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Huggy

Some Good Subliminal Messages From Bbc

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-28439024

"A growing proportion of young people have been squeezed out of the housing market in England and are renting privately instead, a report suggests."

There's a lovely picture at the top of a happy couple, sitting down for a coffee, while redecorating a house. Before reading the caption, can you guess whether the BBC imply that they're homeowners, or renters...?

I've never actually complained to a media outlet before. I may break that seal all over them this afternoon :angry:

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There's a lovely picture at the top of a happy couple, sitting down for a coffee, while redecorating a house. Before reading the caption, can you guess whether the BBC imply that they're homeowners, or renters...?

I've never actually complained to a media outlet before. I may break that seal all over them this afternoon :angry:

They don't even look that young! Closer to middle age!

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Same pic is used by a US bank for home improvement loans https://www.mtb.com/personal/loanscredit/Pages/home-improvement-loans.aspx

Turn your home improvement plans into reality.
Raise the green flag.

Apply today for a new home improvement loan for as much as $25,000 with a fixed rate as low as 7.99% APR*.

  • No home equity or collateral needed
  • Approvals are easy and fast
  • Get cash in as little as 24 hours after you’re approved

And by another company for loan improvement homes in South Africa.

I liked this part, but it needed to be followed by a push for policies to end emergency low base rates, contempt for QE, and to let them crash. Not whiny build more so we can HTB VI developers and stupid entitled overpayers, and have more landlords releasing equity to dominate.

"This is a financial thumbscrew applied to people who simply have no other choice of tenure and it is hard to see how this can be characterised as anything other than exploitation.

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Last line, "61% of renters anticipated owning their own home eventually". When's that then. Just after they've done the probate on their parents place. The lucky ones anyway.

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Last line, "61% of renters anticipated owning their own home eventually". When's that then. Just after they've done the probate on their parents place. The lucky ones anyway.

Heh, to be fair I almost anticipate the same (owning eventually - within next 4 years). I'd like to believe they've still got belief in an upcoming hpc, more than anything.

Here's your new homes... and check out Saga's new insurance for landlords... these owner equity rich need to improve yield on their savings you know.

Let's build more to have HTB schemes and still be competing with bailed-out equity rich homeowners, who want to be our landlords, paying whack high prices.

'My property is going to be my pension:' Buy-to-let landlords snap up homes

PUBLISHED: 22:28, 22 March 2014

Boost: Fiona Brown has a buy-to-let flat in Cambridge, where prices are tipped to rise

Second-time investor Fiona Brown, of Market Deeping, Lincolnshire, researched her latest buy. ‘I rent out an older property in Hertfordshire but decided that a new home would be more attractive to tenants and cost less to run,’ she says.

Fiona, 36, who is director of a motor sports engineering business, targeted new builds in central Cambridge, where prices are tipped to rise 23 per cent in the next five years.

‘I chose a two-bedroom flat in the Kaleidoscope development because it’s close to the city centre but surprisingly tranquil, which I thought tenants would like,’ she says.

She was right. A young professional couple snapped up the tenancy to her £387,000 flat the moment she offered it, and she is hoping they will stay for the long term.

‘I don’t currently have a pension and I think the property will give me the best nest egg for the future,’ she says.

Some here for sale, if I've identified it correctly as Kaleidoscope development.

http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/find.html?searchType=SALE&locationIdentifier=POSTCODE^3750081

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I liked this part, but it needed to be followed by a push for policies to end emergency low base rates, contempt for QE, and to let them crash. Not whiny build more so we can HTB VI developers and stupid entitled overpayers, and have more landlords releasing equity to dominate.

Let's build more to have HTB schemes and still be competing with bailed-out equity rich homeowners, who want to be our landlords, paying whack high prices.

Building more homes and HTB don't solve the main problem, housing in the UK is now vastly over priced.

The phrase that really annoys me is "affordable". It means that nearly all housing is unaffordable and allows builders to claim that any poorly built micro on a flood plain is "affordable". :angry:

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Building more homes and HTB don't solve the main problem, housing in the UK is now vastly over priced.

The phrase that really annoys me is "affordable". It means that nearly all housing is unaffordable and allows builders to claim that any poorly built micro on a flood plain is "affordable". :angry:

Yip..more houses will just mean bankers and estate agents trying to sell more houses at higher prices to people willing to take on massive debt and sign up for government schemes.

What we need is less control, less government support, free markets, less state control, less state, more freedom. Who do we vote for to get freedom ? :lol:

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Last line, "61% of renters anticipated owning their own home eventually". When's that then. Just after they've done the probate on their parents place. The lucky ones anyway.

That's the tricky thing with long life spans: you don't get the inheritance until you're nearing retirement. Sure, it might cover some of your jumbo MEW'ing but it's a bit late for bringing up kids.

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Private renters aged 25 to 34 increased from 31% in 2008-09 to 45% in 2012-13, the report said.

Ashworth ('Property Columnist of the Year') in yesterdays' Times. I know....

Let's be frank: the English Housing Survey (EHS) is not the kind of book you take on holiday.... However, the work, compiled by the Department for Communities and Local Government is a compelling tale of the (different) way in which we live now. It should be essential reading for landlords and tenants and politicians who need to look intelligent when the word "housing" is uttered in the autumn.

