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University (Graduation At 27)...the Reason We Will All Have To Work Til 70 Soon? What Age Did You Start Work?


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a shilling is supposed to be the equivalent of 60p these days. Not sure how many good tools you could buy with that now! ;)

I love old tools. Geeky obsession of mine. Properly made!

I always thought that myself..pitiful....but we were supposed to save up and buy a tool at a time :/..I reckon it was more of a token allowance than anything. I still own the original 1/2 and 1 inch Stanley wood chisels..2 inch width wood plane and massive unwieldy cross cut saw..in the days when you could sharpen the teeth and fix the angles of them....I obviously bought my tools without seeking advice..they were always to big and heavy...maybe I was trying to prove something :/

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Perhaps better to ask how old were you when you lost your first full time job. For some redundancy is a part of the routine of life with no financial benefits, for others it is a blessing, depends on your age.

A friend of mine had been made redundant from 4 full time jobs before he turned 19. Redundancy pay - 0.

Without job security you can't really work full time, not for extended periods. You don't get a job for life these days, not unless your lucky/connected.

It'd be nice to get a job for life, hell it would be nice to get a job with a degree of security and be employed long enough to qualify for redundancy payments for when the inevitable unemployment beckons.

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The obvious solution is for kids to stay in university until they're 70. They won't need to earn any money, because they can just keep taking student loans every year. The smart ones will become lecturers and join the middle class, while the rest remain in the learning class until they retire.

Edited by MarkG
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The obvious solution is for kids to stay in university until they're 70. They won't need to earn any money, because they can just keep taking student loans every year. The smart ones will become lecturers and join the middle class, while the rest remain in the learning class until they retire.

If only they would let you do that.

In practice, to quote the NUS website http://www.nus.org.uk/en/advice/money-and-funding/ive-already-got-a-uk-honours-degree--can-i-get-funding-for-more-higher-education/

If you already have a UK honours degree and want to study for another higher education qualification at a lower or equivalent level (eg a second honours degree) in the UK, you can only get very limited support from the government. However, there are a few exceptions. ...

You’re not usually entitled to a tuition fee loan or grant, or grant for living costs for any part of the new course. However, you may be entitled to supplementary grants (eg for disabled students and for students with children and/or adult dependants) for your new course, and a loan for living costs as well, depending on where you’re from:

  • England, Wales and Northern Ireland: you’re eligible for funding from Student Finance England, Wales or NI you can get a loan for living costs if your new course leads to a professional qualification, eg as a medical doctor, dentist, veterinary surgeon, social worker, architect, town planner (for medicine, dentistry or social work you may be able to get an NHS, Care Council for Wales or DHSSPS bursary instead or as well – see below).
  • Scotland: if you’re eligible for funding from the Student Awards Agency for Scotland (SAAS), you can get a loan for living costs for a second degree course, as well as any supplementary grants, but you usually have to make some fee contribution, and you have limited access to bursaries. If you’re a dentistry student you may be able to get funding for your tuition fees. For more information, see Repeat periods of study and previous assistance.

Your tuition fees may be higher than the standard rates, though, because fees for students on second degree courses aren’t regulated, and the funding that the university or college receives from the government is more restricted.

If you’re a student at Oxford or Cambridge and you want to study a second degree, you may be charged college fees in addition to tuition fees. You may be able to apply for a College Fee Loan (CFL) to cover the college fees only. Speak to your student finance provider if you think this applies to you.

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What was the age when you got your first full time job? In my case at 15 years and 10 months...Last O level on the Friday, starting full time work on the Monday in June 1980.I note the average age for graduation is now 27....though that may involve some working in between.I can't find an actual stat for the mean age of when people start their first full time job......but it would be interesting to see the change over time.But how can we expect to retire at 67 if we are graduating at 27. Only work can pay for stuff like retirement and Tony Blair in his wisdom decided to delay that.http://aces.shu.ac.uk/employability/resources/reflex_report_5.pdf

Left college and started working at the age of 18 years and 8 months few months after college. First wage was £4.80p/h or £10k PA at 40hrs per week. Hated it, stuck with it for 3.5 years until I got something better. During this time went on courses. Only been out of work for for a total of 7 months in my working life, this is due to furthering my education at 29-30. I'm now 34 and working I'm now on 28k plus PA.

