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University (Graduation At 27)...the Reason We Will All Have To Work Til 70 Soon? What Age Did You Start Work?

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What was the age when you got your first full time job? In my case at 15 years and 10 months...Last O level on the Friday, starting full time work on the Monday in June 1980.

I note the average age for graduation is now 27....though that may involve some working in between.

I can't find an actual stat for the mean age of when people start their first full time job......but it would be interesting to see the change over time.

But how can we expect to retire at 67 if we are graduating at 27. Only work can pay for stuff like retirement and Tony Blair in his wisdom decided to delay that.

http://aces.shu.ac.uk/employability/resources/reflex_report_5.pdf

Edited by crashmonitor

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In my area it's minimum wage for life or go to university basically.

Unless you have a family member with a trade/business you can get into those are the options for 95% of kids.

Little wonder most attempt uni (even when they probably shouldn't).

A lot come out of uni and just end up doing those minimum wage jobs anyway of course.

Not sure I'd blame Blair for that (although it did get worse under him). Not sure I'd blame Thatcher either (fashionable, and she certainly ushered said era in, but it's happened globally really).

Probably not particularly helpful to blame anyone. It doesn't effectively conjure a solution. I have no idea what that is either being as it's almost certainly the result of a complicated mix of globalisation (manufacturing jobs all going abroad), and machination/computing advances putting folk on the lowest rungs out of work and hollowing out the middle (so we effectively have grunts and managers and not much in between).

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In my area it's minimum wage for life or go to university basically.

Unless you have a family member with a trade/business you can get into those are the options for 95% of kids.

Little wonder most attempt uni (even when they probably shouldn't).

A lot come out of uni and just end up doing those minimum wage jobs anyway of course.

Not sure I'd blame Blair for that (although it did get worse under him). Not sure I'd blame Thatcher either (fashionable, and she certainly ushered said era in, but it's happened globally really).

Probably not particularly helpful to blame anyone. It doesn't effectively conjure a solution. I have no idea what that is either being as it's almost certainly the result of a complicated mix of globalisation (manufacturing jobs all going abroad), and machination/computing advances putting folk on the lowest rungs out of work and hollowing out the middle (so we effectively have grunts and managers and not much in between).

Agreed its a global trend and we would probably have this situation whoever was in power from 1997-2010. Often sited that we need a more educated workforce to compete globally...but there is also a lot of waste and you mention graduates that go on to get non graduate jobs.

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but there is also a lot of waste and you mention graduates that go on to get non graduate jobs.

Yep.

Mainly those with weak degrees of course.

It's waste... but really they're where they would have been anyway eventually (stuck on minimum wage). The uni has made money... the landlord in the area they studied in has made money. Waste for them yes, but not for the system geared to take advantage of their desperation. ;)

Don't think this generation of kids have the same way to get on in life I had.

Last 35 years have made it progressively worse for most in that regard.

You stay where you're born. If you're smart enough (in the right area) you can get out of course, but the jobs in those areas will never be for everyone.

If you're not academic in the right way and you haven't picked up a trade from family... well good luck with that. The Victorian era has returned.

Has benefit culture connotations as well of course.

Give people the chance to get on in life through work, everyone wants it.

Make it so it means they're just treading water for the rest of their life and giving most of their wage to a boomer landlord...well... it's not a smart way of encouraging work put it that way.

Edited by byron78

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What was the age when you got your first full time job? In my case at 15 years and 10 months...Last O level on the Friday, starting full time work on the Monday in June 1980.

I note the average age for graduation is now 27....though that may involve some working in between.

I can't find an actual stat for the mean age of when people start their first full time job......but it would be interesting to see the change over time.

But how can we expect to retire at 67 if we are graduating at 27. Only work can pay for stuff like retirement and Tony Blair in his wisdom decided to delay that.

http://aces.shu.ac.uk/employability/resources/reflex_report_5.pdf

In my case, 15 years and one week. I spent the first year saving, from my two bob an hour, and life started a year later at 16 years and one week, when I passed my motorcycle test....... freedom :D.

Edit: Semi-retired at 50, fully retired at 56.

Edited by Bruce Banner

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...

I note the average age for graduation is now 27....though that may involve some working in between.

...

http://aces.shu.ac.uk/employability/resources/reflex_report_5.pdf

That's a bit misleading. The report you link to has a graph (Figure 2 on page 4) which shows that 72% of UK students graduate when they're between 20 and 24, 7% between 25 and 29, and 21% when they're 30 or over (note that this is undergraduate degrees only). It looks like the average is being pushed upwards by a large number of mature students.

Also, it says in Appendix A

The graduates were selected from the 1999/2000 graduating cohort and were contacted by means of a mailed questionnaire (with the option of completing a web-based questionnaire) in the spring of 2005.

That was 14 or 15 years ago, so things may well have changed by now, although I've no idea in which direction.

