Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Dave Beans

Car Warranty When Bought From A Dealer

Recommended Posts

I thought a dealer had to legally supply at least a three month warranty with any used car they sell - that was a whole point of going to a dealer, so I thought...

However, looking at this listing...

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Seat-Leon-1-8-20v-T-225-bhp-2004MY-Cupra-R-/121378259947?pt=Automobiles_UK&hash=item1c42b543eb

The dealer says that they will only supply this warranty if you pay the list price...is this legal? I'll probably buy something private in any case...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is difficult legally for them to remove consumer rights even with statements like 'trade sale' from genuine consumers. Although it will most likely be a slog through the courts to enforce it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is difficult legally for them to remove consumer rights even with statements like 'trade sale' from genuine consumers. Although it will most likely be a slog through the courts to enforce it.

Yes their ad is utterly wrong but there's thousands of LCRs out there, pick another.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Remember if it's a private sale treat everything as 'spares or repairs' potentially. They almost certainly don't have a baby on the way, a new job or a wife that's told them to get rid of it.

The car in the listing could well be an engine rebuild project supplied in an attractive looking four wheeled trolley.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Remember if it's a private sale treat everything as 'spares or repairs' potentially. They almost certainly don't have a baby on the way, a new job or a wife that's told them to get rid of it.

The car in the listing could well be an engine rebuild project supplied in an attractive looking four wheeled trolley.

I've still got my Alfa 156 that I bought off ebay 7 years ago, so hopefully I know how to spot a dog... :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is difficult legally for them to remove consumer rights even with statements like 'trade sale' from genuine consumers. Although it will most likely be a slog through the courts to enforce it.

Trading standards might be interested.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've still got my Alfa 156 that I bought off ebay 7 years ago, so hopefully I know how to spot a dog... :)

Sorry, I just got the impression you were after the security of a warranty and, in my experience, very few private sales are genuine in nature.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry, I just got the impression you were after the security of a warranty and, in my experience, very few private sales are genuine in nature.

really? I've even bought at auction, and no problem there...several family members have too...When I saw the listing, I found it interesting that the dealer thought that the warranty was optional, that's all..If it was optional, you're almost no better buying from auction, or privately...perhaps I've been lucky?

For instance, if you get a car with a pretty much a full service history, its usually a good sign its been looked after..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On a 2nd hand car, I have always negotiated a discount on the price for NO warranty.

IMO the warranties are not worth the paper they are written on as per '1929crash'.

And if you buy from a dealer you have consumer rights laws in any case.

Just make sure you give the car a good 'once over' and accept you are buying a 2nd hand car

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On a 2nd hand car, I have always negotiated a discount on the price for NO warranty.

IMO the warranties are not worth the paper they are written on as per '1929crash'.

And if you buy from a dealer you have consumer rights laws in any case.

Just make sure you give the car a good 'once over' and accept you are buying a 2nd hand car

Depends where your warranty is coming from, if its from an 'Approved Used' scheme then you will get a lot more than a dodgy aftermarket scheme that a back street guy uses for a £1k car...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On a 2nd hand car, I have always negotiated a discount on the price for NO warranty.

IMO the warranties are not worth the paper they are written on as per '1929crash'.

And if you buy from a dealer you have consumer rights laws in any case.

Just make sure you give the car a good 'once over'

Yes..

Plus, if you are going to rely on a warranty, that means at the least taking the car back to a dealer who could be 15 miles away.

The way I see it.. if I have £4k to buy a car, then I may as well pay £3k for a minimum-warranty car and save the £1k for repairs if needed - which can then be done at my local garage that I know to be reliable, than pay £4k for a car with a big warranty, meaning I've already spent the money AND I have no idea how well they'll honor the warranty or what is excluded.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've had some good deals from car auctions but it can be time consuming. Doesn't take many visits to learn who the dealers are. Then, when the dealer(s) stop bidding on whatever car I was in the market for, I'd go one bid higher. If I got outbid, I'd wait for the next suitable car.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry, I just got the impression you were after the security of a warranty and, in my experience, very few private sales are genuine in nature.