Since there are no longer 'jobs for life', training or further education seems to be the way forward these days.

I seem to learn better later in life than during my school years, not sure why, is it the same for you?

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27.. :)

Bit misleading though, I had a couple of years working, and if you are a PhD student you have a teaching workload which you are effectively paid for. (Indeed, 8 hour's helpdesk work, 8 hour's lab tutorials, plus ad-hoc Computers course support and a week's lecture course to give, for a total income of perhaps £7k a year..

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16, an engineering apprenticeship in 1995 (probably one of the last proper 4/5 year engineering apprenticeships at a large firm with an in-house training school) I think we were earning about £65/70 a week, day release to college to study ONC/HNC/HND... I didn't carry on and do a degree because I got fed up with being taught about outdated technologies, I was learning more at work on projects etc, but maybe I should have.

I'm fortunate enough to of been in employment ever since, dodging two company closures/major redundancies.

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The starting post on this thread is based on the assumption that there is a connection between the amount of work you do in a lifetime and the quantity of resources you will be able to consume. I assume the OP still believes it because it was true during the period in which he was growing up, but it hasn't been true for quite some time now.

The real predictors of how much you will be able to consume in a lifetime are:

- family connections (using family's social/financial capital to enter trade/profession, inheritance)

- level of subsidy/taxation the state decides to impose on your demographic (year of birth, gender, dependents)

- correctly timing your entry and exit from asset bubbles

Some very good points.......it probably is 75% lottery and 25% meritocracy these days.

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Perhaps better to ask how old were you when you lost your first full time job. For some redundancy is a part of the routine of life with no financial benefits, for others it is a blessing, depends on your age.

A friend of mine had been made redundant from 4 full time jobs before he turned 19. Redundancy pay - 0.

Without job security you can't really work full time, not for extended periods. You don't get a job for life these days, not unless your lucky/connected.

It'd be nice to get a job for life, hell it would be nice to get a job with a degree of security and be employed long enough to qualify for redundancy payments for when the inevitable unemployment beckons.

Got laid off aged 29, was 4 months from becoming a father. Went self employed and stayed that way until I physically couldn't work any more.

First job was July 1966, aged 15, factory work for the summer hols. Wasted my time doing O levels, never got asked to show my quals and it only took a few months of office work to tell me never to work in an office again.

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Started work at 16 so no guilt about getting my 5 years paid for by the taxpayer between 65 and 70 that todays yoof are getting between 16 and 21.

I was 16 in 1991 when i started working in a shipyard, i wont be getting a state pension until 70 though it could be pushed back further, personally i dont think a state pension will be around in its current form in 2045.

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i dont think a state pension will be around in its current form in 2045. t

In the year 2045

If man is still alive

if woman can survive

then your pensions will take a dive

In the year 2045

Ain't gonna tell the truth, tell no lies

Everything you contribute today

will the civil servant's pension's pay

In the year 2045

won't fix your teeth, won't heal your eyes

The NHS will be privatized

aint no one to hear your cries

continues for another 11 verses...

Edited by davidg
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I was a registered pupil or student in full-time education until age 25 (PhD), but worked part-time throughout that time from age 15, and towards the end of my education was earning significantly more than the equivalent of a full-time, minimum wage salary.

However, the OP's implicit point remains, which I take to be that we are increasingly heading in the direction of people being educated to 21 and then starting wage-earning careers that, a couple of generations ago, were typically started at age 18. I place a large amount of the blame for this on the decline of the secondary education system. I taught in UK higher education from 1997-2013, and during that time there was a decline in what first year undergrads were actually capable of when they came in through the door, comparing ostensible like for like in terms of A-level grades. I'm not a secondary education expert, and therefore cannot opine with any authority as to why this decline in the secondary education system's effectiveness has happened. All I know is that it has, and that by the end of my time in HE we were having to teach undergrads things that previously they would have learned in high school. So to put it in brutal, economic terms, the declining secondary education system is costing three years of productivity per person that were previously available to the economy.

