style. An Indian friend brought their own bottle of hot chilly sauce and covered their dish with it.....that led me to think the more hot food you eat, the hotter to need to keep getting or else your food starts to taste bland, l think that goes for other things also include salt.

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Went to a really good chilly fest the other day......everything hot.

Reminded me of a works do once, went out for a meal in a pub style restaurant, the food was fairly tame English style. An Indian friend brought their own bottle of hot chilly sauce and covered their dish with it.....that led me to think the more hot food you eat, the hotter to need to keep getting or else your food starts to taste bland, l think that goes for other things also include salt.

I think my friend destroyed his taste buds eating hotter and hotter curries. Now mild things have no taste to him.

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Ghee ghee and more ghee. Make most of it one day - slow cooked lamb is my favourite - then in the fridge for a few days - then finish off in the oven with the final ingredients. Sublime.

Was just reading this thread thinking why on earth is everyone talking about oil? I'm fortunate to,have had a few Indian friends who have both cooked for me and gave me 'home' recipes and they usually start with a tonne of onions in GHEE, not oil.

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Was just reading this thread thinking why on earth is everyone talking about oil? I'm fortunate to,have had a few Indian friends who have both cooked for me and gave me 'home' recipes and they usually start with a tonne of onions in GHEE, not oil.

Oil cheaper than ghee, the indian retaurants thus use the cheaper local ingredients - no doubt extends to other spices heavily too, beig used in their ground or dried form. BIR curry recipes hence predominantly oil based and not ghee.

So home or authentic curries - different kettle of fish.

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Any interesting thread. Coincidentally,I was moaning about the poor quality of supermarket and take-out curries on the things that are unbelievably crap thread.

http://www.housepricecrash.co.uk/forum/index.php?/topic/200085-unbelievably-crap-things/?p=1102563688

I've had a go at making scratch curries in the past and it didn't end well. However, I now have more time and less money to spend on take outs so I guess it's time to start again. Anyone attempted a Madras ? I don't want to make gallons of the stuff but I can understand why it makes sense to do so, Also any tips on sourcing the ingredients ?

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Oil cheaper than ghee, the indian retaurants thus use the cheaper local ingredients - no doubt extends to other spices heavily too, beig used in their ground or dried form. BIR curry recipes hence predominantly oil based and not ghee.

So home or authentic curries - different kettle of fish.

Aye, people sometimes don't get it, but there are many of us seeking the secrets of how to make takeaway curries not authentic ones - and industrial quantities of vegetable oil and onions are essential if that is your goal.

It's taken me over twenty years, but I can now cook a chicken madras and mushroom pilau you'd swear came from a takeaway.

Started off with Pat Chapman's books, but as tasty as they were, they weren't BIR.

Then around 8 years ago, a friend recommend a book called The Curry Secret by Kris Dhillon - and this got me close. Best £3.99 I ever spent.

I then started messing around with base sauces other than Dhillon's, and have found the site linked below to be a godsend for tips and alternative base gravies - their method is similar to Dhillon's and produces excellent results.

http://thecurrysauce.com

That Glasgow one looks worth a try - might give it a go for my next batch of base sauce...!

XYY

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