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Steppenpig

Sugar Free

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Sugar free days since 25 July 2014: Nil

I had a sudden urge to make flapjacks, and then date and walnut cake, and then they had baklava in Aldi. I think i shall see if I can make it through to Xmas now.

One of the nice things about "giving up sugar" is that simple things start to taste really nice, like flapjacks. Homemade, just oats and butter and sugar, not the junk they sell in shops. Of course, the disadvantage is, your not allowed to eat them.

Plus, it's a while since we had a diet thread.

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Would one have to give up fruit, natural juices and honey in order to say one had "given up sugar", or are we just talking about the refined white caine variety? :)

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Would one have to give up fruit, natural juices and honey in order to say one had "given up sugar", or are we just talking about the refined white caine variety? :)

I personally wouldn't advise it. I gave all those things up many years ago and now my system can't handle added sugar including fruit and honey. I had two choc digestives yesterday and feel damned awful today, which is a problem because I need to put on at least a stone in weight.

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i've conned myself that i've "given up sugar" before, only to pile into juices, sweet fruits, dates, sweetened yogurt etc.

fruit juice isn't health food; neither sultana grapes.

might as well drink beer.

... speaking of which, try to knock out grain products also -- wheat is the worst

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I'm currently trying the C-Plan diet. You can eat whatever you like as long as there's a cucumber or courgette in there somewhere. Continue until you never, ever want to eat another green, schlong-shaped thing again, ever.

One of the joys of an allotment

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i've conned myself that i've "given up sugar" before, only to pile into juices, sweet fruits, dates, sweetened yogurt etc.

fruit juice isn't health food; neither sultana grapes.

might as well drink beer.

... speaking of which, try to knock out grain products also -- wheat is the worst

Funny you should say that. I've given up wheat as it seems to be the cause of this weird pompholyx eczema I have (on a couple of fingers of my left hand only, so strange), but it also seems to flare up when I have a lot of sugar (I try to avoid processed sugars but sometimes gorge on fruit, including handfuls of currants). Something to do with an imbalance in the gut flora and fauna, I'm led to believe.

So, I would be up for cutting out processed sugar entirely, but do not want to give up fruit or honey particularly, though I probably should cut down on those too...

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I'm currently trying the C-Plan diet. You can eat whatever you like as long as there's a cucumber or courgette in there somewhere. Continue until you never, ever want to eat another green, schlong-shaped thing again, ever.

One of the joys of an allotment

Courgette salad: cut fine ribbons into a large bowl with a vegetable peeler, dress with a mixture of olive oil, lemon juice and a clove or two of crushed garlic (to taste) and leave in the fridge for 20 mins or so before serving. Et voila!

Happy to help :)

(Edit: Or perhaps it was Balsamic vinegar? Try both!)

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Would one have to give up fruit, natural juices and honey in order to say one had "given up sugar", or are we just talking about the refined white caine variety? :)

The first rule of sugar free club is:

Fruit's ok. Generally, I never binge on fruit or juice. I guess i could probably drink a liter of orange juice, but some sort of natural mechanism makes we not really want to drink that much. With fruit, it's pretty hard to eat more than a couple of apples or ornges at most. I could probably eat a couple of punits of various berries I suppose, but I've never seen a fat fruitarian. (Actually, I don't know how one positively identifies fruitarians, but I suspect they're not fat)

Dried fruit is dangerous stuff though. It'll have to go. Xmas pudding is permitted between 25 December and 2nd January.

Don't know about honey. I think it has some more complicated sugars, so maybe it's not too bad. Try suck it and see. if it's addictive, give it up.

Milk's ok, even though it's 4% sugar

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Dried fruit is dangerous stuff though. It'll have to go.

Yeah, it occurs to me now that every handful is like eating a whole bunch of grapes :blink:

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As above, the type of sugar is what's important.

I have to avoid some fruits like peaches, but apples, grapefruits and pears are fine. Dried fruits are a definite no-no. Fruit juice is often all sugar and no goodness by the time it gets to your fridge, but freshly squeezed is ok.

The best thing about giving up sugar is that once you get used to it, you really don't miss it that much. I'm also lactose intolerant, and watching other people eat cheese nearly sends me into fits of depression, but I can watch them eating a sticky chocolate pudding and it doesn't bother me at all - even though I used to love them.

But a major benefit is that you will be on much more of an even keel all day, both physically and mentally. If you think of someone getting up and eating a bowl of cereal first thing in the morning, probably with a spoonful of sugar on it, then they set themselves off with a bit of a sugar rush. A couple of hours later they're starting to crash, so they have a coffee with sugar and a chocolate biscuit, sending them up again until lunchtime, when they have a white bread sandwich and some other crap, plus maybe a can of coke to wash it down. Then another crash in the afternoon, fixed with tea and choccy biscuits, followed by another sugar load for dinner. Their whole life is a series of peaks and troughs, and it affects them both physically and mentally.

Out of necessity, my breakfast is usually a chicken breast with some fried vegetables, followed by a grapefruit. That keeps me going powerfully up until lunchtime, for which I have a smoothie made of berries, half a tin of coconut milk, a banana, some beef protein powder (chocolate flavoured ) and a raw egg. That keeps me quite happy until the evening, when I have pretty much meat and veg again.

It's not an interesting diet, but nutritionally it meets all my needs and keeps me on a very even keel - plus it's not feeding the nasty little bastards in my gut that cause me to be gluten and lactose intolerant.