The statistics confirm that an accommodation revolution has taken place: 44 percent of the 24 to 35-year-old age group are renting, compared with 30 percent six years ago. Around two thirds of them expect to have a place of their own day, according to the EHS. How they will achieve this is unclear. Even it they "hutch up", with six persons occupying a flat meant for two, they are spending 40 per cent of their income on rent, against the 21 per cent spent by the average homeowner with a mortgage.

These findings will excite those who plan to snap up rental homes after the pension reforms next year. They will also be gratified by the survey from the Knight Frank estate agency, which shows that total returns from the private rented sector are rising. In Manchester and Birmingham, you can earn gross yields in excess of 8 per cent. Some politicians may think that the arrival of these amateur landlords should solve the rising rents by increasing the supply of property. However, there is still a need to encourage more pension fund investment - and to curb the conduct of those letting agents who charge excessive fees to tenants and landlords.

Politicians must devote sunbed time to this issue or be found wanting by millions of voters who are tenants. Many among the political classes may prefer to pore over the particulars of glamourous homes to let, such as the £38,000-a-month house in Paultons Square, right, which is on offer through Harrods Estates. ... This escapist literature, however, should serve as yet another reminder that the renal sector is racing to the forefront of public attention.

__

Sunday Times

Once interest rates start rising, how can indebted households be helped through the painful transition?

20 July 2014

..To appreciate the extraordinary period we have lived through, consider that a household with a mortgage of £75k has received a cumulative ‘windfall’ of around £12.5k in the years since the crisis, relative to the cost of servicing the same mortgage before 2008 (double that for a mortgage of £150k).That’s a very big gain and - for many homeowners, as opposed to renters, has compensated for the squeeze in real incomes.

Edited by Venger

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'My property is going to be my pension:' Buy-to-let landlords snap up homes
PUBLISHED: 22:28, 22 March 2014

article-0-1C7CD34700000578-834_634x375.j

Boost: Fiona Brown has a buy-to-let flat in Cambridge, where prices are tipped to rise

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/money/mortgageshome/article-2586872/I-got-buy-let-investing-right-second-time-Landlords-best-rates-home-loans.html

http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/find.html?searchType=SALE&locationIdentifier=POSTCODE^3750081

Yesterday's Times. Last chance! :lol:

Your Last Chance To Buy A City Centre Apartment In Cambridge

.....

Benefit from a high internal specification, excellent capital growth opportunities
and waiting rental tenants.

2 bedroom apartments priced from £395,000

Images include option upgrades at additional cost

last_chance.JPG

post-12306-0-75213400-1406337502_thumb.jpg

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The statistics confirm that an accommodation revolution has taken place: 44 percent of the 24 to 35-year-old age group are renting, compared with 30 percent six years ago.

Look above.... some chose and choose not to buy, at these prices. Even if they could be enabled by HTB, some decline it.

I don't know what excuses will come into the next crash, to top the ridiculous excuses given in 2008-11 for those who paid extreme prices. Excuses for private buyers "They believed what they saw on the telly. You can't expect them to know there would have been a crash. They believed what their parents told them about ever rising prices. They just wanted a home. They didn't know what they were doing. Media lured them into it."

Quarter million pounds for a cramped 2 bed maisonette in rural nowhere, on high rate mortgage - and they "didn't know what they were doing". Lobbying for protection of BTLers, to protect extreme values for older owners. Then we had reflation, and another massive round of 'victims' paying even higher prices in many areas, for past few years. Thanks a lot, softies, anti-hpcers.

Landlords escape crunch on mortgage borrowing as banks offer more buy-to-let deals with rates at record lows

By Marc Shoffman

Published: 15:44, 25 July 2014 | Updated: 16:17, 25 July 2014

The top rates in the residential mortgage market may be disappearing but buy-to-let borrowers are still benefiting from record numbers of products and low rates.

Research from Moneyfacts shows the number of products available to landlords has risen to highs not seen since 2008, with 665 buy-to-let mortgages now available.

It comes as broker Mortgages for Business says much of the growth in products has been driven by five-year fixed rates.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/money/mortgageshome/article-2702681/Landlords-spoilt-choice-buy-let-market-best.html

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That's the tricky thing with long life spans: you don't get the inheritance until you're nearing retirement. Sure, it might cover some of your jumbo MEW'ing but it's a bit late for bringing up kids.

Agree. I was flippant in my last comment as it was off the back of the irritation of the boyfriends boomer parents banging on about how it was all going to be ok because he'd inherit. In my world I inherit precisely £0. In reality he'll be 60+ before that ever happens, and it's crass/dangerous/tragic to base life around that anyway.

Edited by Starla

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Agree. I was flippant in my last comment as it was off the back of the irritation of the boyfriends boomer parents banging on about how it was all going to be ok because he'd inherit. In my world I inherit precisely £0. In reality he'll be 60+ before that ever happens, and it's crass/dangerous/tragic to base life around that anyway.

Truth is that for many Care home fees will eat any equity that their parents have and leave them with squat.

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Truth is that for many Care home fees will eat any equity that their parents have and leave them with squat.

Yes. Which is why those that know they will inherit nothing are so much better prepared in many cases. So many people are holding out for something they won't get. Make your own plans.

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Yes. Which is why those that know they will inherit nothing are so much better prepared in many cases. So many people are holding out for something they won't get. Make your own plans.

Absolutely......rely on no one except yourself, don't expect anything from anyone except yourself, never believe in promises that may never come true.......then anything extra will be a bonus. ;)

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