If you buy something "unusual" from an "enthuiast", they probably will be genuine!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can assure you that professional buyers make cars expensive for the general public precisely because of this way of thinking. Quite often members of the public will have been able to purchase the same car in a garage with a warranty more cheaply after auction indemnities and sundry charges.

It depends how desperate the dealer wants to get rid of a particular motor..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dealers are not working in as big a markup as perhaps people think. Quite often the vehicle is literally a vehicle for selling product i.e. warranty, finance, gap etc. Members of the public are whalloped by charges from the auction house. Once this difference is taken into account I would think that for the uninitiated, on the balance of probabilities they would massively reduce their risk exposure by buying through non trade routes to market. A trade sale may be cheaper but whilst these costs may not be immediately evident they still exist.

If someone buys a cheap car from auction they will quite happily share their prowess amongst their peers, if they buy a shed it is highly unlikely that they are going to want to make public their mistake.

My dad recently bought a 10 plate Citroen Xsara Picasso (I know!) from a dealer, at trade(£3.5k)..it was a stop gap, and has just sold it on for £4.2k with no haggling...the forecourt price of that car would be £5k. If you wave cash at them, you may get it for £4.5k.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can assure you that professional buyers make cars expensive for the general public precisely because of this way of thinking. Quite often members of the public will have been able to purchase the same car in a garage with a warranty more cheaply after auction indemnities and sundry charges.

What are the sundry charges? In my car buying days it was just the auction house rip that allegedly protected you if the motor was stolen or had finance owing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you're confusing a warranty with statutory consumer rights. Car traders don't have to supply a warranty per se, but still have to comply with the provisions of the sales of goods act etc.

What is illegal is when a trader tries to exclude your legal rights as a consumer, the classic example being when a trader refuses to give a refund on faulty goods and only offers an exchange or a credit note, or as with vehicles states sold as seen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

£15 V5 admin fee

2.5% credit card charge

c£50 (unavoidable) if purchased car has a Manheim Assured/BCA Assured screen sticker

Punitive indemnity rates which depend on the purchase price. e.g.£200 car £200 indemnity £5000 car £400 indemnity. Don't quote me on these rates as they are only ballpark figures.

Quite often the hammer price does not give the full picture particularly if being compared to a retail purchase.

BCA fees...

http://www.british-car-auctions.co.uk/buy/Useful-information/How-to-buy-at-auction/Payment,-delivery-and-collection/

Vehicle payment and delivery or collection

Once the hammer comes down on your vehicle, you’ll want to take it away as soon as possible.

Deposit payment

You can either pay your deposit before the sale at the cashier’s office or immediately following a successful bid at the rostrum in the auction hall. The deposit will be £500 or 20% of the hammer price, whichever is greater. Deposits must be paid in cash or by Maestro or Visa debit card.

How to pay the balance

Go to the cashier’s office and pay the balance of the agreed price and buyer’s fee. We make this simple with a range of payment options:

  • telegraphic transfer - call the auction centre for more details
  • MasterCard or Visa credit card to a maximum value of £50,000 (subject to a handling fee of 2.5% + VAT). Only 1 credit card per transaction.
  • debit card, such as UK Maestro, Visa and Electron, to a maximum value of £50,000
  • cash, to a maximum of £9,000 for any single transaction or series of linked transactions (subject to a handling fee of 1.25% + VAT)
  • cheque – if you have a BCA cheque account you can take the vehicle immediately, otherwise we will wait for your cheque to clear and you will need to return to collect your vehicle
  • banker’s draft to a maximum value of £5,000 with 2 forms of ID (vehicles released on cleared funds, or subject to BCA Account and credit limit status)
  • You can also Pay Online for certain services.

PLEASE NOTE - time restrictions for payment and collection on a Saturday vary at differentAuction Centres, please always check before travelling.

If you have any questions about payment, please contact the cashier before you bid for any vehicle.

