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zugzwang

Britain's Biggest Fare Dodger Unmasked!

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A City high-flyer who is thought to be Britain’s biggest fare dodger after avoiding paying £43,000 in train tickets on his daily commute has finally been unmasked.

Investment executive Jonathan Burrows, 44, had hoped to keep his name out of the public eye and avoid prosecution by quickly reimbursing Southeastern trains the full amount in unpaid tickets, accrued over five years, within three days of being caught.

Mr Burrows hit the headlines in April as the then unnamed man who was caught by a ticket inspector swiping through the ticket barriers with his pre-paid Oyster travel card last November, failing to pay the full £21.50 rail fare on his daily commute from his East Sussex home to London.

The inspector discovered that Mr Burrows, who has two country mansions worth £4 million and a salary of up to £1 million, had been charged only £7.20, the penalty imposed when a passenger fails to tap in their Oyster card at the start of a journey.

The married father of one admitted that he had not used his Oyster card to tap in for five journeys between London Bridge, where he got off his train from East Sussex, and Cannon Street, which should have cost him just £2.30 a time.

It then emerged that Mr Burrows had been buying an annual season ticket until 2008 from Stonegate, which has no ticket barriers, to Cannon Street, which costs around £4,500 a year for standard class. A standard daily single fare is £21.50.

But he had then stopped buying season tickets, and only paid £7.20 for the brief final leg of his long train journey.

Mr Burrows thought that by promptly paying Southeastern trains the £42,550 he owed them in unpaid fares, plus £450 in legal costs, he could keep his name secret.

But when the story emerged in April, provoking anger that Southeastern had allowed Mr Burrows to quietly settle the matter without being prosecuted, British Transport Police contacted the rail firm and began a criminal investigation, the Daily Mail reported.

Mr Burrows is understood to have told Southeastern that he hoped to prevent his name from emerging because the scandal could have an impact on his job at asset management firm BlackRock.

The news also came to the attention of City watchdog the Financial Conduct Authority, with which Mr Burrows was registered. The FCA started its own investigation over concerns that his actions showed a lack of probity that could make him unsuitable for City work.

But last week, Mr Burrows warned his bosses, who knew nothing of his fare-dodging, that they might be receiving a call from the regulator. He was suspended from his job as a managing director, and he then resigned after refusing to go into any more detail about the fare-dodging.

His resignation meant that the FCA investigation was brought to an end, but it means he is unlikely to be able to work in finance again.

A City source reportedly told the Mail that last week Mr Burrows suddenly told his bosses that "the FCA might give you a call".

“He only let slip in passing that it was about this £40,000 fare-dodging payment,” he told the paper.

“They suspended him immediately, but he refused to explain anything at all about the fare-dodging - and when more questions were asked he resigned without a payoff.”

Mr Burrows owns two mortgage-free mansions in the East Sussex countryside: a £1 million house near Wadhurst and his home, which has acres of landscaped grounds, ponds and a tennis court, near the village of Stonegate, which he bought for £2.725 million in 2011.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/11007691/Unmasked-at-last-the-City-high-flyer-who-dodged-43000-in-train-fares.html

A lack of probity that could make him unsuitable for City work? Bumper bonus and trebles all round, surely?

1406934257243_wps_9_From_Jamie_Wiseman_1

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I guess if you make enough money it's easy to slip into the mindset that the rules are only for the 'little' people. And he very nearly pulled it off too.

Ironic that had his activities involved a scam worth millions of pounds he almost certainly would have kept his job and earned a bonus for his trouble- so the moral of the story is if you are going to cheat then cheat big- and the law will never touch you.

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Sounds like he has the perfect qualifications for City work - cheap, short term thinking, good at covering up and greedy.

The fact that most average workers sit that like sheep and pay whatever is demanded of them seems to be missing the point, Train fares are extortionate in the UK and he bucked the system, his personal circumstances are irrelevant.

Funny how on a forum that prides itself on being free thinking , all the above are like comments in the Wail or telegraph, So High house prices are ok it's the going rate innit? seems to be the logic on this thread.

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A lack of probity that could make him unsuitable for City work? Bumper bonus and trebles all round, surely?

1406934257243_wps_9_From_Jamie_Wiseman_1

Sounds like he has the perfect qualifications for City work - cheap, short term thinking, good at covering up and greedy.

I am not still not clear how he got away with it for so long.

His 'escape' ticket only covered the last bit of the journey.

Surely his ticket would sooner or later have been checked when he got on the train.

I only commute 4 stops on the south coast line and my season ticket is checked all the time.

