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The Ayatollah Buggeri

Stop Buying Big Fridges, Middle Classes Told

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Torygraph.

Executive summary: government 'nudge' propaganda that we should stop buying large fridges because they use excessive electricity and cause global warming.

Interesting that this "report" doesn't mention the fact that buying groceries that require refridgerated storage in small quantities and without requiring a car journey to get them is just as expensive, if not more, than buying in larger quantities, less often and storing them in a larger fridge, isn't it?

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I read an interesting article last week saying that single people could save about £16 a month if they stopped using a freezer - basically, freezers run cheaper when fun but if you are single then why would you need a full freezer.

Have to admit that I have been moving from buying in bulk to buying when I need stuff. I've stopped heating my house and have almost stopped eating. Breathing will be next.

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I do wonder why some people (except for large families) have huge fridges. All too often I suspect they get stuffed with more food than people can see or keep track of, and a lot of it ends up getting chucked out. My sister in the US has a huge typically American one, and every time I go I find all sorts in it way past its best. Ditto some friends in Devon, invariably stuffed to bursting and with things festering at the back, or at the bottom of the salad/veggie drawers. No wonder they say that much of the bagged salad people buy gets chucked. It goes off faster than anything else.

IMO the huge fridge is often more of a 'statement' than an actual necessity.

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As the co-owner of a large (probably about twice the storage capacity of the fridge in my final UK home) American fridge, I can assure you that we do use the space in it and we don't let things go off, as a general rule (that having been said, Mrs. Ayatollah likes organic fruit and veg, and it's a constant struggle to finish that in time). Like most Americans and a significant proportion of Brits, we don't live within feasible walking distance of any grocery shop, and so we do have to keep enough for 3-4 days at a time. A lot of the fridge space is taken up by fruit juice, fresh water, etc., and when the fridge is full its energy consumption isn't that much more than that of a smaller one. It's large, empty fridges that really guzzle power, because every time you open them the cool air is exchanged for a lot of room temperature air, which the fridge then has to cool from scratch. Liquids and solids don't heat up as quickly when the door is opened.

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As the co-owner of a large (probably about twice the storage capacity of the fridge in my final UK home) American fridge, I can assure you that we do use the space in it and we don't let things go off, as a general rule (that having been said, Mrs. Ayatollah likes organic fruit and veg, and it's a constant struggle to finish that in time). Like most Americans and a significant proportion of Brits, we don't live within feasible walking distance of any grocery shop, and so we do have to keep enough for 3-4 days at a time. A lot of the fridge space is taken up by fruit juice, fresh water, etc., and when the fridge is full its energy consumption isn't that much more than that of a smaller one. It's large, empty fridges that really guzzle power, because every time you open them the cool air is exchanged for a lot of room temperature air, which the fridge then has to cool from scratch. Liquids and solids don't heat up as quickly when the door is opened.

we made do with a beer fridge for about a year in one house in Oz. That was in a year of a 45 degree summer. I found it meant we bought a lot less stuff, as we had to think about space more effectively (especially as half the fridge was full of beer).

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"Families could save up to £36 a year on their electricity bills by replacing large fridge-freezers or televisions with smaller appliances, according to a study published by the Department for Energy and Climate Change."

Bloody hell, let the plebs have their televisions.

I'm sitting in a microscopic new build at the moment and it's obvious that with each year that passes the new builds get smaller and smaller, and gardens are all but being wiped out.

So, if your sat in your rabbit hutch new build with no garden, in dull suburbia with nothing to do nearby, in a house that's too small to actually store any 'stuff' in, the telly's all you've got.

And now your meant to feel guilty that your big telly is causing a hole in the ozone layer?

The government can get go take a flying f*ck at themselves.

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"Plebs are encouraged to watch TV on a smartphone held really close to their faces to save electricity spent on recklessly large TV's that sit several feet away"

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But if people buy smaller fridges rather than upgrade then where is the economic growth?

The big US fridges are great, especially the plumbed-in ones which provide ice and chilled water on demand. There's not room im my kitchen for one or I'd have one.

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I live in an American fridge.

Show off.