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Perhaps better to ask how old were you when you lost your first full time job. For some redundancy is a part of the routine of life with no financial benefits, for others it is a blessing, depends on your age.

A friend of mine had been made redundant from 4 full time jobs before he turned 19. Redundancy pay - 0.

Without job security you can't really work full time, not for extended periods. You don't get a job for life these days, not unless your lucky/connected.

It'd be nice to get a job for life, hell it would be nice to get a job with a degree of security and be employed long enough to qualify for redundancy payments for when the inevitable unemployment beckons.

Been working for the last 13 years or so...and been made redundant twice...I suspect I'll be made redundant a few more times throughout my "career"...that's why I see mortgages as a generally outmoded concept, especially when they are started to be stretched out to 35 years+

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I was a registered pupil or student in full-time education until age 25 (PhD), but worked part-time throughout that time from age 15, and towards the end of my education was earning significantly more than the equivalent of a full-time, minimum wage salary.

However, the OP's implicit point remains, which I take to be that we are increasingly heading in the direction of people being educated to 21 and then starting wage-earning careers that, a couple of generations ago, were typically started at age 18. I place a large amount of the blame for this on the decline of the secondary education system. I taught in UK higher education from 1997-2013, and during that time there was a decline in what first year undergrads were actually capable of when they came in through the door, comparing ostensible like for like in terms of A-level grades. I'm not a secondary education expert, and therefore cannot opine with any authority as to why this decline in the secondary education system's effectiveness has happened. All I know is that it has, and that by the end of my time in HE we were having to teach undergrads things that previously they would have learned in high school. So to put it in brutal, economic terms, the declining secondary education system is costing three years of productivity per person that were previously available to the economy.

I detect a hole in your logic. As we know, far more A grades are issued nowadays then was the case 17 years ago, so if the abilities of the students had remained unchanged over that time, you would expect the abilities of A grade students to have fallen on average. This means that there is an alternative explanation for the reduced abilities of your undergrads: your university was no longer managing to attract the best students by the time you left.

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The abilities of A-grade (and all other grade) students HAVE fallen on average. I believe that what was being assessed in order to achieve a given A-level grade diminished significantly during the '00s. In terms of the A-level grade we were asking for on paper, that remained almost unchanged during that period (it changed from BBB to ABB on the programme I was responsible for in 2010, but that was it).

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After flunking out of university, I started full time aged 20 and 4 months in November '99, flogging cameras and camcorders for £600 a month plus commission. The room I was renting at the time was about £200 a month so TBH I lived the life of riley for a while; after I bought a Dreamcast the next year I calculated that I'd spent near on a grand on games and accessories for it six months later! At the time I hardly drank and was quite happy living on cornflakes, peanut butter sandwiches and fried mince though. I've had one six-month period of unemployment since after accepting voluntary redundancy from a civil service job that was so boring I came close to being disciplined for underperformance, it was just too tedious!

Got a job as a bus driver after that and nearly doubled my previous income in the first year- I was lucky though, new starters now are on a lower hourly rate than I got in 2006! :huh: Got promoted to a supervisor role 20 months after starting for not much more money but far less hassle from the travelling public.

Last year I got fed up with it and eventually persuaded my employer to let me job share with a colleague, I do two days a week, he does three. The plan was to do the London Taxi Knowledge but I've got fed up with that now, and have applied to be a train driver. In the meantime my 2 days a week still earns me £1k a month, and as we've moved in with my mum rent free I'd still be saving money every month were it not for the fact that my wife spends about twice as much as me while earning half as much :rolleyes: . I'm still making the equivalent of a 40 hour week at minimum wage so I guess my stamp's still being paid, I must have 13 years now. I also don't expect to get much or any state pension out of it but I don't plan on being reliant on it anyway...

Edited by Rave
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