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Secrets of the TV makeover

(Filed: 30/11/2005) Telegraph.

They always look so glamorous and convincing but, as Christine Webb reports, some property renovation shows can be guilty of covering up more than an unfashionable fireplace

Television property experts do not always get it right, as Sian Astley, a law graduate-turned-developer, discovered recently. In an episode of Channel 4's Property Ladder broadcast last month, presenter Sarah Beeny told Sian she had misjudged the market for her first development - a three-bedroom Victorian end-of-terrace in Chorlton, Manchester - and criticised Sian's designs and overspending. Nonetheless Sian went on to increase the value of the property through the renovations and has now launched her own development company which has amassed a £2 million empire.

Life after appearing on property TV, it would seem, is full of surprises. Four million viewers tuned in to the ordeal of another Property Ladder amateur, Joanna Stamatis and her husband, Brian Walden, who gutted and virtually rebuilt the front and back of their two-up, two-down cottage in Richmond, Surrey, two years ago.

"We now have an endless procession of people standing outside the house pointing at it," says the former New Yorker, ruefully. She has also been recognised by a stewardess on an international flight since the episode has been repeated several times on satellite TV. "In fact, I'm no longer a redhead, I'm now blonde, and Brian has shaved off his moustache, so we're both in disguise, or, at least, less easy to recognise!" But having your property on the television is not all glamour. "It was exciting and fun at first, but then we started having trouble with the builder," says Joanna. Filming, certainly, could be intrusive. ''At one time, 10 to 12 people stood in the rubble downstairs, wires everywhere, everyone falling over each other. Once Sarah Beeny turned up in three-inch stilettos. She had to borrow one of the researcher's shoes to cope with the rubble.

"The last three days were tough. We were under pressure as we'd gone over our 12-week schedule. For the final filming day, where you show the house all beautifully done up, we had to unpack our furniture and dress the house, and I stayed up until 3am the night before. I opened boxes expecting to find two brown chairs, but they were white. I sat on the floor and cried." They finished the house in the nick of time. "The two researchers were fantastic, it was all hands on deck. One poor girl visited the tip 15 times in one day!" Another little known fact about property television is that you get substantial discounts from suppliers because their names go up on Channel 4's website, according to Joanna. "In that respect it was worth it - we saved £30,000-£40,000. For example our kitchen units were half price." Should you have ever wondered how participants go so wildly over budget, take note: discounts are ignored when the final tally is shown. Hence, Sarah Beeny reckoned the Waldons' renovation "spend" came to £128,766, while in reality it was more like £100,000.

The house was bought at auction for £304,000, and is now on the market at £549,950 through Jackson-Stops (020 8940 6789). "We were offered £500,000 for it just after it was finished, but we were too exhausted to move," says Joanna. "Now we've found a further project, and want to sell."

Conservative MP Daniel Kawczynski and his wife, Kate, are also keen to sell their Herefordshire home as his election to Parliament in May means he must spend time in Westminster and at his Shrewsbury and Atcham constituency. So they leapt at the chance to appear on Channel 4's Location, Location, Location after their agent, McCartneys (01568 610222), was contacted by researchers.

"They were home-searching for a couple who were filmed viewing four properties, and asked to come back and see ours again the next day," says Kate. "It was nice to be picked, they chose us from between 100 and 150 properties."

Kirstie Allsopp and Phil Spencer from Location, Location

Regular viewers know the programme's finale hinges on a dramatic offer to the vendor's estate agent from the presenters Kirstie Allsopp and Phil Spencer. But those in the know say this is staged and negotiations usually proceed off-camera. Kate feared such an offer was unlikely to be forthcoming for their £725,000 36-acre equestrian property, Tack Farm, near Leominster - a researcher called to say it was too far from the buyers' current base. "Phil said most of the properties they feature sell before the programme is aired, as the agents raise a bit of publicity on the back of the programme," says Kate. "This one won't be aired until February or March, so I hope they're right."

Another seller who had a struggle on her hands was Lynne Tanner, who was delighted when two bedrooms in her home in Hugglescote, Leicestershire, were chosen for an onscreen revamp by BBC1's House Invaders.

"They chose us because my two young daughters, Holly and Jessie, both wanted new bedrooms and both wanted pink," says Lynne. "They were made to look completely different, but the outcome was not quite what I expected: they only made over two of the walls in the rooms - the ones that could be seen on camera. They had a small budget, were only here for one 12-hour day, and that's all they had time to do. It gives you an insight into how the shows are done, and, although I used to watch them avidly, it's put me off seeing any more."

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Why isn't this on the BBC's "Entertainment" news section?

"Doherty caught with druqks" or "National Broadcaster in MISLEADING LICENSE PAYERS faragoe!"

oh.

I know what I'd rather read about anyway.

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Secrets of the TV makeover

(Filed: 30/11/2005) Telegraph.

They always look so glamorous and convincing but, as Christine Webb reports, some property renovation shows can be guilty of covering up more than an unfashionable fireplace

Television property experts do not always get it right, as Sian Astley, a law graduate-turned-developer, discovered recently. In an episode of Channel 4's Property Ladder broadcast last month, presenter Sarah Beeny told Sian she had misjudged the market for her first development - a three-bedroom Victorian end-of-terrace in Chorlton, Manchester - and criticised Sian's designs and overspending. Nonetheless Sian went on to increase the value of the property through the renovations and has now launched her own development company which has amassed a £2 million empire.