Buyer's fee

We charge a buyer’s fee on each vehicle (or lot) you buy, to cover the cost of our services. This also includes our guarantee that the vehicle:

  • is not stolen property;
  • has no outstanding hire purchase or similar finance charges against it;
  • has not been a total loss or treated as such by an insurance company prior to the date of auction sale, and this fact has not been disclosed; or
  • does not have an odometer reading that is warranted as accurate but subsequently proved to be false.

The buyer’s fee depends on the value of the vehicle and the number of vehicles you have purchased in the previous 12 months - see the My BCA card range of tariffs. All buyer’s fees are subject to VAT.

Hire purchase arrangements

BCA does not offer hire purchase arrangements. If you want to buy a car using hire purchase or similar facilities, you must make your own private arrangements with a finance house or bank before attending the auction. You must show the finance company’s cheque or letter of commitment to the cashier before you bid for any vehicle.

V5C registration documents

Because we act as an agent for the seller, we are obliged to notify the DVLA of any change of ownership or keeper and to provide new name and address details when we sell a vehicle.

Therefore, when you have completed your purchase, we will update the V5C registration document before we hand over the vehicle to you. We then forward the relevant part of the V5C registration document to the DVLA at Swansea on your behalf. The DVLA will send you a new V5C registration document with your details.

If you are a private buyer or do not hold a MyBCA card, we will charge you a fee of £26 (incl VAT) for this service.

Removing your vehicles

Having arranged payment and registration documents for your new vehicle you are requested to remove it. As you can imagine, we need to keep things moving at our auction centres to make sure we always have fresh stock for our customers. Therefore unless your payment is in the process of clearing you must pay for and remove your new vehicle within 24 hours of buying it.

After this time, unpaid-for cars and motorcycles will attract a storage charge of £17.00 + VAT per day or part. Higher charges apply for LCVs, HGVs, plant and equipment, caravans, motorhomes, buses and coaches. The daily charge for MyBCA Blue cardholders is £15.00 + VAT; further concessions apply to other MyBCA cardholders.

If you need help, our fast, professional vehicle delivery team will be happy to advise and quote on your delivery needs. For further information, contact your local BCA centre.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you're confusing a warranty with statutory consumer rights. Car traders don't have to supply a warranty per se, but still have to comply with the provisions of the sales of goods act etc.

What is illegal is when a trader tries to exclude your legal rights as a consumer, the classic example being when a trader refuses to give a refund on faulty goods and only offers an exchange or a credit note, or as with vehicles states sold as seen.

So, say you bought a motor from a dealer, and a month in, the gearbox goes. Is there any recourse?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can assure you all of the fees I have referred to definitely exist when purchasing a vehicle from BCA, it seems unusual that they do not highlight them more prominently in their advice to prospective buyers.

I may have the given the amounts incorrectly but I did point that out.

Other auction houses can be slightly different, but I suspect run on similar lines...I've used Westbury a couple of times...I remember buying a Pug 405 from there a fair while ago for £180, and they charged £30 on top...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Forget warranties and statutory rights and pursuing things through the courts.

Always pay by credit card and then if anything goes wrong use Section 75 of the Consumer Credit Act 1974 to bring liability on to the bank. Do not go through the courts but go to the financial ombudsman,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Forget warranties and statutory rights and pursuing things through the courts.

Always pay by credit card and then if anything goes wrong use Section 75 of the Consumer Credit Act 1974 to bring liability on to the bank. Do not go through the courts but go to the financial ombudsman,

Wont you get hammered on CC fees? I spose thats the price you'll have to pay for a "warranty"...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wont you get hammered on CC fees? I spose thats the price you'll have to pay for a "warranty"...

Not if you have the cash in the first place. You simply use the card to make the purchase and then pay off the debt.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • The Prime Minister stated that there were three Brexit options available to the UK:   206 members have voted

    1. 1. Which of the Prime Minister's options would you choose?


      • Leave with the negotiated deal
      • Remain
      • Leave with no deal

    Please sign in or register to vote in this poll. View topic


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.