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The first rule of sugar free club is:

Fruit's ok. Generally, I never binge on fruit or juice. I guess i could probably drink a liter of orange juice, but some sort of natural mechanism makes we not really want to drink that much. With fruit, it's pretty hard to eat more than a couple of apples or ornges at most. I could probably eat a couple of punits of various berries I suppose, but I've never seen a fat fruitarian.

I used to be very sweet-toothed. A lot of fizzy drinks and sweets and at least a litre of OJ a day. Having massively reduced my refined sugar intake about a year ago, I now find fruit juice too sweet and have to water it down 2 parts water to 1 part juice for it to taste pleasant. Still find sweet ciders extremely palatable though.

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I find as each year passes, varieties being sold for growing on allotments are getting sweeter and sweeter too, from tomatoes to sweet corn to strawberries. So take care choosing those too.

I've noticed that too. Not just sweet but 'supersweet'. It's a bit tricky with growing sweetcorn in the UK climate but with most other veg there are heritage varieties that perform just as well as modern strains. Such that I'm not even sure why they were relegated to heritage status. Palates changing in line with factory food might be part of it.

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I'm currently trying the C-Plan diet. You can eat whatever you like as long as there's a cucumber or courgette in there somewhere. Continue until you never, ever want to eat another green, schlong-shaped thing again, ever.

One of the joys of an allotment

Cucumbers and courgettes feature in some delicious things.

But I wouldn't focus too much on them. They're not a meal, they're an addition. An enhancement to the centrepiece of your meal.

Hmmm. I wonder how much sugar they contain. Not as much as the sweeter fruits, like the blackberries that have just this week come into season in the garden.

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Courgette salad: cut fine ribbons into a large bowl with a vegetable peeler, dress with a mixture of olive oil, lemon juice and a clove or two of crushed garlic (to taste) and leave in the fridge for 20 mins or so before serving. Et voila!

Happy to help :)

(Edit: Or perhaps it was Balsamic vinegar? Try both!)

I've never tried that particular courgette consumption tactic. Will give it a go.

Though, on looking at it, I suspect it'll still be a bit on the courgettey side.

My fault, planted too many plants, always do, always will...

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I used to be very sweet-toothed. A lot of fizzy drinks and sweets and at least a litre of OJ a day. Having massively reduced my refined sugar intake about a year ago, I now find fruit juice too sweet and have to water it down 2 parts water to 1 part juice for it to taste pleasant. Still find sweet ciders extremely palatable though.

It's how perception can vary depending what you're eating or drinking. I could probably eat fudge all day, but the cheap chocalate or buscuits from lidl just taste horribly sugary. They put sugar (and I think some sort of unnatural flavouring) in their frozen fruit too, which is a shame. Although juices and "juice drinks" have a surprisingly small variation in sugar content (can't remember but something like 9 ~11%) but the sweet ones just taste horribly sweet.

Oh, too much acid fruit or juice is probably bad for the teeth too, though.

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...sweeter and sweeter too, from tomatoes ....

It's amazing how sweet even quite ordinary tomatoes get, if you grill or fry them within an inch of their lives. It's probably not good for the frying pan though. And unripe bananas

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It's how perception can vary depending what you're eating or drinking. I could probably eat fudge all day, but the cheap chocalate or buscuits from lidl just taste horribly sugary. They put sugar (and I think some sort of unnatural flavouring) in their frozen fruit too, which is a shame

I used to, occasionally, buy Lidl Dr Mengele, or whatever the brand is, pizzas to use as a base for my own concoctions. The sugar content of the tomato sauce was upped last year to a point where they really should stack them next to das Mars bars lookalikes.

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Though, on looking at it, I suspect it'll still be a bit on the courgettey side.

Not as courgettey as you might think, actually. And as porca says, definitely best eaten as an accompaniment, rather than as a meal in and of itself.

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I'm currently trying the C-Plan diet. You can eat whatever you like as long as there's a cucumber or courgette in there somewhere. Continue until you never, ever want to eat another green, schlong-shaped thing again, ever.

One of the joys of an allotment

Chocolate courgette cake recipe

It's that time of year again...!

Chocolate courgette cake

120g softened butter

125ml sunflower oil

100g caster sugar

200g soft brown sugar

3 eggs lightly beaten

130ml milk

350g plain flour

2 tsp baking powder

4 tbsp cocoa powder

450g courgettes - peeled and finely grated (No need to peel if courgettes are young and organic)

1 tsp vanilla extract

Method Put the butter, sunflower oil and both sugars in a bowl and beat them together until light and fluffy (I use my food processor). Gradually beat in the eggs and then milk.

Sift together the dry ingredients and fold them into the mixture. Stir in the courgettes and the vanilla extract.

Spoon the mixture into a baking tin (20x35cm fits well) that is lined with baking paper. Place in oven preheated to 190'C or gas mark 5 and bake for 35-45 minutes, (test by inserting a skewer in to the middle and if it comes out clean it is done). Cut into squares whilst still warm.

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I have been using Stevia for about 5 years now instead of sugar. It doesn't taste exactly the same but you get used to it very quickly. My son is hypoglycemic and using Stevia in place of all sugar has significantly reduced his crashes. It is more expensive though.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-22758059

A while back I took a sip of Coke for the first time in over 20 years. It was disgusting.

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I've been off the sugar for almost a year. Monday to Friday that is. Saturdays I have a huge sugar binge, stuff my face full of everything I didn't have in the week. Lost 2 stone and still losing. I was a proper chocolate and sweet lover though.

I firmly believe sugar (and definitely not fat) is the reason for the obesity 'epedimic'. It's in everything. Cutting it out 80% of the time seems to work for me :)

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