Life after appearing on property TV, it would seem, is full of surprises. Four million viewers tuned in to the ordeal of another Property Ladder amateur, Joanna Stamatis and her husband, Brian Walden, who gutted and virtually rebuilt the front and back of their two-up, two-down cottage in Richmond, Surrey, two years ago.

"We now have an endless procession of people standing outside the house pointing at it," says the former New Yorker, ruefully. She has also been recognised by a stewardess on an international flight since the episode has been repeated several times on satellite TV. "In fact, I'm no longer a redhead, I'm now blonde, and Brian has shaved off his moustache, so we're both in disguise, or, at least, less easy to recognise!" But having your property on the television is not all glamour. "It was exciting and fun at first, but then we started having trouble with the builder," says Joanna. Filming, certainly, could be intrusive. ''At one time, 10 to 12 people stood in the rubble downstairs, wires everywhere, everyone falling over each other. Once Sarah Beeny turned up in three-inch stilettos. She had to borrow one of the researcher's shoes to cope with the rubble.

"The last three days were tough. We were under pressure as we'd gone over our 12-week schedule. For the final filming day, where you show the house all beautifully done up, we had to unpack our furniture and dress the house, and I stayed up until 3am the night before. I opened boxes expecting to find two brown chairs, but they were white. I sat on the floor and cried." They finished the house in the nick of time. "The two researchers were fantastic, it was all hands on deck. One poor girl visited the tip 15 times in one day!" Another little known fact about property television is that you get substantial discounts from suppliers because their names go up on Channel 4's website, according to Joanna. "In that respect it was worth it - we saved £30,000-£40,000. For example our kitchen units were half price." Should you have ever wondered how participants go so wildly over budget, take note: discounts are ignored when the final tally is shown. Hence, Sarah Beeny reckoned the Waldons' renovation "spend" came to £128,766, while in reality it was more like £100,000.

The house was bought at auction for £304,000, and is now on the market at £549,950 through Jackson-Stops (020 8940 6789). "We were offered £500,000 for it just after it was finished, but we were too exhausted to move," says Joanna. "Now we've found a further project, and want to sell."

Conservative MP Daniel Kawczynski and his wife, Kate, are also keen to sell their Herefordshire home as his election to Parliament in May means he must spend time in Westminster and at his Shrewsbury and Atcham constituency. So they leapt at the chance to appear on Channel 4's Location, Location, Location after their agent, McCartneys (01568 610222), was contacted by researchers.

"They were home-searching for a couple who were filmed viewing four properties, and asked to come back and see ours again the next day," says Kate. "It was nice to be picked, they chose us from between 100 and 150 properties."

Kirstie Allsopp and Phil Spencer from Location, Location

Regular viewers know the programme's finale hinges on a dramatic offer to the vendor's estate agent from the presenters Kirstie Allsopp and Phil Spencer. But those in the know say this is staged and negotiations usually proceed off-camera. Kate feared such an offer was unlikely to be forthcoming for their £725,000 36-acre equestrian property, Tack Farm, near Leominster - a researcher called to say it was too far from the buyers' current base. "Phil said most of the properties they feature sell before the programme is aired, as the agents raise a bit of publicity on the back of the programme," says Kate. "This one won't be aired until February or March, so I hope they're right."

Another seller who had a struggle on her hands was Lynne Tanner, who was delighted when two bedrooms in her home in Hugglescote, Leicestershire, were chosen for an onscreen revamp by BBC1's House Invaders.

"They chose us because my two young daughters, Holly and Jessie, both wanted new bedrooms and both wanted pink," says Lynne. "They were made to look completely different, but the outcome was not quite what I expected: they only made over two of the walls in the rooms - the ones that could be seen on camera. They had a small budget, were only here for one 12-hour day, and that's all they had time to do. It gives you an insight into how the shows are done, and, although I used to watch them avidly, it's put me off seeing any more."

So there we are. Property makeover porn is just product placement. bullSH%t, 15 minutes of fame, and free publicity. Nothing whatever to do with the housing market.

VP

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In another variety of property porn, my uncle and his wife had a room done on "DIY SOS" with Lowri Turner a couple of years back. They never painted or even cleaned the ceiling as it is not seen by the camera. The people on Property Ladder appear better off than my uncle; he was charged for the decorating they did, something not usually made clear on these programmes.

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Secrets of the TV makeover

(Filed: 30/11/2005) Telegraph.

The house was bought at auction for £304,000, and is now on the market at £549,950 through Jackson-Stops (020 8940 6789). "We were offered £500,000 for it just after it was finished, but we were too exhausted to move," says Joanna. "Now we've found a further project, and want to sell."

Now without the spin, the above reads like this:

WHAT £500,000 its a joke right? .......fast forward........B@gger we should have taken that £500,000 when it was offered, doubt we will see an offer of that magnitude again :(

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If you believe what that box in the corner of your room pumps out, more fool you. Remember the camera always lies! It lies because its not natural to view the world and its perspectives edited by others. :ph34r:

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If you believe what that box in the corner of your room pumps out, more fool you. Remember the camera always lies! It lies because its not natural to view the world and its perspectives edited by others. :ph34r:

What? You're telling me this now? I've been believing it all for years. How could I have been so silly? :lol:

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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