There are also regular 'Revenue Protection teams scouring the network looking for non payers.

I assume other train companies employ them as well so there must be an element of this scam they are not making public.

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The fact that most average workers sit that like sheep and pay whatever is demanded of them seems to be missing the point, Train fares are extortionate in the UK and he bucked the system, his personal circumstances are irrelevant.

Funny how on a forum that prides itself on being free thinking , all the above are like comments in the Wail or telegraph, So High house prices are ok it's the going rate innit? seems to be the logic on this thread.

I guess by that standard our expense manipulating MPs should also be lauded as the kind of free thinkers the country needs.

The guy's earning £1m/year - and thinks he still needs to save a few quid on his train fare, and not only that he thinks he can keep the consequences secret too (good at covering up). Really, the price of a train fare shouldn't even be on his radar. It should be in the pocket change category, and obviously was given how quickly he was able to settle. That makes him cheap and/or greedy. Short termist - because he was willing to throw away a high earning good career on saving a bit of pocket change (to him).

None of this is to say that I don't think train fares are overpriced, or that you shouldn't try and stick to the man where possible (e.g. via split tickets). But your legal opportunities for doing so are rather limited.

I'm not sure the comparison with high house prices is a fair one as there are plenty of legal ways of not supporting them.

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Diesel is too expensive too. I just drive off as soon as I've filled up, these days.

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What about all the other bankers who have trashed millions of taxpayer money and got off with it.

They just did their job, I mean that's what they are paid to do... :blink:

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They just did their job, I mean that's what they are paid to do... :blink:

Indeed - there lies the correlation with house prices.

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I am not still not clear how he got away with it for so long.

Surely his ticket would sooner or later have been checked when he got on the train.

He travels light ...

940978_24789ef3d56ba11280487855c5cdc612-

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-30475232

So the FCA has banned him from the City for conduct unbecoming. What about all the other bankers who have trashed millions of taxpayer money and got off with it.

So depressing that the FCA has learned nothing from when it was the FSA.

The FSA spent their time on populist crusades persecuting utility companies while the general public and the financial services sector destroyed themselves with debt.

Now seven years on, instead of focusing on core structural matters they are yet again dicking about with headline grabbing populist nonsense which should never have been part of their remit in the first place.

They just shouldn't be involved in this.. It is a private matter between the guy who was fare dodging and the rail company. It's got nothing to do with the structural regulation of the financial sector. It's typical civil service tinkering about because they don't have a ******** clue about the actual job in hand.

Flipping muppets

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So depressing that the FCA has learned nothing from when it was the FSA.

The FSA spent their time on populist crusades persecuting utility companies while the general public and the financial services sector destroyed themselves with debt.

Now seven years on, instead of focusing on core structural matters they are yet again dicking about with headline grabbing populist nonsense which should never have been part of their remit in the first place.

They just shouldn't be involved in this.. It is a private matter between the guy who was fare dodging and the rail company. It's got nothing to do with the structural regulation of the financial sector. It's typical civil service tinkering about because they don't have a ******** clue about the actual job in hand.

Flipping muppets

Precisely. I use Google Newstand on my phone that collates headline news. Yesterdays Financial section listed this story seven times and it's still on there today. Scapegoating at its finest.

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So depressing that the FCA has learned nothing from when it was the FSA.

The FSA spent their time on populist crusades persecuting utility companies while the general public and the financial services sector destroyed themselves with debt.

Now seven years on, instead of focusing on core structural matters they are yet again dicking about with headline grabbing populist nonsense which should never have been part of their remit in the first place.

They just shouldn't be involved in this.. It is a private matter between the guy who was fare dodging and the rail company. It's got nothing to do with the structural regulation of the financial sector. It's typical civil service tinkering about because they don't have a ******** clue about the actual job in hand.

Flipping muppets

It is the financial equivalent of prosecuting DLT for a bit of tit groping while leaving alleged acts of rape and child abuse by establishment figures and politicians uninvestigated and unpunished.

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And this is supposed to get me wound up?

The Government print £350 Bn and give it away and I'm supposed to get annoyed by someone who's screwed a Private Transport, (there is no Public Transport) Company out of a few grand? All Private Transport should be free anyway, they receive £6Bn of Taxpayer Money every year for free and then have the audacity to charge the Taxpayer again to use it!

Just like everything in this Country, pay for it at least twice, maybe even 3 times.

Good luck to him and his ilk, if I used Private Transport I'd try and get away with not paying anyway, just on principle...

mspL4

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