I can only dream about living in an American fridge.

Save more than £36 a year by not buying the Telegraph.

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"Plebs are encouraged to watch TV on a smartphone held really close to their faces to save electricity spent on recklessly large TV's that sit several feet away"

:lol:

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I replaced my old fridge/freezer a couple of weeks ago and wanted one of similar size but found they now have so much insulation (I guess) to achieve the triple A energy consumption it reduces the capacity by about 20%, so I bought a larger one to compensate.

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I just got an ordinary upright fridge-freezer! I don't need one bigger than a car that makes ice cubes! As Frank says it wouldn't fit in my "bijou" kirchen!

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I read an interesting article last week saying that single people could save about £16 a month if they stopped using a freezer - basically, freezers run cheaper when fun but if you are single then why would you need a full freezer.

Have to admit that I have been moving from buying in bulk to buying when I need stuff. I've stopped heating my house and have almost stopped eating. Breathing will be next.

As a single person, I have a smaller-than-average fridge-freezer. It's very convenient: the top is just below shoulder height, so I can and do use it to keep stuff on (my herbs and spices live up there). The freezer tends to be a bit seasonal: for example, it will always be well-fed in the autumn season of abundance of good things to go in there.

There are surprisingly few appliances of that kind of size on the market. The journalist in question should perhaps be directing the campaign instead to manufacturers, retailers, and advertisers.

One tip for the freezer. If it is less than full, you can repurpose any plastic bottles or such things you have going spare. Fill with tap water and put in freezer to fill that spare space and help it run efficiently. Note that that only applies when it's less-than-full over the longer term: if it's just a short-term emptiness then freezing water will cost more than it saves.

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Perhaps not good for the environment but a big freezer serves important functions one is the fact that we can get premium bread at 20p a loaf on the sell buy and you can stock up. Also will be excellent as the blackberry picking season is upon us and I will get a years supply and about £100 worth at supermarket prices for nothing.

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Perhaps not good for the environment but a big freezer serves important functions one is the fact that we can get premium bread at 20p a loaf on the sell buy and you can stock up. Also will be excellent as the blackberry picking season is upon us and I will get a years supply and about £100 worth at supermarket prices for nothing.

Similar, also local(ish) market that I can get 3 months supply of meat direct from wholesaler.

Government would like you to be less efficient so that they can have some more tax, even hit you with the CO2 ********/guilt club to try and get it.

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Also will be excellent as the blackberry picking season is upon us and I will get a years supply and about £100 worth at supermarket prices for nothing.

How do you find freezing the blackberries? What are they like when they defrost? Don't they go all mushy?

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How do you find freezing the blackberries? What are they like when they defrost? Don't they go all mushy?

Nope they are firm. I don't think you are supposed to soak them prior to freezing in spite of the obvious bugs...but they will be dead for sure once defrosted.

Actually as most is for blackberry and apple crumble....they go into the crumble frozen prior to cooking.

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How do you find freezing the blackberries? What are they like when they defrost? Don't they go all mushy?

I stew them up before freezing. Then they come out just great to use in a pie, crumble, or similar.

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I stew them up before freezing. Then they come out just great to use in a pie, crumble, or similar.

Or use a tray to "open freeze" them in a single layer before long-term storage in a bag. Same applies to other soft fruits except strawberries but for best results use freshly picked fruit in peak condition.

Now off to collect some more raspberries!

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Middle-class families should stop buying large fridges in order to save energy and tackle climate change the utility companies having to upgrade the infrastructure, a government-commissioned report has suggested

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Or use a tray to "open freeze" them in a single layer before long-term storage in a bag. Same applies to other soft fruits except strawberries but for best results use freshly picked fruit in peak condition.

Now off to collect some more raspberries!

I will investigate this by trying it. I may be cursing you some months from now.

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I will investigate this by trying it. I may be cursing you some months from now.

I am planning to make more blackberry jam this year. Probably shouldn't as I can't fit any more jams in the jam cupboard.

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I don't do jam (don't eat it either), but I'm hoping to make a couple of jars of chutney from this year's crop. Done it before when the berries have been plentiful, and it was delicious!

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