Edited by Scunnered

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19, had no interest in Uni and fed up of being skint. Worked from the age of 13/14 doing a paper round then Saturday jobs 16 onwards

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Standard 21. Was on the conveyor-belt from GCSEs>A-levels>University, as it seemed we all were at my school at the time. Really wish I'd taken a couple of years out to evaluate what I really wanted to do in life (not just to do the fashionable thing and go to Oz for a year! ;) ). Had part time jobs before Uni/during school/during Uni but just 20h a week.

Edited by Mr 0.01%

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Started work at 16 so no guilt about getting my 5 years paid for by the taxpayer between 65 and 70 that todays yoof are getting between 16 and 21.

Ha funny when you put it like that - no wonder there's no money left for pensions. I imagine when I get to 70 and realise I've spent the last 40 years contributing to a then worthless pension I'm going to be quite annoyed...

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What do you mean "work till seventy"? I plan to work till 66.

I was retired a couple of weeks ago but I`m now working a couple of short days a week. Surprised the hell out of me too!

Life is sweet (at the moment anyway)

Btw, I`m 54 and have worked around 6 years. Apart from that I`ve had a lifestyle business since before the term was invented.

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16 years old..earned £6 the first week.... £2 on bus fares...£2 to my Mom..£2 to spend..for fourty hours learning shopfitting..Kids of today ey? dont know arf of it

Blimey... what year was that?

Have to ask as £6 in 1972 is about £75 these days.

Not sure youth wages have changed much.

Apprentice rate is £2.60 an hour now.

My first paper round was £5 for the week and all the penny chews I could stuff in my gob when the newsagent wasn't looking ;)

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15 and 10 months. Full time clerical job that I stuck for about 6 weeks. School had not prepared me for this and it took me a while to get my head around being in the depressing world of work. Btw my best friends both went into the services - Royal navy and Parachute Reg.

Traditional apprenticeships were still around then but I had no desire for a factory job. Virtually no one went into the school 6th form.

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Some people work earlier in life and learn later in life.....35/40 years working,learning,building then off to further education to learn some more, something new something different.....there is no right or wrong way/order to do things.

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I started full-time voluntary work every weekend and all through every school holiday when I was 14. After finishing school at 16, I added several part-time jobs to the mix - then went back to sixth form in the September and carried on volunteering weekends/holidays. During those times, I probably worked 80+ hour weeks.

At uni, outside of holidays (when I was largely volunteering again) I did have a work-free period. Since leaving university at 21, I've volunteered/done paid work pretty much full-time. Some years, I've earned 4x the national average wage - and contributed taxes/NI accordingly. Depending on how much fun my paid job is, I expect to start dropping a day a week every decade from my mid forties so I can concentrate on other stuff, including volunteering and poss. stuff that also generates an income.

I guess I find paid years worked = when you can retire a bit of an odd dynamic given the varying contribution people make.

Edited by StainlessSteelCat

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Blimey... what year was that?

Have to ask as £6 in 1972 is about £75 these days.

Not sure youth wages have changed much.

Apprentice rate is £2.60 an hour now.

My first paper round was £5 for the week and all the penny chews I could stuff in my gob when the newsagent wasn't looking ;)

It was around 1971and was apprentice wages..I think we were paid around1 shilling tool allowance also to buy (usually Stanley) good tools

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Its like a 4 Yorkshire men circle jerk.

Should run a sweep for when someone will suggest bringing back national service.

People don't start work till later because that is what is expected if them and in many cases accumulate a great deal of debt on the way.

Edited by 7 Year Itch

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The starting post on this thread is based on the assumption that there is a connection between the amount of work you do in a lifetime and the quantity of resources you will be able to consume. I assume the OP still believes it because it was true during the period in which he was growing up, but it hasn't been true for quite some time now.

The real predictors of how much you will be able to consume in a lifetime are:

- family connections (using family's social/financial capital to enter trade/profession, inheritance)

- level of subsidy/taxation the state decides to impose on your demographic (year of birth, gender, dependents)

- correctly timing your entry and exit from asset bubbles

The first factor you cannot control at all and the second depends on how politically powerful your demographic is. That leaves the third as the only thing you have any real control over, and even that has become difficult now that the state has decided to intervene in asset markets every time prices drop.

Work still has a function in life. It provides social connections, gives a sense of purpose and self-esteem, and might even be an enjoyable way to pass the time. But compared to those other three factors, the amount of work you do currently has very little bearing on your material standard of living.

Edited by Dorkins

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It was around 1971and was apprentice wages..I think we were paid around1 shilling tool allowance also to buy (usually Stanley) good tools

Ah. You were on then about what apprentices still get now then.

One notable exception: a shilling is supposed to be the equivalent of 60p these days. Not sure how many good tools you could buy with that now! ;)

I love old tools. Geeky obsession of mine. Properly made!

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